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PIONEER chronology
sariondil
post Mar 3 2009, 11:51 PM
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Have a look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naming_of_moons#Jupiter
The table lists the names proposed for Jupiter VI to Jupiter XIII from the 50s to 70s. The name Amalthea for Jupiter V was apparently proposed by Camille Flammarion shortly after its discovery in 1892. References 10 and 13 link to two Icarus papers that should discuss the nomenclature issues, but I can´t access them ringt now.
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Liss
post Mar 4 2009, 10:17 AM
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OK, speaking about chronology again. Here's the list of Pioneer 10 Jupiter flyby events (planned).
Times are evidently Spacecraft Event Time (SCET), UTC.

1973 Dec 03
Tp-14h 00m = 12:26 - Callisto, 1392300 km
Tp-12h 30m = 13:56 - Ganymede, 446250 lm
Tp-07h 00m = 19:26 - Europa, 321000 km
Tp-03h 30m = 22:56 - Io, 357000 km
1973 Dec 04
Tp-00h 00m = 02:26:00 - Pericenter, H=130000 km
Tp+00h 10m = 02:36 - Equator plane crossing
Tp+00h 15m 45s = 02:41:45 - Io occultation entry
Tp+00h 17m 16s = 02:43:16 - Io occultation exit
Tp+01h 16m 25s = 03:42:25 - Jupiter occultation entry
Tp+01h 49m 35s = 04:15:35 - Jupiter shadow entry
Tp+02h 21m 21s = 04:47:21 - Jupiter occultation exit
Tp+02h 41m = 05:07 - Jupiter shadow exit


Note: for that day, ET = UTC + 44.184 sec, and ERT = SCET + 45 min 55 sec.
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Liss
post Mar 4 2009, 10:28 AM
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And here's the list of Pioneer 11 Jupiter flyby events (planned).
Times are evidently Spacecraft Event Time (SCET), UTC.

1974 Dec 03
Tp-21h 00m = 08:21 - Callisto, 786500 km
Tp-07h 12m = 22:09 - Ganymede, 692300 km
1974 Dec 04
Tp-02h 10m = 03:11 - Io, 314000 km
Tp-01h 06m = 04:15 - Europa, 586700 km
Tp-00h 20m 58s = 05:00:21 - Jupiter shadow entry
Tp-00h 20m 18s = 05:01:01 - Jupiter occultation entry
Tp-00h 00m = 05:21:19 - Pericenter, H=42828 km
Tp+00h 12m 33s = 05:33:52 - Jupiter shadow exit
Tp+00h 21m 44s = 05:43:03 - Jupiter occultation exit
Tp+01h 08m = 22:29 - Amalthea, 127500 km


Note: for that day, ET = UTC + 45.184 sec, and ERT = SCET + 41 min 40 sec.
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Liss
post Mar 4 2009, 10:53 AM
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Finally, the Pioneer 11 flyby of Saturn events (planned).
Times are evidently Spacecraft Event Time (SCET), UTC.
No possibility to calculate the planned pericenter time from these data.

1979 Aug 27
Tp-128h 32m = 08:02 - Phoebe, 9453000 km
1979 Aug 29
Tp-82h 29m = 06:05 - Iapetus, 1039000 km
1979 Aug 31
Tp-28h 03m = 12:31 - Hyperion, 674000 km
1979 Sep 01
Tp-01h 59m = 14:35 - Descending node
Tp-01h 25m = 15:09 - Approach to rings from below
Tp-00h 30m = 16:04 - Dione, 291100 km
Tp-00h 07m = 16:27 - Dione, 291100 km
Tp-00h 00m = 16:34 - Pericenter, H=21400 km
Tp+00h 01m 30s = 16:35 - Saturn occultation entry
Tp+00h 02m = 16:35:57 - Saturn shadow entry
Tp+01h 20m = 17:53:32 - Saturn occultation exit
Tp+01h 21m = 17:54:47 - Saturn shadow exit
Tp+01h 31m = 18:05 - Departure fron rings
Tp+01h 54m = 18:28 - Tethys, 331700 km
Tp+01h 59m = 18:33 - Ascending node
Tp+01h 59m = 18:33 - Enceladus, 225200 km
Tp+06h 00m = 22:34 - Rhea, 341900 km
1979 Sep 02
Tp+25h 30m = 18:05 - Titan, 356000 km


Note: for that day, ET = UTC + 50.184 sec, and ERT = SCET + 86 min 21 sec.
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Apr 23 2009, 10:05 AM
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The decision to go for the "outside" option was taken in November 1977 so when did the Pioneer 11 controllers at NASA Ames Research Center made final adjustments to the trajectory?
March 1978? ... were there more adjustments later on?
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gwiz
post Apr 23 2009, 06:42 PM
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According to my notes, there was a correction on 13 Jul 1978.

Can't find my source for this, but there was a NASA press release on 24 Jul that said that the final correction had been made.
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Paolo
post Apr 23 2009, 07:43 PM
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Robotic Exploration of the Solar System part 1 (page 146): "the final trim maneuver on 13 July 1978 that set up the outer ring-plane crossing..."


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I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
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dmuller
post Apr 24 2009, 12:21 AM
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Thanks Liss & all other for these beautiful timelines. I have taken the liberty to include them in the timelines on my website for Pioneer 10 and Pioneer 11 ... please let me know if you object to that.


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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Apr 24 2009, 06:40 AM
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That's a great website Daniel ... and "Welcome to UMSF.com" gwiz ...
I wonder if NASA Ames will celebrate the 30th anniversary of the Pioneer 11 ( Pioneer Saturn ) flyby of the ringed world.
For an article on that subject I've found another 1970s Pioneer checkout photo, which I'll post in the Pioneer Hardware topic of the subforum smile.gif
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dmuller
post Apr 25 2009, 01:52 AM
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QUOTE (PhilCo126 @ Apr 24 2009, 04:40 PM) *
I wonder if NASA Ames will celebrate the 30th anniversary of the Pioneer 11 ( Pioneer Saturn ) flyby of the ringed world.


I sent a Twitter message (tweet) to AMES with that question. They have just answered: don't know myself, but can ask around. ...

EDIT 29/04: another tweet came back: "I asked our news chief here at Ames about the Pioneer but he is not aware of any celebrations.".
Anyway, I will try to create a historic simulation for the flyby.


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dmuller
post Apr 29 2009, 08:59 AM
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Pioneer 11 30 years ago ... now showing on my website at http://tinyurl.com/c6vopp


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climber
post Apr 29 2009, 10:35 AM
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I realy enjoy your website smile.gif


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dmuller
post Apr 30 2009, 03:21 AM
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After consulting JPL's NSSDC and Horizons websites, it seems that Saturn closest approach was at
01 Sep 1979 16:29:34 UTC at an altitude of 20,591 km (using a Saturn radius of 60,268 km).

I will update my website in due course.




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dmuller
post Apr 30 2009, 04:35 PM
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I worked the Horizons system a bit more and get the following c/a times and distances. Most are pretty close to the timeline Liss provided, with the exception of Phoebe (arguably not a close approach in either scenario!). According to these numbers, the undiscovered near-miss moon would have been Epimetheus at a distance of 6676km ... or about 6 minutes 45 seconds, given their relative speed of 59,271km/h!
Disclaimer: Horizon states that the trajectory data are reconstructed to fit the observations and is thus probably not as accurate as trajectory data available for current missions. Nevertheless:

CODE
1979-08-29  06:06:10        Iapetus closest approach (1,032,535km)
1979-08-29  11:53:33        Phoebe closest approach (13,713,574km)
1979-08-31  12:32:33        Hyperion closest approach (666,153km)
1979-09-01  14:50:55        Epimetheus closest approach (6,676km)
1979-09-01  15:59:30        Dione closest approach (291,556km)
1979-09-01  16:26:28        Mimas closest approach (104,263km)
1979-09-01  16:29:34        Saturn Flyby (altitude: 20,591km)
1979-09-01  16:51:11        Janus closest approach (228,988km)
1979-09-01  18:25:34        Tethys closest approach (329,197km)
1979-09-01  18:30:14        Enceladus closest approach (222,027km)
1979-09-01  22:15:27        Rhea closest approach (345,303km)
1979-09-02  18:00:33        Titan closest approach (362,962km)


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Liss
post May 4 2009, 06:56 PM
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QUOTE (dmuller @ Apr 24 2009, 03:21 AM) *
Thanks Liss & all other for these beautiful timelines. I have taken the liberty to include them in the timelines on my website for Pioneer 10 and Pioneer 11 ... please let me know if you object to that.

No objections: essentially these are NASA timelines.
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