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Mission: Hayabusa 2
centsworth_II
post Jan 25 2011, 11:15 AM
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QUOTE (pandaneko @ Jan 25 2011, 05:10 AM) *
... if we have an engineering camara, with a fish eye lens attached to it, can we not forget about MINERVA kind of sophisticated and expensive monitoring devices?

Of course, Minerva was not devised to monitor Hayabusa. Its purpose was to explore the surface of Itokawa. So we wouldn't want to do away with it. If I understand you, you are suggesting that the 'dumb' targets that Hayabusa dropped onto Itokawa could have had simple cameras to monitor Hayabusa's landing? Perhaps, but in addition to the camera, there would need to be a battery and transmitter along with the required electronics. More design, more testing, more weight.... unfortunately.

From http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/10055257/ns/te..._science-space/

"In this photo, taken by the Hayabusa mothership, the object within the yellow circle is thought to be the MINERVA mini-robot, floating in space. Hayabusa's shadow can be seen on the surface of asteroid Itokawa, toward the top of the frame."
Attached Image


"This picture, snapped by the MINERVA mini-robot just after its deployment, shows a solar panel on the Hayabusa mothership."
Attached Image
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Littlebit
post Jan 26 2011, 05:32 PM
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As I recall, the problem with the Haybusa sampling horn is that the probe landed much sooner than anticipated. I would guess - this is only a guess- that the software engineers did not expect the timing of the landing to be off this much and did not have the necessary flags set for the sampling sequence to execute. It is unclear (to me) whether or not the probe left because of a timer, a maximum temperature was exceeded, or the probe was ordered to depart from earth.

In any case, since they have not changed the design of the sampling horn; it seems a likely conclusion that the failure to collect a pair of good samples was the result of a sequencing error rather than a failure of the sampling horn.
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pandaneko
post Jan 27 2011, 02:56 PM
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Thank you for clarification of MINERVA's role.

I now have this feeling that all future asteroid landers should have something like MINERVA. I am very ignorant about hardware costs, but they do not need propulsion systems, just being pushed out (or down), so can they not afford a few MINERVA like things, not just for surface observations, but to view what a lander looks like when it comes down and do whatever it is supposed to do on touch down?

I do want to see a lander coming down, why not? That should not be very expensive, should it?

Pandaneko
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ZLD
post Jan 27 2011, 06:47 PM
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Somewhere I read that the Hyabusa development costs were around US$150m and the NSSDC claims the spacecraft alone was around $100m of that. I would imagine Minerva was relatively cheap in comparison. However, the US had planned a lander to be on Hyabusa as well but pulled out due to costs. It always seems to come down to politics in the end. Also, all missions to comets and asteroids, with exception to Hyabusa, have been flybys so far, making it difficult for a lander to have much time to explore before it would lose radio contact.
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djellison
post Jan 27 2011, 07:04 PM
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QUOTE (ZLD @ Jan 27 2011, 10:47 AM) *
Also, all missions to comets and asteroids, with exception to Hyabusa, have been flybys so far,


No - NEAR rendezvoused with, orbited and then landed on Eros.
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ZLD
post Jan 27 2011, 08:33 PM
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Doh, forgot that one. Thanks for reminding me.
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pandaneko
post Jan 30 2012, 08:41 AM
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No, I cannot provide link information as all this was analogue on local newspapers here during the past 10 days to two weeks and I do not even remember which ones exactly Anyway, :

1. Hayabusa 2 is likely to go as planned in 2014, despite the recent budgetary cut due to the shortage of money in the wake of the earthquake. Actually, the amount of budget cut is very large in % terms, but this article contained in it a JAXA comment that they would somehow manage with their own internal resources being added to the current layout.

2. A German team is going to put a mini-lander with Hayabusa 2. I remember vaguely that there was a posting about this (with the same name given to it) long time ago. The problem as I remember was that the lander was not going to be given a spin at all.

P
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pandaneko
post Feb 10 2012, 12:13 PM
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What follows is found on today's (10 Feb. 2012) Asahi newspaper digital.

JAXA will complete the design of Hayabusa 2 components by mid March this year (2012) and start manufacturing them thereafter.

At about the same time they will start electrical connection tests of comms. and control systems by having them together and if possible complete the construction of the flight model by the autumn of 2013 at the earliest.

Hayabusa 2's development budget has been almost halved to about 30x 10 to the power of 8 yen within the 2012 budgetary plan and its launch is said to be tricky, but JAXA will not change its launch schedule and will aim for a launch in 2014.

According to the plan Hayabusa 2 will be launched on board H2A in 2014 and will arrive at the carbon rich 1999 JU3 in 2018 and will return to the Earth in 2020. (Why as much as 4 years, why not 6 months like Akatsuki!, P)

Hayabusa 2's probe cost is 162x 10 to the power of 8 yen and if we include the launch cost the total cost is about 300 x 10 to the power of 8 yen. Launch windows will be open for two weeks in the summer or winter of 2014. 2015 will be left as a backup launch year.

http://www.asahi.com/digital/nikkanko/NKK201202090016.html

P
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Paolo
post Feb 10 2012, 03:38 PM
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thanks for the update pandaneko!
cutting the budget while keeping the schedule will probably mean saving on tests and cutting corners... I have a bad feeling about this...


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I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
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spdf
post Feb 10 2012, 07:34 PM
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Somewhere else they said, the 2014 launch depends whether or not they can get the lost parts of the FY 2012 budget additionally in FY 2013.

Something else. 600 kilo is too soft for the H-IIA? For Planet-C this problem made the development of IKAROS possible. Hope they could come with something cool this time, too.
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pandaneko
post Apr 25 2012, 08:48 AM
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QUOTE (spdf @ Feb 11 2012, 04:34 AM) *
Somewhere else they said, the 2014 launch depends whether or not they can get the lost parts of the FY 2012 budget additionally in FY 2013.

Something else. 600 kilo is too soft for the H-IIA? For Planet-C this problem made the development of IKAROS possible. Hope they could come with something cool this time, too.


What follows is my translation of an article in one of the local newspapers here. I have no link details here, but there are other similar articles reported by other local newspapers. So, I suspect that it does not matter a lot even if I fail to give such details. Anyway, translation goes like this:




★10 million JPY private contribution in 10 dayys to JAXA. Ardent hope for Hayabusa 2.

JAXA started inviting private contributions from general public as from 2 April 2012.

Hayabusa's story gave a profound impression on people here, but there is not enough money yet for Hayabusa 2. That is why private contributions are looked at favourably. Contribution per person is staying at around JPY 10,000. JAXA started inviting contributions as from 2 April through internet.

JAXA also started introducing F-REG contribution payment service offered by Future Commerce, and also accepting credt cards and internet banking (PAY-EASY) services such as UC card, MASTER, VISA, and other credit cards with international credibility.


If you use any one of these services you do not need to your bank. Minimum contribution is JPY 1,000, and you can choose what you are contribution for, from:

1. Hayabusa 2
2. Manned spaceship/manned launcher
3. More use of Kibo modele on ISS
4. Space science use

JAXA had amassed a total of JPY 11316000 by 12 April ( almost double that by 24 April, P) and were saying thatn you very much.

Pandaneko
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pandaneko
post May 25 2012, 07:28 AM
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Nihon Keizai Shimbun here, a financial newspaper, reported (time stamp is 25 May 2012) that JAXA started producing Hayabusa 2 and main parts will be assembled by the end of this fiscal year for testing.

Pandaneko
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pandaneko
post Jun 9 2012, 05:44 AM
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QUOTE (pandaneko @ May 25 2012, 04:28 PM) *
Nihon Keizai Shimbun here, a financial newspaper, reported (time stamp is 25 May 2012) that JAXA started producing Hayabusa 2 and main parts will be assembled by the end of this fiscal year for testing.

Pandaneko


In addition to above posting there was a similar article in today (9 June)'s Asahi Shimbun newspaper. It more or less says the same thing such as Hayabusa 2's design work was completed by the end of April this year and manufacturing started immediately. One additional information it gave is that its ion engines are so designed as to reduce output power automatically by detecting early symptons of mulfunction.

Pandaneko
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pandaneko
post Jun 25 2012, 07:09 AM
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There is an interesting feature on JAXA Japanese web site. What follows is its translation.

<New challenegs>

We are currently considering a new device for Hayabusa 2 which was not carried by Hayabusa. It is a collision device. It will be seperated from Hayabusa 2 above 1993 JU3 and when the mothersdhip hides behind the asreroid it will explode in mid air. Then, approx. 2kg collision mass will collide with the asteroid surface and create a crater of approx. a few meters insize.

After that, collection and sampling of the newly disclosed surface will be attempted. (end of translation)

I would have thought that crater making can be best and least problematically achieved by an explosive device, somehow gently placed on the asteroid surface. That would have been space mining, but this is just a collision process!

P

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tolis
post Jun 28 2012, 04:13 PM
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UNNECESSARY QUOTING REMOVED - ADMIN

Paraphrasing David Niven in "The Guns of Navarone": 'there is always a way to set off explosives. The trick is not to be around when they do.'
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