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Mercury Flyby 2
peter59
post Oct 3 2008, 03:33 PM
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First image is here:
Acquired: October 3, 2008
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3488
post Oct 3 2008, 06:01 PM
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Enlargement & enhancement of Crescent Mercury.
Attached Image


It looks like the Skinakas Basin exists after all, despite being written off, though it is still a bit too soon to jump to that conclusion. The crop & blow up I have just done shows a large feature foreshortened in the northern hemisphere. We will definitely know more tomorrow, as this afternoon's image will be approx 25% closer to Mercury than this one.

There also appears to be another large impact feature in the southern hemisphere. There is clearly a smattering of much smaller craters with bright ejecta blankets in the equatorial region.

Northern horn of crescent Mercury. Looks like there IS a large circular feature foreshortened. I think it is the suspected Skinakas Basin. Obviously we will know much more tomorrow as the second Navigation image will be down, from much closer in.
Attached Image


Every feature here is new to human eyes, very interesting & exciting.

Andrew Brown.


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"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before". Linda Morabito on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.
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Phil Stooke
post Oct 3 2008, 07:57 PM
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Here's another version of the new image.

Isn't Skinakas supposed to be a dark area? Nothing on here can be interpreted as a large impact basin or 'mare' from this image. I'm on record saying Skinakas doesn't exist - we will soon know.

Phil

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Vultur
post Oct 4 2008, 12:25 AM
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This spacecraft is really, really exciting!

Please excuse the uninformed question, but what is Skinakas?
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TheChemist
post Oct 4 2008, 12:46 AM
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QUOTE (Vultur @ Oct 4 2008, 03:25 AM) *
Please excuse the uninformed question, but what is Skinakas?


Skinakas is actually a mountaintop in Crete hosting an observatory.

A short story of the proposed "basin" (unfortunately named after it) is found here :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skinakas_Basin
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Phil Stooke
post Oct 4 2008, 07:46 PM
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The next pic is up - here's an enlarged and processed version. A nice new basin in the south but nothing like that visible in the north.

Phil

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Phil Stooke
post Oct 4 2008, 10:45 PM
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And the next...

Phil

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The new southern basin's slightly lighter interior and dark spots suggest it might be a mini-Caloris.


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3488
post Oct 4 2008, 11:49 PM
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Hi Phil,

Certainly Skinakas Does Not exist.

I really hope that the fifth image will be available soon.

That southern basin is impressive. Certainly is reminicent of a mini Caloris.

I've had a go at enlargening & sharpening each hemisphere from the original.

Northern Hemisphere enlarged.
Attached Image


Southern Hemisphere enlarged.
Attached Image


Andrew Brown.


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"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before". Linda Morabito on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.
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elakdawalla
post Oct 5 2008, 02:44 AM
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QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Oct 4 2008, 03:45 PM) *
The new southern basin's slightly lighter interior and dark spots suggest it might be a mini-Caloris.


Yeah, looks a lot like Tolstoj (that dark-rimmed bright-centered thing in the southern hemisphere on the limb in the flyby 1 departure images).

--Emily


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volcanopele
post Oct 5 2008, 03:38 AM
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That's the one I was trying to think of. Thanks, Emily. Nice central peak on that basin too.


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n1ckdrake
post Oct 5 2008, 09:38 AM
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Getting closer. smile.gif
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3488
post Oct 5 2008, 10:29 AM
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Image # 5.
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#5 Image Northern Hemisphere.
Attached Image


#5 Image Southern Hemisphere.
Attached Image


That basin is really coming into its own now. More dark spots are starting to appear on it's floor.

Andrew Brown.


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"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before". Linda Morabito on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.
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marsbug
post Oct 5 2008, 11:20 AM
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To me it looks less like a basin with dark spots, more like a basin with a mottled floor. Thats a bit pedentic I know but I wonder if there's a partial covering of dark lava flows on the basin (mottled) or if later impacts have excavated darker material (spots).


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Phil Stooke
post Oct 5 2008, 12:57 PM
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Caloris suggests an answer to your question!

Here's the last image in my style of processing.

Phil

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Phil Stooke
post Oct 5 2008, 02:55 PM
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The feature highlighted here may be another old impact basin, overlapped on the north side by a later double-ring basin.

Phil

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