IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

2 Pages V   1 2 >  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Monthly magazines & periodicals
Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Feb 13 2008, 10:47 AM
Post #1





Guests






The March issue of the British Interplanetary Society's (BIS) monthly magazine SPACEFLIGHT has an excellent 8-pages article on understanding the Moon: New Lunar Exploration by Donald A Beattie.

http://www.bis-spaceflight.com/sitesia.asp...id/1649/l/en-us
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Feb 13 2008, 06:44 PM
Post #2





Guests






Forgot to mention it also has an article preview on BepiColombo, article on COROT and Ken Kremer's viewpoint " Dawn sails towards infant asteroid worlds " wink.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Feb 21 2008, 07:41 PM
Post #3





Guests






Interesting articles in March 2008 issue of Scientific American:
- The end of cosmology: an accelerating universe wipes out traces of its own origins
- NASA's flimsy argument for nuclear weapons: nukes will not be needed to guard against dangers from space
- Stirling in Deep Space: NASA plans to replace RTGs by Stirling engines
...
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Aug 6 2008, 03:46 PM
Post #4





Guests






The October 2008 issue of "Spaceflight" magazine will carry several articles on unmanned spaceflight, among which tracking NEA, etc...
http://www.bis-spaceflight.com/sitesia.asp...id/1649/l/en-us
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
vjkane
post Aug 9 2008, 06:55 AM
Post #5


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 433
Joined: 22-April 05
Member No.: 351



The current issue of Physics Today has made the content of Ralph Lorenz's article, The Changing Face of Titan, available for free at http://ptonline.aip.org.offcampus.lib.wash...;usertype=indiv. This is simply the best summary of the Cassini Titan results that I've seen so far. The context that Ralph provides also makes a strong case for prioritizing Titan as the focus of the next Flagship mission (although obliquely by emphasizing the similarities and differences between Titan and Earth).


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
helvick
post Aug 9 2008, 07:52 AM
Post #6


Dublin Correspondent
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 1792
Joined: 28-March 05
From: Celbridge, Ireland
Member No.: 220



That appears to a protected UW link, it prompts me for a UW credential when I follow it at any rate. This direct link to it at Physics Today works for me - "The Changing Face of Titan"
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Juramike
post Aug 9 2008, 03:54 PM
Post #7


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 2676
Joined: 10-November 06
From: Pasadena, CA
Member No.: 1345



QUOTE (helvick @ Aug 9 2008, 03:52 AM) *
This direct link to it at Physics Today works for me - "The Changing Face of Titan"


Thanks!

For some reason, the figures shown in the html article are only partially shown (you'll need to click on each one to get the entire figure and extensive caption). The full range of all the illustrations and images can be seen in the pdf:
http://link.aip.org/getpdf/servlet/GetPDFS...008000034000001


-Mike


--------------------
Some higher resolution images available at my photostream: http://www.flickr.com/photos/31678681@N07/
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ngunn
post Aug 9 2008, 04:14 PM
Post #8


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 3065
Joined: 4-November 05
From: North Wales
Member No.: 542



Great article - thanks for the link.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Nov 20 2008, 07:02 PM
Post #9





Guests






BIS Spaceflight magazine December 2008 has an excellent 9-pages article by Robert April:
Where next Columbus? NASA’s future planetary exploration missions.
Overview with proposed timeline for lunar and mars missions, outer planet missions and missions of opportunity. Good photos of the Mars Science Laboratory “Scarecrow” vehicle, the next Mars rover.

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Paolo
post Nov 24 2008, 08:22 PM
Post #10


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1305
Joined: 3-August 06
From: 43° 35' 53" N 1° 26' 35" E
Member No.: 1004



The professional magazine "High Perfomance Composites" has an interesting article this month on the use of composites on the JWST


--------------------
I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Dec 5 2008, 04:18 PM
Post #11





Guests






BIS monthly Spaceflight magazine January 2009 has an article on Pioneer 10 with never before published artist impression
http://www.bis-spaceflight.com/sitesia.asp...id/1920/l/en-us

The February 2009 issue will have the MER update and all the photos made by the UMSF.com community. I’m still lobbying to get another MER cover…

Thanks again for the help of Alan Martin, Eduardo Tesheiner, Marco Di Lorenzo and Ken Kremer for their assistance in getting these images!!!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Paolo
post Jan 7 2009, 03:06 PM
Post #12


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1305
Joined: 3-August 06
From: 43° 35' 53" N 1° 26' 35" E
Member No.: 1004



For anyone interested, I have put on my website an electronic copy of my JBIS paper "ESRO and the deep space" about European planetary exploration planning in the sixties and early seventies.


--------------------
I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Feb 28 2009, 09:17 PM
Post #13





Guests






BIS Spaceflight magazine April 2009:
ExoMars and the search for life on Mars by Jeffrey Marlow
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Apr 7 2009, 03:46 PM
Post #14





Guests






BIS Spaceflight magazine May 2009:
Did Phoenix spot liquid water on Mars (Rudolf van Beest)
Kepler Space Obs Exo-planet mission (Philip Corneille)
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
tasp
post Apr 16 2009, 12:48 PM
Post #15


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 883
Joined: 30-January 05
Member No.: 162



Current issue of Scientific American has an interesting article on atmospheric loss processes.

Amazing tidbit:

Yucatan impact 65MYA removed 1/100,000 of earth's atmosphere.




Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

2 Pages V   1 2 >
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 17th April 2014 - 06:29 PM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.