IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

5 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 5 >  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Kodak moments at Pluto: Help requested
nprev
post Apr 6 2008, 07:49 PM
Post #31


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 6936
Joined: 8-December 05
From: Los Angeles
Member No.: 602



QUOTE (mcaplinger @ Apr 6 2008, 10:05 AM) *
If properly designed, they needn't introduce a failure mode.


Unfortunately, even if properly designed, 'unknown unknowns' can crop up during follow-on integration testing in most unwelcome and unexpected ways. Nobody knows of them until extremely rigorous and expensive effort has occurred, and sometimes this can't all be completed until after launch for planetary missions.

All I'm saying here is that the risk had better be worth the reward.


--------------------
A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
mcaplinger
post Apr 6 2008, 09:25 PM
Post #32


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1266
Joined: 13-September 05
Member No.: 497



QUOTE (nprev @ Apr 6 2008, 12:49 PM) *
All I'm saying here is that the risk had better be worth the reward.

It is indeed true that if this kind of thinking prevails, we will be unlikely to ever see cameras added mostly just for pretty pictures.


--------------------
Disclaimer: This post is based on public information only. Any opinions are my own.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
throop
post Apr 7 2008, 06:07 AM
Post #33


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2
Joined: 5-April 08
Member No.: 4084



QUOTE (tfisher @ Apr 5 2008, 02:57 AM) *
Question: are there any of the kernels which give sufficient ephemeris to go beyond July 26? I keep getting an error when I go past
that date...


tfisher --

Indeed, right now our trajectory kernel just goes out to July 26. We have a new kernel on the way in the next week or so that may go out further out (but I'm not sure); I'll post when I've put it into NHGV. The new kernel will tweak the timing by a couple of minutes, but will be a minor change in the big scheme.

-Henry Throop
SWRI
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
john_s
post Apr 7 2008, 03:19 PM
Post #34


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 529
Joined: 3-December 04
From: Boulder, Colorado, USA
Member No.: 117



Update on the timing- we'll be having a meeting next Tuesday, April 15th, to discuss "Kodak" ideas from UMSF and how we might incorporate them into the encounter plan, so it would be great to have your ideas before then.

Thanks again,
John.

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
djellison
post Apr 7 2008, 04:07 PM
Post #35


Administrator
****

Group: Chairman
Posts: 13702
Joined: 8-February 04
Member No.: 1



I'll sort out the 'first' and 'last' chance fit-in-a-frame family portraits and post them all as screenshots with timings etc into ppt slides and attach it, probably this weekend.

Doug
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Juramike
post Apr 7 2008, 07:11 PM
Post #36


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 2705
Joined: 10-November 06
From: Pasadena, CA
Member No.: 1345



How about a sequence of Charon sliding around Pluto? Images taken at 3 h intervals starting at 21:00 July 9 and aimed at about the midpoint (not the barycenter) between the two bodies, end of sequence is at 9:00 July 11:
[This is where the voiceover announcer states "The Pluto-Charon system is more a binary system due to the masses of the two bodies..."]

Link to sequence here.

Attached Image


Bonus: May see teaser albedo changes as Pluto rotates around.


If I had to only chose one still in the sequence for my favorite, it would be at 12:00 on July 10:

Attached Image


Link to still image here

-Mike


--------------------
Some higher resolution images available at my photostream: http://www.flickr.com/photos/31678681@N07/
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Juramike
post Apr 7 2008, 07:38 PM
Post #37


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 2705
Joined: 10-November 06
From: Pasadena, CA
Member No.: 1345



Same concept as above, but a bit earlier (starting July 7 at 8:00:00)

Attached Image


Link to sequence here.

-Mike


--------------------
Some higher resolution images available at my photostream: http://www.flickr.com/photos/31678681@N07/
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
CAP-Team
post Apr 7 2008, 07:48 PM
Post #38


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 136
Joined: 23-August 06
From: Vriezenveen, Netherlands
Member No.: 1067



QUOTE (throop @ Apr 7 2008, 08:07 AM) *
tfisher --

Indeed, right now our trajectory kernel just goes out to July 26. We have a new kernel on the way in the next week or so that may go out further out (but I'm not sure); I'll post when I've put it into NHGV. The new kernel will tweak the timing by a couple of minutes, but will be a minor change in the big scheme.

-Henry Throop
SWRI


Henry, can you post a link to a decent .bsp file with the New Horizons trajectory? I've been looking for that on NASA's NAIF site, but with no luck
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Juramike
post Apr 7 2008, 08:55 PM
Post #39


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 2705
Joined: 10-November 06
From: Pasadena, CA
Member No.: 1345



Similar sequence as above (image every 3 hours) but this time post C/A (July 19 12:00 to July 23 06:00):

Attached Image


Sequence here.

-Mike


--------------------
Some higher resolution images available at my photostream: http://www.flickr.com/photos/31678681@N07/
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
throop
post Apr 8 2008, 06:42 PM
Post #40


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2
Joined: 5-April 08
Member No.: 4084



QUOTE (CAP-Team @ Apr 7 2008, 07:48 PM) *
Henry, can you post a link to a decent .bsp file with the New Horizons trajectory? I've been looking for that on NASA's NAIF site, but with no luck


It's been requested by the mission that we not post the entire bsp trajectory online. However, send me an e-mail (throop at boulder.swri.edu) and I will put you in touch with the mission designer at APL, who will send you the spice files on an individual basis.

-Henry
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
hendric
post Apr 8 2008, 06:58 PM
Post #41


Director of Galilean Photography
***

Group: Members
Posts: 710
Joined: 15-July 04
From: Austin, TX
Member No.: 93



Dang, you take a few weeks off UMSF and all hell breaks loose. smile.gif I don't have much time to contribute anything before the 15th, unfortunately, unless I plan on skipping sleep and ignoring visiting relatives. laugh.gif

Some additional ideas I haven't seen yet thrown out:

1. Planets? Anything near to a Pluto system object that would make a good outgoing photoshoot?
2. Starfields? Does the swingby put any interesting backgrounds to the planets? The Pluto shots will be longer than most shots we've seen. Sounds like a great time to do some astrophotography!
3. What about deep sky? Any interesting nebulas, clusters, galaxies, etc we can put in the background? A quick cursory look well before and after the flyby didn't really make anything jump out on Google Sky, but I didn't do a deep check with real planetarium software.

I did see this, where Hydra should be passing just close enough to a globular cluster in Ophiuchus for a possible shot:

http://soc.boulder.swri.edu/nhgv/gv.php?su...amp;title_plot=

The tool doesn't plot globs, but you can see it at:

maps.google.com/sky enter in 17:27:45, -05:04:30 for the search

I couldn't find a decent map of Oph to get a name for it; I'll try to update later.

John, how long of a shot would you need for a decent exposure of Hydra (based on what we know now of course)? Maybe one of the cruise phase instrument checkouts could be to take a shot of the globular before we get to Pluto. wink.gif


--------------------
Space Enthusiast Richard Hendricks
--
"The engineers, as usual, made a tremendous fuss. Again as usual, they did the job in half the time they had dismissed as being absolutely impossible." --Rescue Party, Arthur C Clarke
Mother Nature is the final inspector of all quality.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
dragonchild
post Apr 8 2008, 07:30 PM
Post #42


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 1
Joined: 8-April 08
Member No.: 4086



Hello all. Not that anyone's heard of me, but I've been champing at the bit to see a close-up of Pluto since Voyager 2's Neptune flyby (I still mourn the Pluto Kuiper Express). I'm excited for a chance to provide input. But first, why "Kodak moment" when "glamour shot" is more accurate and doesn't involve a corporate trademark? Anyway, on to point:

A close up of Pluto & Charon is an obvious choice, and as a casual fan I'm not well-versed in Ralph's capabilities or the angles the New Horizons probe is willing/able to deal with. So I'm going to throw my brainstorming ideas out there for the experts to pick apart:

1) Within the last few months prior to approach, turn NH around and snap a "good-bye" shot conceptually similar to Voyager 1's family portrait. Unlike Voyager 1, though, I'm thinking a wide-angle "You Are Here" color shot of what a high noon starfield might look like on Pluto, where the Sun is as close to the middle of the image as possible (e.g. on a 1024x1024 CCD try to put Sol's center at x=y=512). Technically NH would still be a good distance from Pluto itself but for the purposes of a pretty picture a few months prior is far more convenient and I doubt the public will notice the difference.
2) On the other extreme end, try to zoom in to Pluto's horizon as much as possible; maybe capture a Charon moonrise. More specifically, not fit both in the same LORRI FOV so much as get the closest, highest-res pic that includes one or both surfaces.
3) During mapping get a trustworthy volunteer to scour the surface for any curiosities worthy of a close-up. . . I guess this is already part of the plan?
4) If by some miracle a glamour shot of a KBO is possible, that'd be nice.
5) Is it possible to capture a shot of Pluto with stars behind it? In most planetary close-ups I'm aware that sunlight reflecting off the planet surface washes out the stars but Pluto's far enough away that with the right exposure time, a relatively far picture (Pluto taking up maybe 1% of the picture) might work, assuming there's something interesting to look at behind it.

That's all I can think of off the top of my head. I'll check back because I'm curious at how hilariously unfeasible some of these might be. smile.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
hendric
post May 9 2008, 05:34 AM
Post #43


Director of Galilean Photography
***

Group: Members
Posts: 710
Joined: 15-July 04
From: Austin, TX
Member No.: 93



Here are some photo opps I found. It'll be hard to get a good picture though:

NIX passes near the Eagle Nebula: 2015 Jul 14 04:30:00
NIX passes near/through bright star field 2015 Jul 14 07:30:00
NIX passes in front of dim galaxy MCG-2-51-4, Mag 14.5, 2015 Jul 14 10:27:57
NIX passes in front of Globular Cluster M72 (!) Mag 9.4 2015 Jul 14 10:39:55 - moving really fast though
NIX passes in front of Cluster M73 Mag 9.0 2015 Jul 14 10:41:20 - moving really fast again

HYDRA passes near Globular Cluster NGC2419 Mag 10.4 2015 Jul 14:29:00
HYDRA passes in front of Open Cluster NGC2266 Mag 10 2015 Jul 14 17:35:00
HYDRA passes near IC2162 Mag 10 2015 Jul 15 09:00:00

CHARON passes in front of GSC5668:1486 Mag 4.2 (!) 2015 Jul 14 06:05:00 (slowly), exits 06:17:00
CHARON passes in front of Earth/Mercury/Mars 2015 Jul 14 14:14:00 (but most are dark, except for Mercury)


John, were these only going to be LORRI shots? .3' isn't much of a field to work with. smile.gif


--------------------
Space Enthusiast Richard Hendricks
--
"The engineers, as usual, made a tremendous fuss. Again as usual, they did the job in half the time they had dismissed as being absolutely impossible." --Rescue Party, Arthur C Clarke
Mother Nature is the final inspector of all quality.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
john_s
post May 10 2008, 06:47 PM
Post #44


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 529
Joined: 3-December 04
From: Boulder, Colorado, USA
Member No.: 117



Hi Hendric-

Thanks for that list- we'll check them out. One date/time got garbled- "HYDRA passes near Globular Cluster NGC2419 Mag 10.4 2015 Jul 14:29:00" - can you clarify?

Oh, and MVIC is fair game too, with wide field and color, but 4x resolution reduction of course.

John.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
hendric
post May 12 2008, 09:05 PM
Post #45


Director of Galilean Photography
***

Group: Members
Posts: 710
Joined: 15-July 04
From: Austin, TX
Member No.: 93



No problem John, the correct date/time is 2015 Jul 14 14:28:30. It looks like this would have to be an MVIC shot. However, HYDRA does look to be moving very fast, and if you need to hold the shutter open more than a few seconds, it looks like it would blur either the foreground or background.


--------------------
Space Enthusiast Richard Hendricks
--
"The engineers, as usual, made a tremendous fuss. Again as usual, they did the job in half the time they had dismissed as being absolutely impossible." --Rescue Party, Arthur C Clarke
Mother Nature is the final inspector of all quality.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

5 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 5 >
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 22nd July 2014 - 09:33 PM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.