IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

26 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 > »   
Reply to this topicStart new topic
EPOXI Mission News
Rich
post Mar 23 2009, 09:52 PM
Post #16


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 14
Joined: 18-March 09
From: Pasadena, CA USA
Member No.: 4677



So I just got a blessing from the Ethics office. Attached is the presentation on EPOCh observations I gave at the IEEE conference in Big Sky. Feel free to bug me with questions. I'm continuing to research the legal aspects of posting the paper here too. Stay tuned!

Attached File  EPOCh_IEEE_Presentation_umsf.pdf ( 963.67K ) Number of downloads: 308


~Rich
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
dmuller
post Mar 24 2009, 12:35 AM
Post #17


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 332
Joined: 11-April 08
From: Sydney, Australia
Member No.: 4093



Dear Rich,

QUOTE (Rich @ Mar 24 2009, 04:11 AM) *
Daniel, the SPICE kernel you have is slightly out of date. Your version was generated before TCM-14 without the TCM-14 burn. You want to be using spk_drm224_Burn-full.bin That's the latest and greatest o.d. solution.

Thanks so much for the clarification. I will incorporate the file into the next data update.


QUOTE (Rich @ Mar 24 2009, 04:11 AM) *
Where are you getting these by the way? Are they public?

Yes the SPICE kernels are public and for most missions they can be found at http://naif.jpl.nasa.gov/naif/
EPOXI, still under the Deep Impact name, is listed under the Comet and Asteroid missions at http://naif.jpl.nasa.gov/naif/data_comet.html
The Horizons system at http://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/?horizons also runs on SPICE kernels but occasionally it is not updated. At the moment it seems to use
CODE
Trajectory Name               Start UTC             Stop UTC
----------------------------- --------------------  --------------------
[...]
drm220_withTCM12-full         2008 APR 18 09:00:00  2008 DEC 09 00:00:00
  (103P/Hartley 2 soln.: #49)
drm223_with_tcms-full         2008 DEC 09 00:00:00  2012 JAN 31 00:00:00
epoxi_2008-2019.090217        2012 JAN 31 00:00:00  2019 JAN 01 00:00:00


QUOTE (Rich @ Mar 24 2009, 04:11 AM) *
I sent an e-mail to the webmaster for space.jpl.nasa.gov and asked him to add EPOXI. He hasn't gotten back to me, but I hope we'll get EPOXI in there.

Thanks.

If you wish to include timeline events, feel free to send them to me and I'll upload them in due course. Anything to create a grain of outreach for your mission :-)




--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Bjorn Jonsson
post Mar 25 2009, 12:03 AM
Post #18


IMG to PNG GOD
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 1476
Joined: 19-February 04
From: Near fire and ice
Member No.: 38



QUOTE (Rich @ Mar 19 2009, 08:46 PM) *
Let me talk with our Public Outreach people and our science team and I'll see if I can get any data released to the "world". What exactly would you guys want? .jpgs? raw binary images? Please let me know and I'll see if I can get any data released.

I myself prefer PDS formatted data and there are probably lots of people here that also prefer it but PNGs are better known and are probably the best option to make the data easier to use for lots of people. As previously discussed, PNGs are far better than JPGs due to the absence of compression artifacts and the fact that they can be 16 bits/pixel when needed. Their only drawback compared to JPGs is bigger files.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Rich
post Mar 25 2009, 08:43 PM
Post #19


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 14
Joined: 18-March 09
From: Pasadena, CA USA
Member No.: 4677



QUOTE (Bjorn Jonsson @ Mar 24 2009, 05:03 PM) *
I myself prefer PDS formatted data and there are probably lots of people here that also prefer it but PNGs are better known and are probably the best option to make the data easier to use for lots of people. As previously discussed, PNGs are far better than JPGs due to the absence of compression artifacts and the fact that they can be 16 bits/pixel when needed. Their only drawback compared to JPGs is bigger files.



Sorry Bjorn. I don't think the project will release any EPOXI data to the PDS until April and it may not get released to the public until May. You'll have to stay perched on the edge of your computer chair until then. I'll see if I can get anything released to the world, but you may have to settle for .jpgs. Sorry! .jpgs are better than nothing!

~Rich
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Rich
post Mar 27 2009, 12:15 AM
Post #20


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 14
Joined: 18-March 09
From: Pasadena, CA USA
Member No.: 4677



Mission update:

FYI, we will be taking more pictures of the Earth tomorrow in a similar fashion to how the previous Earth observations were performed (in fact, we're using the exact same sequences, fancy that). However, we will be significantly closer than the Earth Observation that took the lunar transit movie (17 Gm compared to 50 Gm (that's giga-meters, or Mkm (that's Mega-kilometers) (and yes, that's a subnested parenthetic remark)). Since the spacecraft is now north of the ecliptic plane, we will be looking down on the Earth's north pole. A simulated image of what we might see has been floating around JPL. I'll ask around to see if I can post it.

Images will be coming down Saturday.

~Rich
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
elakdawalla
post Mar 27 2009, 12:49 AM
Post #21


Bloggette par Excellence
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 4361
Joined: 4-August 05
From: Pasadena, CA, USA, Earth
Member No.: 454



Sweet. Can't wait to see the pics. --Emily


--------------------
My blog - @elakdawalla on Twitter - Please support unmannedspaceflight.com by donating here.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Rich
post Mar 30 2009, 10:21 PM
Post #22


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 14
Joined: 18-March 09
From: Pasadena, CA USA
Member No.: 4677



QUOTE (dmuller @ Mar 19 2009, 05:35 PM) *
I have noted that EPOXI is not on the Solar System Simulator (http://space.jpl.nasa.gov/) ... Deep Impact is but gives an error if you enter today's date ... which I think would be a good tool to have (both for the general public and to incorporate images into my simulations). So maybe you could suggest to the team at the Solar System Simulator to have EPOXI enabled :-)

Good luck with your mission!


dmueller: It's amazing what a simple e-mail does smile.gif EPOXI is now in the JPL Solar System Simulator! Thanks for pointing that out to us.

In other news, the images from this weekend's Earth Observation are now on the ground and they look great!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
dmuller
post Mar 31 2009, 02:51 AM
Post #23


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 332
Joined: 11-April 08
From: Sydney, Australia
Member No.: 4093



QUOTE (Rich @ Mar 31 2009, 09:21 AM) *
dmueller: It's amazing what a simple e-mail does smile.gif EPOXI is now in the JPL Solar System Simulator! Thanks for pointing that out to us.

Thanks for asking, Rich! Have updated the EPOXI Realtime Simulation accordingly.

Incidentally I figured out how to make my website tweet to my Twitter. In due course I hope to get it to periodically tweet mission updates onto my Twitter. Standby.



--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Rich
post Mar 31 2009, 11:27 PM
Post #24


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 14
Joined: 18-March 09
From: Pasadena, CA USA
Member No.: 4677



Hi all,

I just noticed a new article on the EPOXI website by the EPOCh P.I. Drake Deming:

http://epoxi.umd.edu/2science/alienmaps.shtml

Enjoy!

~Rich
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Paolo
post Apr 1 2009, 07:40 PM
Post #25


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1339
Joined: 3-August 06
From: 43 35' 53" N 1 26' 35" E
Member No.: 1004



QUOTE (Rich @ Apr 1 2009, 01:27 AM) *
I just noticed a new article on the EPOXI website by the EPOCh P.I. Drake Deming:


There was a presentation on the same subject here: http://www.astro.washington.edu/users/cowa..._lunch_talk.ppt but it has been removed. It is cached on Google in html
http://209.85.129.132/search?q=cache:wdXK3..._lunch_talk.ppt


--------------------
I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
dmuller
post Apr 4 2009, 06:55 AM
Post #26


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 332
Joined: 11-April 08
From: Sydney, Australia
Member No.: 4093



QUOTE (dmuller @ Mar 31 2009, 01:51 PM) *
Incidentally I figured out how to make my website tweet to my Twitter. In due course I hope to get it to periodically tweet mission updates onto my Twitter. Standby.

Selected trajectory information about some missions (including EPOXI) are now tweeting automatically to my Twitter account about once every day


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Rich
post Apr 7 2009, 04:44 PM
Post #27


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 14
Joined: 18-March 09
From: Pasadena, CA USA
Member No.: 4677



QUOTE (Paolo @ Apr 1 2009, 12:40 PM) *
There was a presentation on the same subject here: http://www.astro.washington.edu/users/cowa..._lunch_talk.ppt but it has been removed. It is cached on Google in html
http://209.85.129.132/search?q=cache:wdXK3..._lunch_talk.ppt


Paolo: I can't seem to find those presentations. You don't have a copy of them do you?

~Rich
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Paolo
post Apr 7 2009, 07:26 PM
Post #28


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1339
Joined: 3-August 06
From: 43 35' 53" N 1 26' 35" E
Member No.: 1004



QUOTE (Rich @ Apr 7 2009, 06:44 PM) *
Paolo: I can't seem to find those presentations. You don't have a copy of them do you?

~Rich


I don't. I only have saved the cached google copy


--------------------
I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
tedstryk
post Apr 10 2009, 06:40 PM
Post #29


Interplanetary Dumpster Diver
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 4193
Joined: 17-February 04
From: Powell, TN
Member No.: 33



FYI, Hubble is presently studying Hartley-2 to try to pin down the basic properties of the nucleus, especially the rotation period, so that the information can be incorporated into mission planning.

http://www.stsci.edu/cgi-bin/get-visit-sta...rkupFormat=html
http://archive.stsci.edu/proposal_search.p...st&id=11990


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Paolo
post Apr 12 2009, 06:48 PM
Post #30


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1339
Joined: 3-August 06
From: 43 35' 53" N 1 26' 35" E
Member No.: 1004



QUOTE (tedstryk @ Apr 10 2009, 08:40 PM) *
FYI, Hubble is presently studying Hartley-2 to try to pin down the basic properties of the nucleus,


Observations have also been carried out by Spitzer, but I have noy seen results published yet http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008sptz.prop50593L


--------------------
I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

26 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 > » 
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 23rd July 2014 - 05:46 AM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.