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Hubble Servicing Mission #4
Stu
post Jun 13 2008, 06:47 AM
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You HAVE to go look at this new video... the hairs on your neck will literally stand up.


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ilbasso
post Jun 13 2008, 02:15 PM
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QUOTE (Stu @ Jun 13 2008, 01:47 AM) *
You HAVE to go look at this new video... the hairs on your neck will literally stand up.


Bad link - can you supply another?


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ElkGroveDan
post Jun 13 2008, 02:53 PM
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Wow! Thanks for that Stu.


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jmjawors
post Jun 13 2008, 03:18 PM
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How strange. Doesn't work for me either. "Page not found."


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ugordan
post Jun 13 2008, 03:36 PM
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Interesting. At work, I could access the page holding the links to WMV and MOV versions, but the actual files were inaccessible. At home, I can't even get to that page.


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ilbasso
post Jun 24 2008, 12:51 AM
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Found it! Of course, it was on YouTube here. You can watch it in high quality in full screen mode.

This certainly brings back memories of the "old days" of the Shuttle. In the Shuttle's early days, there was a lot more launching and servicing of satellites. Of course, Challenger "proved" that we shouldn't be putting lives at risk for those kinds of missions. Hard to believe that since 1/1/2000, the only non-ISS flights have been one radar topography mission, one HST servicing mission, and Columbia's final SPACEHAB mission.


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brellis
post Jun 24 2008, 02:48 AM
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That music was cool, too.
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David
post Jun 26 2008, 02:50 AM
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Thanks! That was fun to watch. I suspect that the actual mission, as we watch it, will be less poetic but more exciting, however.

It will be strange for the Shuttle to be going somewhere just by itself, now that I think of it. Somehow having a destination with people in it has made space feel more inviting, more like a home. Going out to somewhere where there's nobody around makes the mission feel lonelier. And of course the crew is going to be a lot more cramped spending their entire mission on the orbiter!

I don't know why, since I never liked the Shuttle too much from its earliest days (I was a child when they rolled the Columbia out -- and had so many problems getting the tiles to stay stuck) but it's begun to grow on me. Perhaps it's the additional visuals necessitated by the Columbia disaster, which have allowed the whole system to be seen in all its impressive might and grace -- perhaps it's just the fact that the Shuttle is technically just a much better machine than it was back in the 1980s. Maybe it's that the Shuttle is finally doing what it was built for -- shuttling. Whatever the reason, the fact that every single Shuttle mission brings us one step closer to the final shutdown of the whole Shuttle program is making me feel wistful. Not about the Shuttle's past glory days, because I think that the Shuttle's true glory days are now; but about the fact that there aren't going to be many more of these missions to watch, and then the launchpads at Cape Canaveral are going to go silent for what seems like a long, long time.

I was just barely too young to remember the last of the Apollo missions, which means that I spent the long years from 1975 to 1981 dreaming about space flights that I had never seen. I feel for the kids who are going to be too young to remember the Shuttle, and who are going to spend their youths wondering what the Orion-Ares is going to be like. At least they'll be able to go on the net and see the twice-yearly Soyuz launches, and maybe a Shenzhou or two. It won't be quite the same, though, and maybe they will dream about the days when the big white delta-winged bird ruled the skies.
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ilbasso
post Jun 26 2008, 03:16 PM
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Well said! You don't have a feel for what a truly massive vehicle the Shuttle is until you see one up close - such as Enterprise, at the Udvar-Hazy Center of the National Air & Space Museum. That sucker is BIIIIIIIG! There's a great side-by-side comparison of Shuttle and Soyuz

Well said! You don't have a feel for what a truly massive vehicle the Shuttle is until you see one up close - such as Enterprise, at the Udvar-Hazy Center of the National Air & Space Museum. That sucker is BIIIIIIIG! There's a great side-by-side comparison of Shuttle and Soyuz here.


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Greg Hullender
post Jun 26 2008, 03:57 PM
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QUOTE (ilbasso @ Jun 26 2008, 07:16 AM) *
Well said! You don't have a feel for what a truly massive vehicle the Shuttle is until you see one up close - such as Enterprise, at the Udvar-Hazy Center of the National Air & Space Museum. That sucker is BIIIIIIIG! There's a great side-by-side comparison of Shuttle and Soyuz


Yet, as THIS image shows, those of us who grew up watching Saturn launches found the Shuttle rather disappointing.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Saturn_..._comparison.jpg

And, somehow, irrationally, really, really want to see the Ares V fly. :-)

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lyford
post Jun 26 2008, 04:09 PM
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QUOTE (ilbasso @ Jun 26 2008, 08:16 AM) *
There's a great side-by-side comparison of Shuttle and Soyuz here.

Why do I imagine the Shuttle saying to Soyuz a la Mike Myers - "GET IN MA BELLY!"


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ilbasso
post Jun 26 2008, 04:21 PM
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Conjures up visions of the capsule-eating rocket in the movie "You Only Live Twice."


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dvandorn
post Jun 26 2008, 04:26 PM
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Well.. at one point, someone did conclude that, with a little modification, you could put a civilian Salyut station *inside* the Shuttle's cargo bay and launch it into orbit that way.

Gives you some perspective, doesn't it?

-the other Doug


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ilbasso
post Jun 26 2008, 05:53 PM
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I think something like that is on the potential Shuttle launch manifest in 2010. Budget woes are preventing the Russians from building the Research Modules that would have been docked to the Russian segment of the ISS. Instead, they are now talking about a Russian "Mini-Research Module" to be launched by the Shuttle and docked to the nadir port of Zarya. I will be very interested to see the proposal for how they would get that module out of the docked Shuttle and put it at the other end of the Station. I don't think there are Canadarm 2 grapple points on the Russian segment, and I'm not sure the Canadarm 2 can reach that far. That is, unless the Shuttle were to dock at Node 3 (below Unity) and somehow move the MRM over from there.


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jmjawors
post Jun 26 2008, 06:46 PM
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There's talk of installing at least one PDGF onto the Russian segment. Not sure that solves the problem, but it would give the arm access to that half of the station.


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