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To the Cape! (part 2), For real this time!
djellison
post Jul 7 2008, 04:29 PM
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Reading http://nasa.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportu...m/2008-07-07/... scanning... found 410 new images.

Yeah - that oughtadoit smile.gif


Doug
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Stu
post Jul 7 2008, 04:33 PM
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Oh wow.... seriously, how beautiful a world is this, when it can show us such wonders as these...

Attached Image


Even better in 3D... rolleyes.gif

... and this one too...

... and another shard like this isn't something Oppy wants to be under when it crumbles and falls off the cliffside, is it?!?! ohmy.gif


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CryptoEngineer
post Jul 7 2008, 07:17 PM
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QUOTE (Stu @ Jul 7 2008, 11:33 AM) *
Oh wow.... seriously, how beautiful a world is this, when it can show us such wonders as these...


I hope Oppy spends some time examining these fallen blocks - they are samples delivered
from parts of the cliff we can't reach directly.

ce
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nprev
post Jul 7 2008, 09:02 PM
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ohmy.gif ...shee-yit...

Mind-blowing is all, Stu, thank you!!! Burning question is how such apparently delicate blade-like extrusions could survive a fall from the cliff. Is it due to the gentle gravity, or did they grow out later from atmospheric precipitates? Either possibility seems extraordinary. The third is selective weathering, which would imply significant compositional differences between layers...again, very, very interesting, and difficult to explain in detail without better data on past conditions.

What a site! smile.gif


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Juramike
post Jul 7 2008, 09:09 PM
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I wonder how friable the exposed rocks are?

Those rocks in the images Stu posted look like they've been windblasted and eroded to the point like they are fine layers of phyllo dough ready for baklava.

One gentle push and they'd all go *poof*....

('Course, they survived the impact when they fell OK). How come we don't see more chunks? Did these bounce to their present position?

It's kinda hard to tell, but it looks like they got eroded before they fell away from the cliff. But the horizontal layering on the perpindicular rock in the image looks suspect.

-Mike

[EDIT: Ha! Nick beat me to it with the erosion questions!]


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fredk
post Jul 7 2008, 09:22 PM
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QUOTE (Juramike @ Jul 7 2008, 09:09 PM) *
'Course, they survived the impact when they fell OK.

My impression, for what it's worth, was that it's been a long time since they fell. They may have been much larger when they fell, and this is all that's left after millenia of wind erosion.
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Ant103
post Jul 7 2008, 09:30 PM
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QUOTE (djellison @ Jul 7 2008, 06:29 PM) *
Reading http://nasa.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportu...m/2008-07-07/... scanning... found 410 new images.

Yeah - that oughtadoit smile.gif


Doug


Really … big blink.gif I am working on this panorama, it's hard. And a lot of work is waiting for me… Mmm, tomorrow, it's time to have a break…
Here is a preview of a part of the upcomming big pan of Cape Verde wink.gif.



Stu : your anaglyphs are astounding.


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Juramike
post Jul 7 2008, 09:45 PM
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QUOTE (fredk @ Jul 7 2008, 05:22 PM) *
My impression, for what it's worth, was that it's been a long time since they fell. They may have been much larger when they fell, and this is all that's left after millenia of wind erosion.


So the question is: If these blocks down here have fragile exposed sheet-like structures after being eroded by wind, shouldn't the cliff faces also have fragile sheet-like structures?

Are they in the same erosion environment?

Or are the cliff faces too high to have been subjected to millenia of bouncing grains. Maybe the foot of the cliff will have these??





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Stu
post Jul 7 2008, 10:42 PM
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QUOTE (Ant103 @ Jul 7 2008, 10:30 PM) *
Stu : your anaglyphs are astounding.


Thanks, that means a lot coming from one of our foremost Imagemages... smile.gif

Here's another one...


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fredk
post Jul 7 2008, 11:05 PM
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QUOTE (Juramike @ Jul 7 2008, 09:45 PM) *
Maybe the foot of the cliff will have these??

I think you can see them at the foot of the cliff in some places, like near the left side of the image I added to this post.
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jamescanvin
post Jul 7 2008, 11:34 PM
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Completed pan of Cape Verde, what a view! cool.gif



James


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Stu
post Jul 7 2008, 11:45 PM
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That's gorgeous James, absolutely gorgeous...

One final close-up of the luvverly, luvverly layers before I head off to bed... up again in 5 hrs... rolleyes.gif

Attached Image


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Juramike
post Jul 8 2008, 02:44 AM
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Beautiful work, James!

I just spent some time slowly panning back and forth across your full res image....Imagining trying to climb the cliffs, looking for handholds and foot holds, maybe whipping out a rock hammer and chipping at some layers.

Your mosaic really brings Mars closer!


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Juramike
post Jul 8 2008, 02:46 AM
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QUOTE (fredk @ Jul 7 2008, 07:05 PM) *
I think you can see them at the foot of the cliff in some places, like near the left side of the image I added to this post.


Oh yeah!! And looking at the big mosaic it looks like the lower sets of layers really got eaten into by the wind.

Curious to know if those particular layers are softer, or just lower to the ground and more accessible to saltating sand.


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Shaka
post Jul 8 2008, 04:50 AM
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28.2% of one, and 71.8% of the other. cool.gif

The blocks among the scree are almost certainly not from the bottom of the exposure.


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