IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

5 Pages V  « < 2 3 4 5 >  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Late 'night' Phoenix Observations.
3488
post Aug 17 2008, 10:14 AM
Post #46


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 47
Joined: 27-June 08
From: Ashford, Kent, United Kingdom.
Member No.: 4244



Hi everyone,

Nice observation.

Sol 80 @ 00:08 HRS LMST looking North.

I have cropped & enlarged the central due north position of said image.
Attached Image


1,303 Km / 809 miles to the North Pole on mars.

Andrew Brown.


--------------------
"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before". Linda Morabito on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
belleraphon1
post Aug 17 2008, 03:48 PM
Post #47


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 741
Joined: 29-December 05
From: NE Oh, USA
Member No.: 627



QUOTE (Astro0 @ Aug 6 2008, 08:00 AM) *
Belatedly, here's a movie depicting Phoenix's midnight sun.

Remember it's done as an artist's view, not the pure science.
I leave that stuff to the smart people on the forum.

Enjoy
Astro0


Boy, am I behind... (so much going on hard to keep up... ain't that great smile.gif )

Beautiful movie.... watched it for the first time today.

One of my cats, Hansel, was in my lap. When the music started her head darted up and she watched the scene intently, then slowly moved out of my lap onto the pc table and tried to tap the moving sun image of the pc screen. So, she loved it too!!!! laugh.gif

Thanks Astro0... definite keeper!!!

Craig


Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
AndyG
post Aug 18 2008, 12:58 PM
Post #48


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 574
Joined: 20-April 05
Member No.: 279



QUOTE (3488 @ Aug 17 2008, 11:14 AM) *
1,303 Km / 809 miles to the North Pole on mars.

Once the sun properly sets at this latitude, there's chances to see Phobos rising to a (bizarre) couple of degrees above the horizon - I wonder if we'll see any imagery of it?

Andy
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
jmknapp
post Aug 18 2008, 02:46 PM
Post #49


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1449
Joined: 9-February 04
From: Columbus OH USA
Member No.: 13



QUOTE (AndyG @ Aug 18 2008, 08:58 AM) *
Once the sun properly sets at this latitude, there's chances to see Phobos rising to a (bizarre) couple of degrees above the horizon - I wonder if we'll see any imagery of it?


Did you have specific dates that would be good? I just ran a quick check & it looks like Phobos max elevation for any given pass ranges from 0-1.5 degrees, so there has to be the coincidence of a "high" elevation when the sun is set. For example, on Sept. 15 Phobos rises just 0.1 deg when the sun is 0.9 deg below the horizon. On Nov. 19 Phobos rises 1.4 deg with the sun 7.1 deg below the horizon. At least that's what my software says.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Paul Fjeld
post Sep 2 2008, 08:55 PM
Post #50


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 150
Joined: 3-June 08
From: McLean, VA
Member No.: 4177



At last! Late night shot through the legs of Phoenix by the RAC. This one was taken at 2:09 am when the sun was about 3 degrees above the horizon (according to Starry Night...), so it is near to what we might have seen had they taken the shot in the week after landing. Eerie having little shadow - so the sky is brightly lit by the low sun, but the sun's direct light is attenuated so much that what shadow it casts is washed out? The later shots, taken two hours later, show more distinct shadows with the sun about 11 degrees up.

Neat pictures. Look forward to the color views our bright members will make... smile.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Paul Fjeld
post Sep 2 2008, 09:08 PM
Post #51


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 150
Joined: 3-June 08
From: McLean, VA
Member No.: 4177



Didn't see it earlier, but the RAC took this one through the legs at 10:30pm on SOL 96 with the sun about 1 1/2 degrees up. Very eerie...
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Stu
post Sep 2 2008, 09:27 PM
Post #52


The Poet Dude
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 5548
Joined: 15-March 04
From: Kendal, Cumbria, UK
Member No.: 60



Cute little animation here on my Gallery page if anyone wants a look...

shifting shadows


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Paul Fjeld
post Sep 3 2008, 12:07 AM
Post #53


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 150
Joined: 3-June 08
From: McLean, VA
Member No.: 4177



Very cool Stu!

I thought those were RGBs so a color shot could be attempted, but can't suss out the UA lg#s.

BTW: did the question of frost on the gear strut ever get "resolved"? The low light in these shots makes it look like those are big clumps sticking to the gear. My current wondering is if the heat of the engines didn't warm up the dust so that it got a bit sticky, just like the rasp maybe heated up the ice samples and gave them some stick. Then the question of frost - the clumps look lighter - gets answered, how? That north gear is mostly shadowed so the metal keeps colder than the surface and the frost can stick around?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
slinted
post Sep 3 2008, 12:17 AM
Post #54


Member
***

Group: Admin
Posts: 468
Joined: 11-February 04
From: USA
Member No.: 21



QUOTE (Paul Fjeld @ Sep 2 2008, 04:07 PM) *
I thought those were RGBs so a color shot could be attempted, but can't suss out the UA lg#s.

They were RGB-lit, but from what I could see, the lights didn't brighten up the scene enough to make a color image. The ambient light is just too bright for the colored lamps to make a significant contribution (at least to the level of detail visible in the raw images).
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Paul Fjeld
post Sep 3 2008, 12:59 AM
Post #55


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 150
Joined: 3-June 08
From: McLean, VA
Member No.: 4177



Oh, right. The RAC doesn't have filters - just the lights.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Gray
post Sep 3 2008, 01:09 PM
Post #56


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 242
Joined: 17-February 04
From: Ohio, USA
Member No.: 34



Those images look to me like flash photos taken inside a cave. Very cool.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
3488
post Sep 6 2008, 07:27 PM
Post #57


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 47
Joined: 27-June 08
From: Ashford, Kent, United Kingdom.
Member No.: 4244



It is very cool,

Also this @ 22:30 LMST on Sol 96. Holy Cow in complete shade.
Attached Image


Andrew Brown.


--------------------
"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before". Linda Morabito on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
imipak
post Sep 7 2008, 11:27 AM
Post #58


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 643
Joined: 23-December 05
From: Forest of Dean
Member No.: 617



Nice image, 3488. The more time passes, the more the spotty leg puzzles me. I've not seen any suggested mechanisms that account for three key features (as I remember them, happy to be corrected!):

1. The phenomena is only apparent on one leg, of three;
2. The "spots" were apparent in the first post-landing images, but their apparent size and density increased in the first couple of weeks on the surface;
3. The existing lumps don't appear to have continued growing as the sun sinks lower in the sky and (presumably) local surface temperatures decrease; they reached their current state and stopped.

Dust and soil blown around at landing time, perhaps with a thin melted surface film of water, was been the proposed mechanism that most appealed to me, but it doesn't seem to account for points (1) and (2).

What have I missed?


--------------------
--
Viva software libre!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
3488
post Sep 7 2008, 11:35 AM
Post #59


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 47
Joined: 27-June 08
From: Ashford, Kent, United Kingdom.
Member No.: 4244



Hi imipak,

My guess is that the sublimation has ceased from Holy Cow & Snow Queen.

I think that you are correct linking the cessation of the growth of the globules on the leg with the lowering Sun.

'Night time' temperatures have lowered on average 5 C / 9 F since the Solstice & that is maybe enough to make the difference. Either way, the end game for Phoenix is drawing closer now but hopefully, she will survive to mid - late November when solar conjunction is nearing & power levels will be desperate.

We are already seeing daily morning H2O frosts now, maybe in the shadows persisting into the afternoons.

Below I've cropped & enlarged the Sun just beneath the horizon on Sol 101 @ 01:23 HRS LMST.
Attached Image


Andrew Brown.


--------------------
"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before". Linda Morabito on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
centsworth_II
post Sep 7 2008, 03:24 PM
Post #60


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2084
Joined: 28-December 04
Member No.: 132



QUOTE (imipak @ Sep 7 2008, 07:27 AM) *
Nice image, 3488. The more time passes, the more the spotty leg puzzles me....

It's strange, and irritating, that the strut close to the camera is pristine, while those intriguing splotches absolutely cover the more distant leg, too far away to get a good look.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

5 Pages V  « < 2 3 4 5 >
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 21st December 2014 - 12:04 PM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.