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Mission Success Criteria
dvandorn
post Jul 22 2008, 07:27 AM
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It's currently halfway through Sol 56. We have, to this point, accomplished the following (please correct me if I'm missing anything):

- Full Mission Success stereo color pan of the entire landing site

- Full RAC coverage of what it can view under the lander

- One TEGA run

- One WCL run

- Two OM images of soil

- Zero AFM images of soil

- Programmed observations of winds and temperatures

How far, with only 34.5 sols left in the 90-sol primary mission, does that leave us from accomplishing the Mission Success Criteria? (Capitalized so that, as Steve Squyres noted, if you fail to accomplish them you'll know that You Have Failed.)

I understand that things are working well enough that we can likely count on a good 30 sols of full mission activity past the base 90-sol mission. Even at figuring that in, we appear to be nearly halfway through Phoenix's entire useful lifetime.

Are we seriously in jeopardy of failing to achieve some of the success criteria?

-the other Doug


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jamescanvin
post Jul 22 2008, 08:38 AM
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For reference

QUOTE
Minimum Mission Success

1. Land successfully on the surface of Mars and achieve a power safe state.
2. Acquire a partial 120° monochromatic panorama of the landing site.
3. Provide samples of the surface soil as well as samples from one depth beneath the surface to either
TEGA or MECA wet chemistry.
4. If TEGA, analyze at least 2 soil samples to create a profile of H2O (in the form of hydrated minerals,
adsorbed water, or possibly ice at the deepest level) and mineral abundances near the surface. It shall
also analyze an atmospheric sample in its mass spectrometer.
5. If MECA, analyze the wet chemistry of 2 soil samples.
6. Document all non-atmospheric samples and their collection locations with images.

Full Mission Success

1. Land successfully on the surface of Mars and achieve a power safe state.
2. Acquire a true color (RGB), 360° panorama of the landing site
3. Obtain calibrated optical spectra of at least 3 locations that include both rocks and soil.
4. Provide temperature and pressure measurements throughout landed surface operations at a frequency
that determines key atmospheric properties.
5. Provide samples of the surface soil, and samples from two depths beneath the surface, to both TEGA
and MECA.
6. Use TEGA to analyze at least 3 soil samples to create a profile of H2O (in the form of hydrated
minerals, adsorbed water, or possibly ice at the deepest level) and mineral abundances near the
surface. It shall also analyze an atmospheric sample in its mass spectrometer.
7. Use MECA to analyze the wet chemistry of at least 3 soil samples. It shall also analyze 3 additional
samples in its microscopy station.
8. Document all 9 non-atmospheric samples and their collection locations (before and after sampling)
with images.


http://trs-new.jpl.nasa.gov/dspace/bitstre...1/1/07-0267.pdf


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