IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

8 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 > »   
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Virtual Viking, Images and animations of the Viking landing sites
tedstryk
post Nov 23 2008, 03:07 AM
Post #16


Interplanetary Dumpster Diver
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 4246
Joined: 17-February 04
From: Powell, TN
Member No.: 33



QUOTE (PhilCo126 @ Nov 22 2008, 02:19 PM) *
The goldmine(s) for Viking Lander images:
Lander Picture Catalogs of Experiment Data Record - NASA Reference Publication 1068

Why? The images are all on the PDS.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Nov 23 2008, 12:56 PM
Post #17





Guests






Does one need a password to access the Planetary Data System ( PDS ) ?
http://pds.jpl.nasa.gov/
huh.gif

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
djellison
post Nov 23 2008, 05:08 PM
Post #18


Administrator
****

Group: Chairman
Posts: 13849
Joined: 8-February 04
Member No.: 1



No.

http://pds-geosciences.wustl.edu/geo/vl1_v...vl_0002/browse/


http://pds-geosciences.wustl.edu/geo/vl1_v...vl_0001/browse/



Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Nov 23 2008, 05:16 PM
Post #19


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5807
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



I prefer this source, from which images can be selected by sol, or by clicking on mosaics for each camera to select pictures of a given area.

http://pds-imaging.jpl.nasa.gov/vikingl/vl_images.html

Phil


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Apr 21 2009, 02:23 PM
Post #20


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5807
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



The Viking 1 site mapped in a new way... This is the polar projection of the landing site, which I posted some time ago, reprojected to HiRISE geometry. In this comparison, HiRISE is at the top and the reprojected Viking pan is below it. Mapping from ground-level images is very difficult, and grotesque distortions are inevitable, but this is the best I can do after several weeks and far too many iterations. The original is detailed enough to make a full photomap of the sampling area, and in that area the mosaic is controlled to fit the original mission map.

Phil

Attached Image


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post May 11 2009, 07:30 PM
Post #21


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5807
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



I'm still perfecting that reprojected Viking 1 site map. Meanwhile here's a composite of images showing surface changes at the Viking 1 site. There were a few changes in soil patches on the lander itself as well, otherwise these were the only changes seen by Viking 1. For the first one, of course, the change I'm drawing attention to is the erosion by wind of Conical Pile 4 late in the mission. Several other artificial piles of soil were made and monitored but didn't change.

Phil

Attached Image


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post May 23 2009, 03:46 AM
Post #22


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5807
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



Another of the things we can do so much better now than in the old days...

The Vikings carried mirrors on the sampler arm, and one of them could be viewed by one of the cameras to see underneath the lander. Seven images of the mirror were taken by Viking 1 on sols 528, 550, 582 and 594. They can be combined to produce a mosaic of the area underneath Engine 2 (the one right under the cameras) to look at the erosion effects of the engine during landing. The version made during Viking times was really bad! But now we can do it much better. This image contains two separate mosaics - they are supposed to fit together, but right now I don't have the old mosaic with me to compare and figure it out. They have been reversed to take the reflection into account and enlarged 2x. The bottom mosaic shows an erosion pit where loose soil has been blown away to reveal harder crusty stuff underneath. (EDIT: I found the location and fixed the mosaic)

Phil

Attached Image


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post May 23 2009, 10:59 PM
Post #23


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5807
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



Here's the Viking 2 mosaic underneath Engine 2. The images were taken on sols 57 and 555.

Phil

Attached Image


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
lyford
post May 24 2009, 01:30 AM
Post #24


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1264
Joined: 18-December 04
From: San Diego, CA
Member No.: 124



Those are truly special, Phil!


--------------------
Lyford Rome
"Zis is not nuts, zis is super-nuts!" Mathematician Richard Courant on viewing an Orion test
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
nprev
post May 24 2009, 01:54 AM
Post #25


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 7141
Joined: 8-December 05
From: Los Angeles
Member No.: 602



They are indeed! smile.gif I'm gonna start saving my pennies for your forthcoming atlas...


--------------------
A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post May 26 2009, 01:58 AM
Post #26


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5807
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



I have edited my post above with the Viking 1 mirror mosaic - took out the old attachment and replaced it with one showing the two halves joined correctly. I found one 'accidental' mirror image from Viking 2 as well, that adds to coverage there, but I don't know exactly where the new frame fits. It doesn't actually overlap the mosaic. For reference these mirror mosaics cover an area roughly 20 by 60 cm across.

Phil


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post May 28 2009, 09:07 PM
Post #27


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5807
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



Another bit of Viking history now we are all thinking about the amazing views out past Endeavour crater in the Opportunity thread. After the Viking landing sites had been chosen in 1973 people began to have concerns about their safety. They looked for some extra-safe sites (as determined from earth-based radar) near the equator, the so-called C sites (A sites were at 20 north for the first mission, B sites at 44 north for the second mission. C would be used if A crashed or if all sites at those latitudes looked too rough in Viking images). C1 was just north of Capri Chasma, C3 at Schiaparelli crater, but C2 was at Meridiani. Here's a map showing three possible ellipses described in the minutes of the Landing Site Staff during Viking site certification in 1976. The top one just touched Endeavour crater.

Phil

Attached Image


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
nprev
post May 29 2009, 12:23 AM
Post #28


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 7141
Joined: 8-December 05
From: Los Angeles
Member No.: 602



Fascinating (not a word I use lightly), Phil; did not know that.

One can only imagine how the Mars exploration strategy might have evolved had V1 landed in Meridiani on top of a nice piece of sedimentary pavement...


--------------------
A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post May 29 2009, 01:16 AM
Post #29


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5807
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



There's a lot of good stuff in those committee minutes. My next step is to go through the Viking landing Site Working Group minutes from c. 1970-1974.

Phil


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
vikingmars
post May 29 2009, 10:19 AM
Post #30


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 658
Joined: 19-February 05
From: Close to Meudon Observatory in France
Member No.: 172



QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ May 28 2009, 10:07 PM) *
Another bit of Viking history now we are all thinking about the amazing views out past Endeavour crater in the Opportunity thread. After the Viking landing sites had been chosen in 1973 people began to have concerns about their safety. They looked for some extra-safe sites (as determined from earth-based radar) near the equator, the so-called C sites (A sites were at 20 north for the first mission, B sites at 44 north for the second mission. C would be used if A crashed or if all sites at those latitudes looked too rough in Viking images). C1 was just north of Capri Chasma, C3 at Schiaparelli crater, but C2 was at Meridiani. Here's a map showing three possible ellipses described in the minutes of the Landing Site Staff during Viking site certification in 1976. The top one just touched Endeavour crater.

Phil


Thanks Phil !
And to complement your good info, here is what was written a while ago + how Meridiani would have looked to the Viking Lander camera.
http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.p...st&p=105769
Enjoy ! smile.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

8 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 > » 
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 21st November 2014 - 07:11 PM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.