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MARDI microphone, maybe possibly it'll be turned on?
elakdawalla
post Sep 18 2008, 03:52 PM
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Leonard David reports that "the Phoenix lander team is going forward with turning on the spacecraft’s microphone."

I'm working on finding out more details. (For instance, I want to know if this also means they'll get to use the camera itself, maybe get a different perspective on Holy Cow, if the camera's pointing the right way.) In the meantime, enjoy hearing what Bill Nye and others would sound like on Mars before they asphyxiated.

Yay!

Emily


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Stu
post Sep 18 2008, 03:56 PM
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That's fantastic news! Being able to play kids the sound of the wind blowing on Mars would be brilliant! As you so eloquently put it, "Yay!" smile.gif

Having said that... and without wanting to blow on anyone's chips here ... is this a sign that the Phoenix team is maybe sensing that the sand is really rushing through the hourglass now, and the time has come to start trying cool and unusual things..?


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ugordan
post Sep 18 2008, 04:24 PM
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QUOTE (Stu @ Sep 18 2008, 05:56 PM) *
is this a sign that the Phoenix team is maybe sensing that the sand is really rushing through the hourglass now, and the time has come to start trying cool and unusual things..?

It's probably the realization that at this point, turning MARDI on can't jeopardize the success of the mission anymore so they might as well do it. I don't see it as running against the clock. I'm glad they decided to turn it on, was hoping it would happen sometime during the extended mission.


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fredk
post Sep 18 2008, 05:03 PM
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I wonder if it will be sensitive enough to hear wind directly? Maybe some cavity somewhere on Phoenix will resonate in the wind and make a whistle or hum? Maybe the sound of the solar arrays flapping in the wind would be easier to hear, if it could carry directly through the body of Phoenix?
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elakdawalla
post Sep 18 2008, 05:18 PM
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It's hard to know what, if anything, it'll hear; it was intended to listen to descent noises (whoosh and all that), so is probably pretty insensitive to the level of sound that currently prevails at the landing site -- but we'll see. We also have to see if it still works or not. So -- hope, but don't expect, to hear anything!

--Emily


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ElkGroveDan
post Sep 18 2008, 05:22 PM
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It would be great if they could acquire audio during soil sampling and ice scraping.


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ugordan
post Sep 18 2008, 05:27 PM
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The motors in the robotic arm should produce a buzzing sound when operated, right?


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elakdawalla
post Sep 18 2008, 10:21 PM
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OK, here's a challenge for someone(s) with a facility for 3D visualization. The question is, what would MARDI be looking at if it took an image right now? More specifically, could it see any of the ice patches in Holy Cow? Attached is an image of the underside of the lander, in which you can see MARDI (it's the thing covered with a blue cover, actually a glove, just like the glove the technician is wearing!) I've tried to puzzle it out but am afraid of errors and am hoping a couple of people here can try to figure it out independently. Also relevant: its FOV is 66 degrees.

--Emily
Attached thumbnail(s)
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Astro0
post Sep 18 2008, 10:39 PM
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Perhaps we'll hear this... rolleyes.gif
Attached File  mardi_1stsound.mp3 ( 25.1K ) Number of downloads: 729


Sorry...couldn't resist. laugh.gif
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djellison
post Sep 18 2008, 11:01 PM
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OK - If Phoenix is like a clock...

Solar Panels are at 2.30 and 8.30
The arm is mounted at about 1.30
MARDI looks to be at about 7 - sort of behind where the elbow of the arm was when folded flat.

http://www.lockheedmartin.com/data/assets/14819.gif
http://www.lockheedmartin.com/data/assets/14845.jpg

I would GUESS - the area marked green...possibly getting a corner of one bit of the exposed stuff - but with MARDI being pointing slight away from straight down, I'm not confident.




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PDP8E
post Sep 18 2008, 11:47 PM
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doug,


In the second image you posted above ( http://www.lockheedmartin.com/data/assets/14845.jpg) it appears the telltale 'cord' has the bend (or similar) that we have seen from the first Sol it was deployed....

cheers


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dshaffer
post Sep 19 2008, 01:13 AM
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QUOTE (djellison @ Sep 18 2008, 06:01 PM) *
OK - If Phoenix is like a clock...

Solar Panels are at 2.30 and 8.30
The arm is mounted at about 1.30
MARDI looks to be at about 7 - sort of behind where the elbow of the arm was when folded flat.

http://www.lockheedmartin.com/data/assets/14819.gif
http://www.lockheedmartin.com/data/assets/14845.jpg

I would GUESS - the area marked green...possibly getting a corner of one bit of the exposed stuff - but with MARDI being pointing slight away from straight down, I'm not confident.


Doug - I had thought that MARDI was fixed-focus (probably at Infinity) - so anything a few feet away would be out-of-focus, no?
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elakdawalla
post Sep 19 2008, 01:15 AM
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You would think that, but actually it does pretty well at short distances. See the bottom of this blog entry.

--Emily


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dshaffer
post Sep 19 2008, 01:22 AM
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QUOTE (elakdawalla @ Sep 18 2008, 09:15 PM) *
You would think that, but actually it does pretty well at short distances. See the bottom of this blog entry.

--Emily



Thanks - I had missed that BLOG entry.

Mardi has an excellent depth of field.
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mcaplinger
post Sep 19 2008, 03:33 AM
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QUOTE (djellison @ Sep 18 2008, 04:01 PM) *
MARDI looks to be at about 7 - sort of behind where the elbow of the arm was when folded flat.

FWIW, MARDI is just about exactly behind the met mast as seen from the SSI, and it's pointed 22 degrees outward from nadir.


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