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Future Planetary Exploration
Paolo
post May 5 2011, 08:23 PM
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NASA just announced the three candidates for the next Discovery mission:
- A Mars Geophysical Monitoring Station
- the Titan Mare Explorer (yes!!!!!)
- the Comet Hopper
see http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/na...-121343498.html


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I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

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Paolo
post May 6 2011, 05:21 AM
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more info on GEMS http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMDI43A1938B
and an image of the Phoenix-based lander http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/mars/mul...a/pia13990.html


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I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
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Paolo
post May 7 2011, 04:50 PM
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and an interesting presentation on the "Comet Hopper"
ftp://ftp.astro.umd.edu/pub/jess/CHopper_...9_JMS_final.ppt
turns out GEMS is the only solar-powered proposal of the three candidates


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I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
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Paolo
post May 25 2011, 05:17 PM
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NASA to Announce New Planetary Science Mission
NF3 will be announced in a few hours. place your last bets...


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I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
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volcanopele
post May 25 2011, 05:29 PM
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Scientifically, I prefer SAGE. I'm very excited to see a return to the Venusian surface. Institutionally, I prefer OsirisREX since the SciOps center would be here in Tucson at the old Phoenix building. However, knowing NASA, it'll be MoonRISE.


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Paolo
post May 25 2011, 05:40 PM
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my favorite would definitely be SAGE, then Osiris, then MoonRISE. No matter what, I still find the Moon boring...


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Juramike
post May 25 2011, 06:40 PM
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SAGE...I like fuzzy planets.


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charborob
post May 25 2011, 07:13 PM
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If the word "Planetary" in "New Planetary Science Mission" is to be taken literally, then it must mean a Venus mission, since neither the Moon nor an asteroid are considered planets.
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Deimos
post May 25 2011, 08:05 PM
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Just posted at NASA multimedia:
http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/videogaller...dia_id=90571421

OSIRIS-REx: Journey to an Asteroid

OSIRIS-REx will pluck samples from an asteroid and return them to Earth. The samples could help explain our solar system's formation and how life began. OSIRIS-REx (short for Origins-Spectral Interpretation-Resource Identification-Security-Regolith Explorer) has a planned launch date in 2016. When it returns to Earth, scheduled for 2023, it will be the first U.S. mission to carry samples from an asteroid back to our planet.
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djellison
post May 25 2011, 08:08 PM
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QUOTE (charborob @ May 25 2011, 11:13 AM) *
If the word "Planetary" in "New Planetary Science Mission" is to be taken literally, then it must mean a Venus mission, since neither the Moon nor an asteroid are considered planets.


Planetary is essentially solar system exploration. You can play a semantics game if you like - but that's what it is. Discovery program missions to comets, asteroids, moon, mars and elsewhere are all 'Planetary' in the budget.

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Deimos
post May 25 2011, 08:17 PM
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The actual announcement of OSIRIS-REX is up now:
http://www.nasa.gov/topics/solarsystem/fea...osiris-rex.html.

I have no stake in any (but I do like atmospheres). But, semantics aside, this sounds planetary enough for my tastes.
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Paolo
post May 28 2011, 01:15 PM
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QUOTE (ynyralmaen @ Feb 25 2011, 11:47 PM) *
Marco Polo, which narrowly lost out in the competition for consideration for an earlier M1 or M2 mission slot, is through again.


with Hayabusa 2 and OSIRIS-Rex approved I doubt that Marco Polo will get a chance to fly. I believe a more sensitive proposition would be for ESA to finance its contribution to one of these mission.
Anyway, there was recently an interesting paper in Astronomy & Astrophysics (with free access) on the target body of Marco Polo:
New observations of asteroid (175706) 1996 FG3, primary target of the ESA Marco Polo-R mission


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I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
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vjkane
post Jul 19 2011, 12:33 AM
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There's a new proposal for the next stages in exploring Europa coming from a NASA Europa Science Definition Team. The basic idea is to carry only geophysical instruments that must make measurements from orbit on an orbiter. High data rate remote sensing -- presumably cameras and imaging spectrometers -- would be carried on a Jupiter orbiter that would make multiple flybys of Europa.

You can read an EPSC abstract here. I have some additional analysis at my blog here.


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machi
post Mar 15 2012, 09:47 PM
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Bad news from Russian space science program - Izvestia (in Russian language), Google translation.

It looks, that Russian Solar system research is gone for next few years (except cooperation in ExoMars project).


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machi
post Mar 16 2012, 08:52 PM
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And some better news from Russian space program.
Missions are not canceled, but postponed. They want to work on reliability issues, which is good idea.


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