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Members' observations, Things we see through our humble 'scopes...
Stu
post Mar 4 2009, 11:46 PM
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Gorgeous clear night in Kendal tonight, the Moon looked spectacular in my 4.5" scope. Took some pix, didn't turn out too bad...

Attached Image


Saturn looked really nice too, with at least 3 of the "other" moons visible. smile.gif


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ElkGroveDan
post Mar 5 2009, 12:24 AM
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QUOTE
Members' observations, Things we see through our humble 'scopes...


Stu, I assume you mean when the telescope is pointed at the sky.


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nprev
post Mar 5 2009, 01:37 AM
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laugh.gif ...okay, Dan, that made my wife draw the shades...

Nice pic, Stu. Was that an eyepiece shot, or did you mount a cam at the objective?

(Sigh.) I gotta drag my Celestron 8 out to the Mojave when I have time...the light pollution in LA just plain sucks.


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Stu
post Mar 5 2009, 06:32 AM
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That was a good ol' fashioned hold-the-camera-up-to-the-eyepiece-and-breathe-in-to-try-to-keep-it-still-while-taking-the-pic shot smile.gif


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Thu
post Mar 5 2009, 04:01 PM
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QUOTE (Stu @ Mar 5 2009, 01:32 PM) *
That was a good ol' fashioned hold-the-camera-up-to-the-eyepiece-and-breathe-in-to-try-to-keep-it-still-while-taking-the-pic shot smile.gif

In my case, I found it easier to hold the camcorder up to the eyepiece, record a movie to be captured to the PC later then use a frame grabber to extract the best images. The camcorder's zoom could also be used for some extra magnification smile.gif
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Stu
post Mar 5 2009, 09:00 PM
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More shots from tonight...

http://cumbriansky.wordpress.com/2009/03/05/more-moonshots

Especially pleased with the second one smile.gif


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ElkGroveDan
post Mar 5 2009, 10:06 PM
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I've also found that a good digital SLR one a tripod with a 200mm or 300mm lens can take some amazing images. Be sure and set it for the highest resolution so that if necessary you can crop in closer and still have a decent image. You just need to watch for lens flare on a long lens with something as bright as the full moon.


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dburt
post Mar 5 2009, 11:01 PM
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QUOTE (Stu @ Mar 5 2009, 02:00 PM) *
...Especially pleased with the second one smile.gif

Yes, if you look at that one closely, it even shows the shadow of a famous lunar fault (Rupes Recta or "Straight Wall") to the right of the terminator in the center. Nice work capturing that handheld.

--- HDP Don

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dvandorn
post Mar 6 2009, 02:37 AM
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And it's dawn at Fra Mauro, Bonpland and Parry... smile.gif

-the other Doug


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hendric
post Mar 6 2009, 06:18 PM
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QUOTE (nprev @ Mar 4 2009, 07:37 PM) *
(Sigh.) I gotta drag my Celestron 8 out to the Mojave when I have time...the light pollution in LA just plain sucks.


The Moon and the planets cut through light pollution fairly well. I run a quarterly "star party" in my neighborhood, and people are constantly amazed by what they can see on the moon. It's a quite pretty object!


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nprev
post Mar 6 2009, 08:12 PM
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Yeah, I can always pick up Venus & Jupiter, and Mars at opposition, anyhow. Saturn is usually a challenge to find from here, though, esp. because the constellations are pretty much invisible in the damned ugly ubiquitous orange sodium skyglow.

I gotta get a job in Tucson. There's a town that knows how to minimize light pollution! (Enlightened self-interest due to the proximity of Kitt Peak, of course...)


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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Mar 7 2009, 08:04 AM
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Well I have to admit I've bought my first refractor to view Mars back in 1976... Nowadays I've upgraded to an 18cm refractor and Jupiter is my favorite target wink.gif
Although a large Dobson is the instrument to watch DeepSky objects, I plan to go for a Refractor "Kometensucher" of 20.3 cm ...
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Gladstoner
post Mar 7 2009, 08:36 AM
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Mar 16 2009, 06:47 PM
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For those who're interested, check out how Saturn's rings will show up the coming months...
http://www.curtrenz.com/astronomical.html

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ngunn
post Mar 16 2009, 10:06 PM
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That is interesting. From here we get to see the unlit side of the rings for a month or so (not that I will be able to observe it). I had been wondering if that would happen.

BTW just been out with my tiny telescope to check if Titan is still there: it is. smile.gif
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