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Phoenix science results, Beginning with December 2008 AGU meeting
Paolo
post Sep 9 2010, 06:19 PM
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A few more results from Phoenix in tomorrow "Science":
Phoenix Lander Revealing a Younger, Livelier Mars
Stable Isotope Measurements of Martian Atmospheric CO2 at the Phoenix Landing Site


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I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

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Gsnorgathon
post Sep 10 2010, 01:16 AM
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And for those of us in the hoi polloi without Science subscriptions, the JPL press release.
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Phil Stooke
post Sep 13 2010, 05:05 PM
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Slightly off topic here, but I was looking through the Analyst's Notebook for Phoenix on PDS... I'm sure there used to be a section giving the names of rocks etc. with a reference image. I was trying to assemble a map of the site with all the named rocks etc. I'm not talking about the rocks right in the sample field, but out beyond that. Now I can't find that section. Does anyone know if there is any information out there that I'm missing?

Phil


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Phil Stooke
post Oct 13 2010, 08:31 PM
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OK folks, answering my own question here...

The names can be found in the Sol Summaries area of the Analyst's Notebook. Select any sol to get started, then in the Report window, choose 'Features and Targets'. You get a list of feature names which links to identifying pictures and other information. It just needs to be combined with a panorama to make a map with placenames. It's a future goal of mine, it won't be done soon. (but feel free to do it for me!)

Try, for instance, the rock Midgard and the polygon trough Land of Oz. They are clear enough, some others are not.

Phil


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Den
post Dec 18 2010, 11:32 PM
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QUOTE (Greg Watson @ Mar 19 2009, 11:50 PM) *
Salty Tears

So it was water on the landing legs................

Greg


Temperature range measured during Phoenix mission is -19.6 ... -97.7 C.

How these supposedly liquid droplets acquired so much salt to not freeze at such temperatures? Soil doesn't seem to have that much salt there, right? It's about 1% salt, not 100% salt. And even if it would be 100% salt, how salt was supposed to get on the leg, and stay there? Rocket exhaust tend to blast things away, not deposit dirt on things.

We have winter now in Northern hemisphere on Earth, and today I have about -10 C where I live. It is balmy by martian standards, yet I definitely see no liquid water anywhere outside - only ice and snow. Phoenix was colder that this, most of the time MUCH colder.

I saw such spherical droplets before. I even remember where: in the old fridge of my parents. It was before the era of self-defrosting fridges.

They were made of ice, and despite this, they were slowly changing their shapes over days/weeks.

My theory:

Landing of Phoenix exposed some ice. Also, it was the mid-summer. At this time of year, the near-surface dirt should be releasing water ice adsorbed during a long, dark, *COLD* polar night. So the air is relatively water vapor rich. This water, apparently, was condensing on the legs, and at times (-19.6 C) again sublimating - migrating.
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Phil Stooke
post Jan 20 2011, 06:18 PM
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Following up on my earlier posts, just above... I have collected as many names as I could from the Phoenix Analyst's Notebook, and plotted them on a reprojected panorama, in approximate map geometry. This is a working document, not a finished map, so it's a bit rough, but it's a start. Most of these names will be new to most people. Named features in the RAC work area are well known, but the more distant ones are not. Sadly, the Notebook materials are not very well presented - some features are not labelled, some are actually off the edge of the index image.

Phil

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PS - any Phoenix people around who would care to add details or correct errors?


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Phil Stooke
post Nov 29 2012, 10:36 PM
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Following up on an older post... this is the Phoenix landing site. A few additional placenames compared with the last post. The spacecraft is shown to scale - the camera locations caused the deck and arrays to hide a much larger area of the surface than the spacecraft itself. Features are controlled by warping the panorama to fit a high resolution DEM.

Phil

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Phil Stooke
post May 8 2013, 04:24 PM
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Another Phoenix product. A mission isn't over just because it's over. This is a mosaic showing all the RAC images I can find of the area under the lander. There are other images out in the trenching workspace which are not included.

My intention is to combine the SSI mosaic and this mosaic in a 'maximum coverage' mosaic of the lander vicinity. This RAC mosaic includes hideous distortions produced by trying to mosaic images taken close to the surface from many different viewpoints. I have combined numerous images to minimize the areas obscured by various struts and lander components, so little sections of a strut appear here and there where they could not be removed.

Phil

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jamescanvin
post May 9 2013, 07:49 AM
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Holy Cow!

Great work Phil.


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brellis
post May 9 2013, 08:38 AM
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The names are all so fun! What a great piece of work, Phil. Do you ever sleep? smile.gif
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Phil Stooke
post May 9 2013, 08:10 PM
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Sleep? But something might happen in the Solar System!

Phil



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Phil Stooke
post May 10 2013, 03:28 PM
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And... here's a map projected version of the RAC mosaic, plus the maximum coverage by SSI images, showing the positions of the ice features relative to the workspace at the top right. The SSI mosaic is made from frames taken before anything was touched.

Phil

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Tom Dahl
post May 11 2013, 02:19 AM
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That is a fabulous image, Phil! It provides wonderful context for the local terrain features.
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