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Data Discolsure, SRC of HSRC on MEX
djellison
post Jan 16 2005, 01:02 AM
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I've emailed David Southwood. I'm not happy with the second-hand info I've heard about the HSRC re it's SRC on MEX ( wow - acronym heaven)

This is what I wrote...

First of all – congratulations to all on the success of Huygens – some spectacular imagery and data to follow – something for all of Europe to be proud of. Who would have thought 20 years ago – that the first instrument to touch titan would come from Milton Keynes!



However – I email you to ask as to there status and whereabouts of High Resolution imagery from the HSRC on Mars Express. Almost a year of orbital operations – and yet not a single released image at the ~2m resolution capability of the HSRC – and not just that – but no explanation as to why there is no imagery! The rest of the cameras abilities have been published in some astonishing imagery that really does show Mars in a whole new way – it’s fantastic. But someone, I cant help feeling that us tax-paying Europeans are missing out on some information here – and doubly frustrating, missing out on WHY we’re missing out.



Whilst, obviously, NASA and JPL are much more experienced with such things – MOC aboard MGS has released of all imagery in 6 month batches, at 6 month intervals – and I cant help feel that Mars Express should be operating a similar routine – or at least explain what plans there are to do so.



Courtesy of a specialist reporter who attended a conference in the USA recently – I’ve heard suggestion that there are calibration problems with the SRC – and that scientific data from the HSRC will be released fairly shortly – but, to be brutally honest, third hand information that may or may not be accurate just isn’t good enough – and if ESA is to stand on the world stage proudly with data in hand saying “look – look at what we’ve done, what we’ve achieved, what we’re able to do – as well as anyone in the world” – then we need to have a level of disclosure much much greater than we have now – or the image of ESA as a whole will, to some extent, move away from that of an equal to NASA ( which is something it should be able to do )



I am hugely proud of Europe’s achievements in space - I see American success and, whereas not so long ago one would thing “wow – I wish we could do that” – now I can say “yes – we CAN do that” – a paradigm shift that has occurred perhaps only in the last 18 months or so – started with MEX, and exploded with Huygens – but there must be transparency and disclosure to keep this pattern on going.


If I get a response - then I'll let you all know. The address I used was david.southwood@esa.int - as that's what I found by googling for D.S.

Doug
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krrr
post Feb 7 2005, 06:31 PM
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According to this paper from April 2004, the SRC performance is somewhat disappointing. Only about twice the effective resolution of HRSC, for reasons unknown at that time.

ESA has published one SRC picture of Phobos.

Apparently, the first HRSC/SRC data set is now available.
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Guest_BruceMoomaw_*
post Mar 5 2005, 06:37 AM
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Guests






More on the subject from the upcoming European Geophysical Union conference ( http://www.cosis.net/abstracts/EGU05/06377/EGU05-J-06377.pdf ):

"Using a digital image matcher as a tool for position measurement of features in the images, we estimate that the magnification factor of SRC with respect to HRSC is 4.33, corresponding to an SRC effective focal length of 974.5 mm. This value is in good agreement with the nominal focal length, but 1.5% lower than the value that has been directly measured on the ground. However, the effective visibility of details in the SRC images is somewhat reduced over what one would expect: The
Mars Express mission constraints called for a low mass and low power instrument.
These requirements resulted in an instrument design relying on thermally balanced
conditions. In cases, where the thermal balance cannot be reached, imaging artifacts, such as blurring and 'ghosts' have been observed. Camera models and image processing algorithms are currently being studied and tested to remove these artifacts.

"By the time of writing (January, 2005) SRC has acquired more than 1500 frames, in which the camera has very often captured fascinating details in surface morphology. The SRC has proven to be very useful for statistics of small craters and for astrometric observations of Phobos. The poster will give an update on SRC performance results reported earlier and will show more examples of recently obtained data."

In short, as I figured, the SRC is out of focus for thermal reasons -- and apparently this did not come as a complete shock to the investigators. We will, I suppose, find out whether they can successfully deconvolve the blurred images.
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djellison
post Mar 5 2005, 11:53 AM
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We're still waiting to see ANY of those 1500 frames on the ESA Website apart from that one, I believe of Phobos. ESA has much to learn to be honest. I never got a response from Southwood sad.gif

Anyone know of the schedule for PDS releases of the Data?

Doug
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babakm
post Mar 22 2005, 10:02 PM
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QUOTE (djellison @ Mar 5 2005, 11:53 AM)
We're still waiting to see ANY of those 1500 frames on the ESA Website apart from that one, I believe of Phobos.  ESA has much to learn to be honest. I never got a response from Southwood sad.gif 

Anyone know of the schedule for PDS releases of the Data?

Doug
*


It's right on the page that you linked before. A slightly convoluted interface, but I managed to download a number of full (?) resolution images. The login is free to all.

http://www.rssd.esa.int/index.php?project=PSA
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Guest_spaceffm_*
post Mar 29 2005, 11:33 PM
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@djellison

Great inniative of You.
I am very sad about ESA's PR-Work, no proper Gallerys, not many publications and no Informations.

ESA was able to make out the great event of landing the huygens probe on titan a boring coffee hour.
It would have been very important to contact all media , to perform a great show and send datas and videos to alle TV stations around earth.
But none of it happened.

In Germany the event was broadcastet in the end of the news as " well here have some not so important news..."
Very bad.
I am dissapointed by ESA very much, on the other hand i am very happy that NASA is making such a good PR-Work.
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tedstryk
post Apr 12 2005, 06:39 PM
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QUOTE (BruceMoomaw @ Mar 5 2005, 06:37 AM)
More on the subject from the upcoming European Geophysical Union conference ( http://www.cosis.net/abstracts/EGU05/06377/EGU05-J-06377.pdf ):

"Using a digital image matcher as a tool for position measurement of features in the images, we estimate that the magnification factor of SRC with respect to HRSC is 4.33, corresponding to an SRC effective focal length of 974.5 mm. This value is in good agreement with the nominal focal length, but 1.5% lower than the value that has been directly measured on the ground. However, the effective visibility of details in the SRC images is somewhat reduced over what one would expect: The
Mars Express mission constraints called for a low mass and low power instrument.
These requirements resulted in an instrument design relying on thermally balanced
conditions. In cases, where the thermal balance cannot be reached, imaging artifacts, such as blurring and 'ghosts' have been observed. Camera models and image processing algorithms are currently being studied and tested to remove these artifacts.

"By the time of writing (January, 2005) SRC has acquired more than 1500 frames, in which the camera has very often captured fascinating details in surface morphology. The SRC has proven to be very useful for statistics of small craters and for astrometric observations of Phobos. The poster will give an update on SRC performance results reported earlier and will show more examples of recently obtained data."

In short, as I figured, the SRC is out of focus for thermal reasons -- and apparently this did not come as a complete shock to the investigators.  We will, I suppose, find out whether they can successfully deconvolve the blurred images.
*



This sounds like the Deep Impact HRI!


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jaywee
post Nov 18 2005, 05:02 PM
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Greetings,
just spotted 2nd release of HSRC data on PDS http://pds-geosciences.wustl.edu/geodata/m...-hrsc-3-rdr-v2/
It's the same data which was available on ESA Browser since July, but it's much easier to download.
Also, ESA recently added map-based interface for data retrieval on their archive http://www.rssd.esa.int/index.php?project=...age=MarsExpress

jv
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Phil Stooke
post Nov 18 2005, 08:50 PM
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... and to prove it, here's a recent image of Deimos from the SRC of HRSC. This is the Mars-facing end seen from a bit south of the equator.

Phil

Attached Image


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... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
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Phil Stooke
post Nov 18 2005, 09:00 PM
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And another... further north and west.

Phil

Attached Image


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... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
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Phil Stooke
post Nov 18 2005, 09:31 PM
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This is a Deimos 'super-resolution' composite (in the sense Ted and I, and others, have used the term... a composite of more than one images, each enlarged and sharpened) from the SRC images on MEX orbit 973. Each crater is accompanied by a 'shadow' above it - not a real shadow, but looking more like a double exposure. This was NOT caused by misregistration in my composite. It's visible in each raw image. It must be related to the issue which is reducing the effective resolution of the SRC images.

Phil

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... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
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Bob Shaw
post Nov 19 2005, 01:10 AM
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Phil:

Perhaps this explains the global paucity of data - all that had previously escaped was highly processed into faux 3-D and similar eye candy.

Oh, bottoms!

Bob Shaw


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Remember: Time Flies like the wind - but Fruit Flies like bananas!
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Phil Stooke
post Nov 19 2005, 04:35 AM
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Everything's bottoms, isn't it, Bob!

Phil


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... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
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Phil Stooke
post Dec 13 2005, 11:29 PM
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Hre's a recent Mars Express image from the recent data release.

It's Phobos seen by the SRC. Lots of grooves.

I'm getting the hang of the system now. I go into ESA's PSA, search on (in this case) Phobos - or could do a lat-long search on Mars for images of a specific feature. That gives me a list of images. Then I go to PDS, look for the image in their browse directories to confirm it, then to the data directories to find the full image, and download it.

You could search for the header elsewhere but an easy approach is to open the file in Word or a similar word processor. It lets you read the header. Then open the image as raw in Photoshop or equivalent. They are 16 bit.

Phil


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elakdawalla
post Dec 13 2005, 11:32 PM
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QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Dec 13 2005, 03:29 PM)
Hre's a recent Mars Express image from the recent data release.

It's Phobos seen by the SRC.  Lots of grooves.

Attached Image

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Wow, that's a cool picture. Phil (or anybody else with as crazy an amount of knowledge as Phil), have we seen Phobos at this longitude in any previous image from any spacecraft? I don't remember a view anything like this. Is there another adjacent tile in there that one could make a mosaic from?

Also, to anyone's knowledge, has any picture from the SRC ever been released to the public/press?

And, for this picture in specific: would it be a valuable activity to try any of those focus-correcting or deconvolution tools on these blurry SRC images?

--Emily


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