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Apollo Sites from LRO
Phil Stooke
post Nov 13 2009, 03:27 PM
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I agree with this - I was thinking of the rock at first but it's not in quite the right location. The cover looks right. Good observation.

Phil


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BUDU
post Nov 14 2009, 03:13 PM
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Am I seeing the flag?
http://img5.imageshack.us/img5/7440/a11loworbitbflag.jpg
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Paolo
post Nov 14 2009, 04:18 PM
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The LRRR cover is visible in an amazing number of pictures, but I think AS-11-37-5551 is the best (well almost...)
It is visible just to the right of the vertical thruster


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Maquis
post Nov 16 2009, 09:06 PM
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QUOTE (Paolo @ Nov 14 2009, 05:18 PM) *
It is visible just to the right of the vertical thruster


Yeah, it's visible in here too. Somehow I didn't notice that image earlier - would certainly be helpful.

As for the flag - wasn't it a bit smaller?
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Stu
post Jan 30 2010, 08:56 AM
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New image of Apollo 14 landing site up on LRO site...

http://wms.lroc.asu.edu/lroc_browse

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ilbasso
post Apr 15 2010, 03:52 AM
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Nathaniel Burton-Bradford has posted these anaglyphs of the Apollo landing sites using LRO images.


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monty python
post Apr 15 2010, 06:54 AM
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WOW! The 3d treatment really brings out the detail, and the man made stuff sticks up at ya. Great stuff.
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nprev
post Apr 15 2010, 09:46 AM
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Cool they are indeed. Is the vertical scale exaggerated, though? The craters near A14 & 15 look deep.


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djellison
post Apr 15 2010, 10:57 AM
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Making anaglyphs from stereo pairs - it's almost impossible to claim vertical accuracy in terms of exaggeration. We've had this discussion before with HiRISE or maybe CTX images. We're looking at a geometry when your eyeballs would be several km apart, 50 km above the lunar surface, and you can't back out of that to a more 'human' perspective without generating a DEM, and then re-rendering that as an Anaglyph.
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nprev
post Apr 15 2010, 11:24 AM
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Ah. Makes sense--thanks, Doug.

I was actually wondering for a minute there if my own sense of perspective and/or memory was misleading from the Apollo ground photography!


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kenny
post Apr 15 2010, 01:16 PM
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QUOTE (ilbasso @ Apr 15 2010, 04:52 AM) *
Nathaniel Burton-Bradford has posted these anaglyphs of the Apollo landing sites using LRO images.

They're great. Note that the Apollo 14 and 15 ones are inverted mirror-images, whereas the Apollo 11 site is correct.
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john_s
post Apr 15 2010, 01:42 PM
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QUOTE (djellison @ Apr 15 2010, 10:57 AM) *
Making anaglyphs from stereo pairs - it's almost impossible to claim vertical accuracy in terms of exaggeration.


I do think vertical exaggeration is a meaningful concept for stereo anaglyphs, but it's not a fixed quantity. You'll see the "true" vertical relief when the convergence angle of your eyeballs matches the convergence angle of the two original images. So exaggeration depends on not only the original convergence angle, but on how close your eyeballs are to the screen- relief is more exaggerated the further away from the screen you are. Try it!

John
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nprev
post Apr 15 2010, 03:28 PM
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Huh. Yeah, I just did; never noticed that before. Thanks, John.

Here's a layman's question: Can you produce "true" stereo images by applying a scaled offset correction proportional to the distance between the two cameras so that the main varible becomes the distance between the observer's eyes?


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Bill Harris
post Apr 16 2010, 08:01 PM
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I see that the location of the Apollo 15 LRR (Lunar Ranging Retroreflector) has been identified

http://wms.lroc.asu.edu/lroc_browse/view/M111578606LE

I wonder if the geometry would ever allow sunlight to be retroreflected back to LRO? That would certainly make an evocative image.

--Bill


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djellison
post Apr 16 2010, 08:06 PM
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If the sun were directly 'behind' the spacecraft, it could happen - can that happen, however, with that landing site?
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