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India's Mars probe (MOM), Development, launch, and cruise to Mars
Paolo
post Aug 31 2009, 08:10 PM
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according to the Chinese Xinhua press agency an Indian Mars probe may be launched in 2013 or 2015, after Chandrayaan-2
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2009-08/...nt_11972334.htm


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Paolo
post Jan 9 2012, 10:18 AM
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finally, some info on the proposed Indian Mars mission
http://www.asianscientist.com/topnews/isro...ed-planet-2013/
2013 is probably too early, 2016 or 2018 may be more realistic.
and Chandrayaan was not that successful, after all...


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tolis
post Aug 11 2012, 09:38 PM
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While no-one was watching (or had their eyes on Curiosity)
the Indian government approved a national mission to Mars:

http://physicsworld.com/cws/article/news/2...mission-in-2013

Vital statistics:

Launch on PSLV-XL in Nov 2013
500kg, 25kg payload to "..study the planet's geology and climate.."
Highly elliptical orbit around Mars

Good stuff.

Tolis.
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antipode
post Aug 11 2012, 11:50 PM
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Hmmm, any way to get an Electra comms package onboard?

ph34r.gif

P
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tolis
post Sep 9 2012, 04:50 PM
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Some new info regarding the Indian Mars Probe


From the following article

http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.co...methane-mystery

one can infer that one of the science objectives is to look for methane and its sources.


From this

http://www.deccanchronicle.com/channels/sc...genous-isro-217


we learn that no foreign involvement (instruments etc) is foreseen. There is also a reference to the probe as "Mangalyaan"
which makes sense I guess ("Mangala" is one of the words for "Mars" in Sanskrit?).

Tolis.
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Doc
post Sep 9 2012, 05:06 PM
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From that last article, they hint at the possibility of still having a 2013 launch though there may not be one until 2016.

I'm surprised ISRO has already declared it to be an 'indigneous' mission. They could have solicited a foreign surface package for a light-weight lander to maximise science return.


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Paolo
post Sep 10 2012, 07:01 AM
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QUOTE (Doc @ Sep 9 2012, 07:06 PM) *
I'm surprised ISRO has already declared it to be an 'indigneous' mission.


apparently, there are strong political motivations behind the mission. I will not violate forum rules, go have a look to the thread on the nasaspaceflight forum


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Paolo
post Sep 18 2012, 06:59 AM
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this is interesting http://www.firstpost.com/tech/indias-mars-...013-459232.html

QUOTE
“As in the case of Chandrayaan-1, we will have to take the spacecraft first into the earth’s orbit from 22,000 km to 200,000 km in stages using the propulsion system and fire the rocket’s liquid apogee motor to push it into the Martian orbit after cruising about 300 days”


this looks like the mission profile of the Soviet Fobos missions, of Mars 96 and Fobos-Grunt


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tolis
post Sep 18 2012, 03:24 PM
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QUOTE (Paolo @ Sep 18 2012, 07:59 AM) *
this is interesting http://www.firstpost.com/tech/indias-mars-...013-459232.html



this looks like the mission profile of the Soviet Fobos missions, of Mars 96 and Fobos-Grunt



..as well as Chang'e 1.

When your propulsion system is not very powerful or very accurate,
it is preferable to split large burns into segments (when possible).
This prevents large "gravity losses" (for long burns) and gives
the mission time to measure and correct any under/over burns.

In a nutshell: it saves fuel, when there is not much to spare.

Tolis.


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rlorenz
post Sep 19 2012, 08:58 PM
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QUOTE (tolis @ Sep 18 2012, 11:24 AM) *
When your propulsion system is not very powerful or very accurate,
it is preferable to split large burns into segments (when possible).
This prevents large "gravity losses" (for long burns) and gives
the mission time to measure and correct any under/over burns.

I suppose it also makes you more resilient to any pressurization issues, as
in when your nominally regulated system starts operating in blowdown mode,
as Akatsuki did (in effect)
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tolis
post Sep 26 2012, 02:40 PM
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Indians are cutting (and joining) metal for their orbiter:


http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/...orbiter-376942/
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tolis
post Sep 30 2012, 08:08 PM
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A nice summing up of the current state of india's Mars orbiter project by Emily Lakdawalla:

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakda...aan-update.html


For what it's worth, I think that, although the mission development timeframe does seem awfully short, there are also
some reasons to be optimistic:

1. There are indications, eg the delivery of the spacecraft structure, that work on the project began long before the formal
announcement of the mission.


2. Such a fast schedule is not unheard of. The Mariner 9 mission, the US's first Mars orbiter,
was launched in May 1971, 2.5 yr after the formal project start in November 1968. One could argue
that, with a Moon orbiter under its belt, India is in a similar stage in its planetary programme.


3. The technical complexity of the mission, although formidable in absolute terms (it is, after all, a mission to Mars) is
actually quite modest as planetary missions go. The goal is to attain a highly elliptical orbit around Mars and conduct
observations of the planet from this orbit. The one critical maneuvre of the mission (assuming that is is dispatched
from Earth without problems) is a well-timed engine burn near closest approach to the planet on the first pass.
There is no probe to land, no major orbit changes, rendezvous with either one of the moons or sample return.
This is no Phobos-Grunt, more like a Mars Express sans Beagle 2.

So, I would say that there is better than a 50-50 chance of it getting to where it wants to go. Of course, in the real world
it is impossible to fly, say, 10,000 identical missions to see what the actual probability of success is (that's why we have
bayesian statistics, by the way laugh.gif ) but I remain cautiously optimistic about this one.

Tolis.
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mcaplinger
post Sep 30 2012, 09:43 PM
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QUOTE (tolis @ Sep 30 2012, 01:08 PM) *
2. Such a fast schedule is not unheard of. The Mariner 9 mission, the US's first Mars orbiter,
was launched in May 1971, 2.5 yr after the formal project start in November 1968.

There's rather a large difference between 2.5 years and 1.3 years, though it's not clear when Mangalyaan actually started. Also, Mariner Mars 1971 was a direct follow-on to the Mariner 6-7 flyby missions with a lot of heritage, see http://history.nasa.gov/SP-4212/ch6.html

I wish them the best, but it's just not a lot of time.


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Paolo
post Oct 1 2012, 05:10 AM
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QUOTE (mcaplinger @ Sep 30 2012, 11:43 PM) *
Also, Mariner Mars 1971 was a direct follow-on to the Mariner 6-7 flyby missions with a lot of heritage,


I suspect that Mangalyaan also has a lot of heritage from Chandrayaan. In the structure at least (hopefully not in the thermal control system as well)


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elakdawalla
post Oct 1 2012, 05:43 AM
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To be fair, the Moon's is a much more challenging thermal environment than Mars'. I think.


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