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Unmanned landing sites from LRO, Surveyors, Lunas, Lunakhods and impact craters from hardware impacts
Guest_Zvezdichko_*
post Oct 1 2009, 08:46 AM
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QUOTE (JRA @ Oct 1 2009, 09:37 AM) *
It looks as though the Surveyor 1 site has been imaged. The image was taken when the LRO was still in the commissioning orbit.

http://lroc.sese.asu.edu/news/?archives/11...ar-landing.html


Old smile.gif

http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.p...st&p=147019

Anyway, good contribution
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JRA
post Oct 1 2009, 10:43 AM
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QUOTE (Zvezdichko @ Oct 1 2009, 12:46 AM) *



Oops, didn't realize it was posted already. My bad smile.gif
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Stu
post Oct 1 2009, 11:15 AM
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Not a "bad" at all, don't worry about it JRA, it happens all the time smile.gif When I joined here I lost count of the number of times I alerted the board to something already mentioned by someone else.

I prefer to think of it as "being keen to share", not "old". smile.gif


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charborob
post Oct 1 2009, 01:58 PM
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I noticed some funny-looking craters on LRO's image of the Surveyor 1 landing site. Below is a sampling.
These three craters are all at the same scale. They seem recent and are around 100 m wide or less. It looks like the unconsolidated regolith was pushed back by the blast produced by the impact, revealing the surface of the bedrock. If this interpretation is correct., these craters would make great sampling spots. No need to dig through the regolith to get to the bedrock, the work has already been done by meteorites.
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Holder of the Tw...
post Oct 1 2009, 03:04 PM
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Surveyor 1 happened to land in one of the geologically youngest spots on the moon. The regolith there is exceptionally thin, which means you will get a lot of young looking craters, and they will plow into thin soil.
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Phil Stooke
post Oct 1 2009, 03:15 PM
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This type of crater was discovered in Lunar Orbiter images and recognized as a probe of the depth to bedrock. They can be used to map variations in regolith thickness. Apollo 12's backup landing site - a pinpoint landing spot in Apollo Site 5, was near a crater of this type.

Phil


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charborob
post Oct 1 2009, 03:26 PM
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Well, so I didn't discover anything new, but anyway, these craters are cool, especially at such high definition.
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stewjack
post Oct 1 2009, 09:17 PM
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QUOTE (charborob @ Oct 1 2009, 10:26 AM) *
Well, so I didn't discover anything new,

But I learned something new. smile.gif

Jack
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PDP8E
post Oct 2 2009, 02:48 AM
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Here is the Surveyor 1 site

I downloaded the TIFF (!pain!) and then adjusted the dynamic levels, cropped, destriped, and a little blow up (whew!)

(Dear LROC Team, please put non-annotated images up for us noodles to noodle with....like the Apollo sites!)

Attached Image


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BUDU
post Nov 22 2009, 04:55 PM
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LRO is now orbiting over Mare Crisium and the Sun is low over there.I hope it's imaging Luna 23 and 24 landing sites.
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Phil Stooke
post Mar 1 2010, 01:26 AM
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LROC news from LPSC - heard from a thoroughly disreputable source (I'm only kidding, L!) - LROC has seen Luna 24 and Lunokhod 2. Results should be shown in a talk tomorrow. Maybe there will be a release soon after. Luna 24 apparently landed on a crater rim, which may have affected its sampling ability.

Phil


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Geert
post Mar 1 2010, 01:38 AM
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QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Mar 1 2010, 08:26 AM) *
Luna 24 apparently landed on a crater rim, which may have affected its sampling ability.


That's great news Phil!
Have been looking forward to those images for some time.

Are they sure it's Luna 24 and not Luna 23 (which landed nearby), 23 was the one which damaged its drilling equipment on touchdown.
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Phil Stooke
post Mar 1 2010, 01:45 AM
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I can't tell you yet. Maybe more tomorrow.

Phil


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Phil Stooke
post Mar 1 2010, 07:44 PM
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Update. Mark Robinson showed images of three Luna landers, 20, 23 and 24. Luna 20 shows the shadow of its sample delivery arm "as if it's waving at us" according to Mark. Luna 23 is sitting on the very edge of a crater only 2 or 3 m across. No obvious sign of why it couldn't collect a sample. Luna 24 is on the rim of a c. 20 or 30 m fresh crater, which may explain an odd thing about its sample... not the amount, but the fact that it differed from the surrounding area as measured by remote sensing... it seems to consist of freshly exposed subsurface material rather than the space-weathered material all around it.

Beautiful pics - let's hope they are released very soon.

Phil


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Paolo
post Mar 2 2010, 06:40 AM
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No release yet of the Luna images (too bad, where are they?!?)
in their place, this image of the Marius Hills Hole has been published on the LROC image browser http://wms.lroc.asu.edu/lroc_browse/view/M114328462R


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