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Unmanned landing sites from LRO, Surveyors, Lunas, Lunakhods and impact craters from hardware impacts
nprev
post Mar 19 2010, 05:16 PM
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It's amazing to watch how this story unfolds in the mass media. Phil, you're a long way from Hollywood, so just to save you the trip this weekend I'll drive up there, assume your identity & have you on tabloid covers & TMZ by Sunday morning. You're welcome. smile.gif

On a completely different note, have any of the booster impact and/or Ranger sites been imaged at high resolution yet? Assume that the S-IVB hits might be the easiest of these to spot.

EDIT: And right after posting, I see you've found the Apollo 14 LM impact already! You're a machine, Phil; go, man, go!!!


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S_Walker
post Mar 19 2010, 06:10 PM
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I've been searching for Ranger 9 impact scar, but my blasted internet connection at work keeps timing out...
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Phil Stooke
post Mar 19 2010, 07:21 PM
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Ranger 9 looks to be outside the coverage we have so far - looks like the best images are just to the east of it. I posted Apollo 14's LM ascent stage (or shall we say a candidate for it) in the other thread.

Phil


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Byran
post Mar 20 2010, 02:49 PM
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Luna-21 found
http://lroc.sese.asu.edu/news/?archives/20...-21-Lander.html


Who did not try to find a Luna-16?

-0.68 56.3
http://wms.lroc.asu.edu/lroc/view_lroc/LRO....0/M106511834LE


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kenny
post Mar 21 2010, 08:18 PM
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No-one appears to have turned up Luna 16 to date, so Im wondering if there is something about this one (such as poorer LROC imagery) which is inhibiting the search? I see bright objects in the correct area, some with apparent shadows going the correct way, but none anything like as sharp as the Luna 17, 20, 23 etc images.
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Geert
post Mar 22 2010, 02:09 AM
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LROC side has images of Surveyor 6 and Surveyor 5.

Luna 16 and Luna 18 still appear to be missing although they should be somewhere in the imagery.

Am I correct that the Luna 9-13 area has not yet been imaged/released by LRO?
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Byran
post Mar 22 2010, 05:24 PM
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QUOTE (Geert @ Mar 22 2010, 07:39 AM) *
Am I correct that the Luna 9-13 area has not yet been imaged/released by LRO?


No. It remains to find the 4 stations made a soft landing on the moon - Luna-9, 13, 16, Surveyor-7.


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Hungry4info
post Mar 22 2010, 06:40 PM
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What about Ranger impacts? Or the Surveyor 2 crash site? Any plans to look for these?


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Phil Stooke
post Mar 22 2010, 07:15 PM
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Everything will be looked for! The list of targets - thousands of them including all anthropogenic sites - has been public for months. It's just a matter of actually getting the right images. and finding the objects.

Phil


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S_Walker
post Mar 22 2010, 07:56 PM
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QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Mar 22 2010, 03:15 PM) *
Everything will be looked for! The list of targets - thousands of them including all anthropogenic sites - has been public for months. It's just a matter of actually getting the right images. and finding the objects.

Phil


Mostly the right lighting conditions. You can't find anything in the images with direct overhead solar lighting...
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Byran
post Mar 23 2010, 10:05 AM
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QUOTE
Caption: Bang! On April 14th 1970, the Apollo 13 Saturn IVB upper stage impacted the Moon North of Mare Cognitum, at -2.55 latitude, -27.88 East longitude. The impact crater, which is roughly 30 meters in diameter, is clearly visible in LROC NAC image M109420042LE [NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University]


http://lroc.sese.asu.edu/news/?archives/20...ic-network.html


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ElkGroveDan
post Mar 23 2010, 01:54 PM
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That has got to be the best man-made impact site we've seen yet.


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Explorer1
post Mar 23 2010, 11:28 PM
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Now that's what I'm talking about! Good old fashioned explosions!
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Geert
post Mar 25 2010, 12:55 PM
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Attached Image


Most probably it's just one of the many rocks in the area, but size and shadow at least seem to comply with the other Luna sample return missions, so this might be a candidate for Luna 18? Object is somewhat to the northeast of the Luna 20 lander on LRO image M119482862R.

Lots and lots of (big) rocks all over the area, but most of them are either too big, too small, or too rounded to be a lander, assuming at least that Luna 18 more or less landed intact (contact seems to have been lost at a altitude of less then 100 mtr).
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kenny
post Mar 25 2010, 01:31 PM
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Looks more like a boulder to me, with its uniform relfectivity and boulder-shaped shadow, rather than a multi-faceted tall, thin metallic object. But as always, it's easy to be wrong in this game...
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