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Water on the Moon, Data from multiple missions seems to indicate...
Juramike
post Sep 24 2009, 12:23 AM
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This probably deserves it's own thread. Seems the evidence is not specific to only one mission...

space.com article: http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/0909...-discovery.html


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belleraphon1
post Sep 24 2009, 01:10 AM
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From the AP

"Three different space probes found the chemical signature of water all over the moon's surface, surprising the scientists who at first doubted the unexpected measurement until it was confirmed independently and repeatedly."

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/articl...mQs6OgD9AT9B4O1

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ElkGroveDan
post Sep 24 2009, 02:56 AM
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I'd say the timing is now ripe for another announced discovery of water on Mars. rolleyes.gif


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elakdawalla
post Sep 24 2009, 03:55 AM
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There are two more papers, one by Sunshine et al from Deep Impact, and very short one by Roger Clark from Cassini. All find the same 3-micron feature indicating the presence of H20 or OH, but not surprisingly all have slightly different takes on the significance (though I should note Clark is the 3rd author on the Pieters paper).

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Astro0
post Sep 24 2009, 04:03 AM
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Dan, We've had the "water on Mars" line so many times now, I think it deserves its own icon. smile.gif Attached Image

EDIT: Please note that I decided to pull the link to the Water on the Moon story.
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centsworth_II
post Sep 24 2009, 04:18 AM
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QUOTE (ElkGroveDan @ Sep 23 2009, 09:56 PM) *
I'd say the timing is now ripe for another announced discovery of water on Mars.
I would compare water discoveries on Mars to oil discoveries on Earth. We know there is water on Mars, but that doesn't mean that new discoveries, whether in location or extent, are not big news.
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nprev
post Sep 24 2009, 04:22 AM
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laugh.gif ...killer, Astro0!

Suspect that this will all prove to be of minerological rather than practical interest after the dust settles; it really ain't a lot of water. The possiblity of endogenous origin via solar wind interaction with the soil is fascinating, though.


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ElkGroveDan
post Sep 24 2009, 05:09 AM
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QUOTE (centsworth_II @ Sep 23 2009, 09:18 PM) *
I would compare water discoveries on Mars to oil discoveries on Earth. We know there is water on Mars, but that doesn't mean that new discoveries, whether in location or extent, are not big news.


Yes, but the oil companies don't send out press releases with every discovery that breathlessly announce: "The long suspected existence of oil on Earth has finally been confirmed."


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centsworth_II
post Sep 24 2009, 05:20 AM
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QUOTE (ElkGroveDan @ Sep 24 2009, 01:09 AM) *
...press releases with every discovery...

I think a mistake commonly made here is to concentrate on sensational headlines that are not part of the press release rather than the release itself which usually puts the story in perspective.
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Doc
post Sep 24 2009, 12:02 PM
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According to SpaceRef.com, NASA hadn't yet released Cassini data from the flyby of 1999 until now it seems. Has anyone noticed this?
This reminds me of the Phoenix conundrum of last year.


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djellison
post Sep 24 2009, 12:35 PM
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I can only find ISS data from Cassini for the earth flyby - nothing from any other instrument (using http://starbrite.jpl.nasa.gov/ ) so working on the assumption that this is VIMS or CIRS data -then yup - it's not been in the PDS.

I'm finding it hard to get excited about this. We're talking about something two to three times, possibly 30 times drier, than dry concrete - and even then - if I'm not misreading stuff, just in the top few mm of the regolith is this 'damp' (BBC's choice of word there)

So you might get a few tens of tons of water out of ploughing through an entire square km of surface. I'm struggling to imagine that as being useful for, err, anything.

It may well be that this surface smattering of H+O is all there is to the water on the moon story (given the none too positive results from radar mapping of the moons poles) - so I'm going to stick my neck out and predict a very dry LCROSS event.
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remcook
post Sep 24 2009, 01:12 PM
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It must be VIMS data.
I could be very wrong, but from the few articles on this I've seen this means that the dark craters get more water input than thought, so there could be a lot more there (??). The press conference will address some of these things I'm sure. I find it hard to judge what they exactly saw where.
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elakdawalla
post Sep 24 2009, 01:41 PM
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It is VIMS data, and it is in the PDS. One problem is that the Clark paper seems to have given the wrong date for the data he shows -- he said August 19, it was August 18. Do a search here: http://pds-imaging.jpl.nasa.gov/search/search.html for VIMS data on August 18, 1999 and toward the bottom of the results page you'll see the lunar stuff. An example browse image is attached. It's fairly low resolution. I'm looking for anyone who can turn this stuff into a pretty natural color view.
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Phil Stooke
post Sep 24 2009, 01:53 PM
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I'm giving up on predicting anything - well, except the stock market.

Phil


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Doc
post Sep 24 2009, 02:30 PM
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Might be safe to say that this discovery could be used to explain the wierd distribution of the hydrogen detected by LRO.


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