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kuiper belt map?, does it exist?
elakdawalla
post Dec 17 2009, 03:22 PM
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WISE can't detect objects as cold as any of the known Kuiper belt objects. It couldn't detect another Earth if such existed within the Kuiper belt, as an Earth would only be 35 K out there. Read starting from "Moving on to the brown dwarf detections..." in my blog entry on the mission.


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alan
post Dec 17 2009, 03:58 PM
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The papers I've seen discussing Spitzer Space Telescope observations have calculated temperatures for kuiper belt objects of above 50K, still too cold for WISE. WISE may be able to detect some centaurs out to about 15 AU, Chiron for example, was 98K at 13 AU.
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maschnitz
post Dec 18 2009, 12:37 AM
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cassioli, did you read Brown's whole article around that? He makes some great points about how that style depiction of the solar system isn't helpful.

And he provides his own depiction, to boot.
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Guest_cassioli_*
post Dec 18 2009, 08:45 AM
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yes, indeed I was asking for a solar system poster based on his layout. But being not able to find it, I'm going to create it by myself. smile.gif
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Guest_cassioli_*
post Dec 19 2009, 11:02 PM
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This is my "work in progress" solar system:
http://img190.imageshack.us/img190/2881/sistemasolare.jpg

Any suggestion?
I'd like to add some boxes with details about minor bodies. Maybe I could add major moons of each planet.

Text will be clearly visibile in hi-res version (even smallest one).
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helvick
post Dec 20 2009, 02:18 AM
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I like the approach - it is very effective at conveying a sense of the relative scale of the various important bodies in the system.

I'd make a couple of suggestions:
Use a solar image of just a fraction of the solar limb as a backdrop, but keep it to the same scale so it is almost a vertical slice to convey just how huge the sun is and keep a solar prominence in the frame, that works very nicely IMO. I'd also prefer to see a presentation that kept the body sequence intact in terms of overlay position - I think the presentation would be better with Uranus, Neptune, Pluto, Eris, Haumea, Makemake clearly positioned "behind" Saturn and the order of the inner planets showing Mercury\Venus\Earth\Mars in that sequence from foreground to background.

Also I'd broaden the spatial part of the chart that shows the absolute range from Sol out to the Kuiper belt bodies so that it covers the entire width of the image - the basic idea is excellent though as it fills in the missing impression of distance that the to-scale primary images cannot convey.

They are just opinions though - I really do like this approach, excellent work.

One final thing - if you can apply some anti-aliasing to the images it would make the full resolution version look _much_ better.
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maschnitz
post Dec 20 2009, 02:42 AM
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Something to think about is whether you're presenting an image of each planet that's close to what a human might see. For example, Venus looks like more of a cream-colored cue ball in the visible spectrum. You've got a simulated view of what Venus might look like without an atmosphere.

Similarly, Neptune's a bit more dusky-gray. And no one has any idea what the surfaces of Pluto, Eris, Haumea, etc look like, really. All we really have are colored dots (except for Pluto, which has a tiny map, and Haumea, which we know the shape of, roughly). Those are artists' impressions.

I think there is a whole thread about this on UMSF.
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Guest_cassioli_*
post Dec 21 2009, 07:43 PM
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QUOTE (helvick @ Dec 20 2009, 02:18 AM) *
One final thing - if you can apply some anti-aliasing to the images it would make the full resolution version look _much_ better.

I cam't understand why my graphic program keep cuting circles in such an imprecise way: the size of each of those "pixels" is actually some dozens of pixels!!! huh.gif
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Guest_cassioli_*
post Dec 21 2009, 09:14 PM
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can anybody please suggest a goog&free graphic program to help me completing this poster?
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helvick
post Dec 21 2009, 09:33 PM
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A really (really!) good place to start would be to head over to the Planetary Society and Emily's excellent space imagery tutorials..
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