IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

 
Reply to this topicStart new topic
LCROSS results, News as and when we find it
elakdawalla
post Jan 14 2010, 12:02 AM
Post #1


Bloggette par Excellence
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 4503
Joined: 4-August 05
From: Pasadena, CA, USA, Earth
Member No.: 454



There hasn't been much activity on the "LCROSS Impact" thread since a few weeks after the Oct 8 impact, so it seemed like a good place to break and start a new thread for results.

I don't know what results will be discussed this evening, but there is -- in about one hour from the time I post this -- going to be a live webcast and Q and A with PI Tony Colaprete. Via @MyMoonLPI on Twitter: "Chat with LCROSS principal investigator Tony Colaprete TONIGHT @ 8 pm Eastern, http://bit.ly/4Gfhbj "


--------------------
My blog - @elakdawalla on Twitter - Please support unmannedspaceflight.com by donating here.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
marsophile
post Jan 16 2010, 12:19 AM
Post #2


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 313
Joined: 10-September 08
Member No.: 4338



A few points covered in the webcast, if I remember correctly: ratio of water to dust directly measured in plume, about 4%; surprisingly, a lot of molecular hydrogen (H2), and other volatiles. Also mercury, light hydrocarbons including methane, CO2, and ammonia. Similarities to comet or asteroidal material. Much of impact energy absorbed in vaporizing the volatiles.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
nprev
post Jan 16 2010, 12:45 AM
Post #3


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 7141
Joined: 8-December 05
From: Los Angeles
Member No.: 602



The Hg detection continues to surprise me. However, if you consider it as a volatile, then it actually provides supporting evidence for the cold-trap mechanism.

In fact...WAG here, but since it's such a heavy element & much of the impact energy apparently was expended in vaporizing volatiles, does its presence explain the understated flash?


--------------------
A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Byran
post Feb 11 2010, 07:42 PM
Post #4


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 68
Joined: 10-September 05
Member No.: 493



ftp://ftp.lpi.usra.edu/pub/outgoing/lpsc2010/full204.pdf
QUOTE
However the SPH calculation shows that the H2O mass ejected over the 2.5 km height is ~150 kg [4], when assuming the water content in the excavated lunar soil is 1 wt %. The difference between our observation resuts and pre-mission SPH calculation results [4] would suggest three possible interpretations. The first interpretaion is the lack of water in the shallow regions in the PSA. However because the upper limit of the ejecta (~1000 kg) and H2O mass (~40 kg) obtained by Subaru leads to ~4 wt % of water content, four times the estimate for average abundance (~1 wt %) from LP observation [2] Thus this interpretation of dry upper layer is not necessarily supported by our observation. The second interpretation is that ice grains excavated by the Centaur impact had a very large average size, slowing the rate of sublimation greatly. However this interpretation is inconsistent with the observation of the significant amount of water vapor observed by the SS/C, which can see the ejecta as low as about 1 km above the floor of Cabeus crater. The third interpretation is that the amount of high-speed ejecta reaching the height of the slit of the Subaru telescope was much smaller than the theoretical estimates. The IRCS imaging observation results [7] also supports this interpretations. There are two possible mechanisms for this interpretation. (1) The cut-off velocity exists between the ejection velocity reaching the height observable by the S-S/C and the ejection velocity reaching the height observable by the Subaru telescope. (2) The ejection angle of the Centaur impact was much smaller than that of standard impact cases (~45).


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Vultur
post Apr 2 2010, 08:45 AM
Post #5


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 199
Joined: 9-September 08
Member No.: 4334



There's a news article here about water results from LCROSS and Chandrayaan-1.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
MahFL
post Apr 2 2010, 10:26 AM
Post #6


Forum Contributor
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1029
Joined: 8-February 04
From: North East Florida, USA.
Member No.: 11



Mines a glass of the pure water...thankyou. ohmy.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Jun 10 2010, 09:19 PM
Post #7


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5808
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



The raw data from LCROSS are now available at PDS.

Phil


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
JohnVV
post Jun 11 2010, 12:25 AM
Post #8


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 535
Joined: 18-November 08
Member No.: 4489



cool but the lola has not been updated
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
djellison
post Jun 11 2010, 12:57 AM
Post #9


Administrator
****

Group: Chairman
Posts: 13851
Joined: 8-February 04
Member No.: 1



LOLA is nothing to do with LCROSS.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
elakdawalla
post Oct 18 2010, 07:01 PM
Post #10


Bloggette par Excellence
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 4503
Joined: 4-August 05
From: Pasadena, CA, USA, Earth
Member No.: 454



QUOTE
MEDIA ADVISORY: M10-144

NASA HOSTS MEDIA TELECON FEATURING RESULTS OF MOON MISSION IMPACT THE SCIENCE JOURNAL HAS EMBARGOED INFORMATION UNTIL 2 P.M. EDT ON OCT. 21

WASHINGTON -- NASA will host a media teleconference at 2 p.m. EDT on Thursday, Oct. 21, to discuss additional findings from NASA's Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite, or LCROSS, and NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, missions.
The results will be featured in six papers published in the Oct. 22 issue of the journal Science. The journal's embargo on these results will be lifted at the start of the telecon.

The briefing will focus on the data from:

The Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment which measures surface and subsurface temperatures from orbit.

The Lyman Alpha Mapping Project which is mapping the entire lunar surface in the far ultraviolet spectrum.

The Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector which creates high-resolution maps of hydrogen distribution and gathers information about the neutron component of the lunar radiation environment.

The panelists are:
-- Michael Wargo, chief lunar scientist, Exploration Systems Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters, Washington
-- Anthony Colaprete, LCROSS project scientist and principal investigator, NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif.
-- David Paige, Diviner instrument principal investigator, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)
-- Igor Mitrofanov, Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector principal investigator, Institute for Space Research, Moscow
-- Peter Schultz, professor of geological sciences, Brown University, Providence, R.I. and LCROSS science team member
-- Paul Hayne, graduate student at UCLA and Diviner team member
-- Randy Gladstone, Lyman-Alpha Mapping Project deputy principal investigator, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio
-- Richard Vondrak, LRO project scientist, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

To view supporting information available at the start of the teleconference, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/lcross

Audio of the teleconference will be streamed live at: http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio


I will be calling in to the teleconference and write about it for the blog. Since the LCROSS data set is available, I've written on my to-do list an item to take a look at the data and see if there are any fun images to pull out. However, it's going to be a busy week for me. If anyone reading this has thought "I ought to see what I can get out of the LCROSS data set and post it on UMSF," this would be a good week to do it smile.gif


--------------------
My blog - @elakdawalla on Twitter - Please support unmannedspaceflight.com by donating here.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
stewjack
post Oct 21 2010, 05:58 PM
Post #11


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 252
Joined: 5-May 05
From: Mississippi (USA)
Member No.: 379



NASA News Audio Live Streaming starts in a few minutes! 2:00 PM EST 18:00 UTC

LCROSS-LRO: Results of the Moon Mission Impact

LISTEN LIVE NOW: Real | Windows
This link may not be active until 10-15 minutes before the start of the teleconference.

Jack

EDIT Media material page
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/LCROSS/m...ia_telecon.html
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
silylene
post Oct 22 2010, 01:56 PM
Post #12


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 84
Joined: 24-November 04
Member No.: 111



Happily, I find I correctly predicted finding Hg in permanently shadowed craters on the moon, in 2008, according to the same mechanism now being offered:

http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.p...mp;#entry165706
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
nprev
post Feb 18 2011, 10:03 PM
Post #13


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 7141
Joined: 8-December 05
From: Los Angeles
Member No.: 602



Apologies for thread revival, but I've not seen this visible light image of the LCROSS impact plume before.

Main article.


--------------------
A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 22nd November 2014 - 09:19 PM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.