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Concepción, The freshest crater yet to be explored
volcanopele
post Jan 27 2010, 09:30 PM
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What data could Opportunity collect that might help pin the age down? I take it radioisotope ratios are out laugh.gif


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Stu
post Jan 27 2010, 09:54 PM
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Yep, (Frasier Crane voice)... I'm listening... smile.gif

Some fun for now...

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ElkGroveDan
post Jan 27 2010, 10:15 PM
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QUOTE (volcanopele @ Jan 27 2010, 01:30 PM) *
What data could Opportunity collect that might help pin the age down? I take it radioisotope ratios are out laugh.gif

Exactly. So why are they so certain that it's 1000 years old? Do they have a better crystal ball than me?


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hendric
post Jan 27 2010, 10:55 PM
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Is it me, or do the rocks around the crater even look "fresher"? There aren't any small cobbles around each larger rock, for example.


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brellis
post Jan 27 2010, 11:03 PM
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EGDan, thanks for the info on rock sizes and thank goodness Oppy's rolling on solid ground! I had the pleasure of being tickled by a rover rolling over me at the JPL Open house a few years ago, so I know she can at least climb over a bump-on-a-log my size! laugh.gif
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Phil Stooke
post Jan 27 2010, 11:23 PM
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"why are they so certain that it's 1000 years old? "

I wouldn't be overly concerned about this - it's probably just a guess, meaning its preserved ejecta deposit suggests it is most likely very young compared with the other little craters we've seen frequently in the past. Actual number of years - not important. Like when I say I'm 39. Still. Or was it 49?

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marswiggle
post Jan 27 2010, 11:24 PM
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Made this HiRise anaglyph of Concepcion, magnified to 200 %. The inside of the crater seems to be completely enshrouded with the dark dust typically filling many smaller Meridiani craters.
Somehow I too have hard time imagining that this crater was just 994 years old when Oppy landed. (Excuse my literal interpretation.)
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glennwsmith
post Jan 28 2010, 01:30 AM
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Stu, cool picture. I think we can see the "ray" of ejecta that goes off to the southeast. With this photo, one really gets the feeling of something having smacked into Mars at a very high velocity.
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Stu
post Jan 28 2010, 06:18 AM
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GREAT 3D overhead view of Concepcion, thanks for posting that!


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climber
post Jan 28 2010, 12:09 PM
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No big relief differences to expect any significant wind change effects = cleaning events. I would expect some slight effects around Concepción the only "relief" around.
BTW we didn't saw the full deck for quite a while to assess sand deposition. IF we get this 360° panorama we'll probably get more infos on this since the deck is always included.
Globally I'll add that, even if marswiggle 3D is nice, the view from the ground is much better than I was expecting.


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ustrax
post Jan 28 2010, 12:36 PM
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QUOTE (fredk @ Jan 27 2010, 09:31 PM) *
To answer Ustrax's querries from the other thread...


OK, thanks Fred, so Bopulu is on Oppy field of view is that correct? Can someone point where to look if the crater was visible?
New pancams are down but no sign of the horizon...or Concepción unsure.gif


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MahFL
post Jan 28 2010, 02:58 PM
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We would not want to jam a wheel up again with a potato would we ? unsure.gif
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ElkGroveDan
post Jan 28 2010, 03:04 PM
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QUOTE (MahFL @ Jan 28 2010, 06:58 AM) *
We would not want to jam a wheel up again with a potato would we ? unsure.gif


The "potato" jam issues have been caused by small rocks mixed with lots of soft sand that the wheels were buried in. It's always something to watch for, but these environs involve firmer ground. It's difficult to imagine a way of placing a rock inside a wheel cavity unless that wheel is mired in something. As noted previously, this is the kind of terrain the rovers were designed FOR.


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Marz
post Jan 28 2010, 07:55 PM
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edit: sorry, the MI was from sol 2119. I was just hoping they'd find another RAT target here.

Looks like the RAT found another worthy target?
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportuni...X7P2996M2M1.JPG

Are we in for an mossbauer integration soak now? I presume the goal is to continue measuring the sulfate rocks as we work our way down through the layers.

Is it just me, or are there less and less blueberries as we go?
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climber
post Jan 28 2010, 09:44 PM
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QUOTE (Marz @ Jan 28 2010, 08:55 PM) *
Is it just me, or are there less and less blueberries as we go?

We've got Hills now, why do you want Blueberries? laugh.gif


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