IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

7 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 > »   
Reply to this topicStart new topic
New Pluto images discussed
stevesliva
post Feb 2 2010, 10:25 PM
Post #16


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1169
Joined: 14-October 05
From: Seattle
Member No.: 530



Searched sci.astro.hubble for "Kuiper."

QUOTE
DAILY REPORT #5021
PERIOD COVERED: 5am January 27 - 5am January 28, 2010 (DOY 027/10:00z-028/10:00z) WFC3/UVIS/IR 11644
A Dynamical-Compositional Survey of the Kuiper Belt: A New Window Into the Formation of the Outer Solar System
The eight planets overwhelmingly dominate the solar system by mass, but their small numbers, coupled with their stochastic pasts, make it impossible to construct a unique formation history from the dynamical or compositional characteristics of them alone. In contrast, the huge numbers of small bodies scattered throughout and even beyond the planets, while insignificant by mass, provide an almost unlimited number of probes of the statistical conditions, history, and interactions in the solar system. To date, attempts to understand the formation and evolution of the Kuiper Belt have largely been dynamical
simulations where a hypothesized starting condition is evolved under the gravitational influence of the early giant planets and an attempt is made to reproduce the current observed populations. With little compositional information known for the real Kuiper Belt, the test particles in the simulation are free to have any formation location and history as long as they end at the correct point. Allowing compositional information to guide and constrain the formation,
thermal, and collisional histories of these objects would add an entire new dimension to our understanding of the evolution of the outer solar system. While ground based compositional studies have hit their flux limits already with only a few objects sampled, we propose to exploit the new capabilities of WFC3 to perform the first ever large-scale dynamical-compositional study of Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) and their progeny to study the chemical, dynamical, and
collisional history of the region of the giant planets. The sensitivity of the WFC3 observations will allow us to go up to two magnitudes deeper than our ground based studies, allowing us the capability of optimally selecting a target list for a large survey rather than simply taking the few objects that can be measured, as we have had to do to date. We have carefully constructed a sample of 120 objects which provides both overall breadth, for a general
understanding of these objects, plus a large enough number of objects in the individual dynamical subclass to allow detailed comparison between and within these groups. These objects will likely define the core Kuiper Belt compositional sample for years to come. While we have many specific results anticipated to come from this survey, as with any project where the field is rich, our current knowledge level is low, and a new instrument suddenly appears which can exploit vastly larger segments of the population, the potential for discovery -- both anticipated and not -- is extraordinary.


Mike Brown has been hinting at thoughts along those lines. i.e., when we found Santa and Easterbunny, they were points of light, now we're learning a lot more...

So they looked at Pluto and 119 of its closest friends.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Hungry4info
post Feb 2 2010, 10:27 PM
Post #17


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1020
Joined: 26-July 08
Member No.: 4270



That, almost certainly, is what this is about.


--------------------
-- Hungry4info (Sirius_Alpha)
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ElkGroveDan
post Feb 2 2010, 10:49 PM
Post #18


Senior Member
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 4660
Joined: 15-March 05
From: Sloughhouse, CA
Member No.: 197



I get the feeling that rather than some kind of numeric study of relationships between bodies, it will relate to specific images of Pluto, its family and distinct observations made thereof.


--------------------
If Occam had heard my theory, things would be very different now.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ngunn
post Feb 2 2010, 10:52 PM
Post #19


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 3170
Joined: 4-November 05
From: North Wales
Member No.: 542



Well done stevesliva! (Now, what's going on in the rest of the universe?)

EDIT: But you could be right EGD!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
volcanopele
post Feb 3 2010, 12:05 AM
Post #20


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 2864
Joined: 11-February 04
From: Tucson, AZ
Member No.: 23



If the dates covered in that post are the dates the data was acquired, I strongly doubt the upcoming press conference is related to it. One week is just not enough time to interpret the spectra obtained and organize them into spectral classes, IMHO. I'm with Dan on this. Based on Mike Brown's tweet, I would also expect improved knowledge of the distribution of methane ices on the surfaces of Pluto and Charon.


--------------------
&@^^!% Jim! I'm a geologist, not a physicist!
The Gish Bar Times - A Blog all about Jupiter's Moon Io
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
stevesliva
post Feb 3 2010, 01:07 AM
Post #21


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1169
Joined: 14-October 05
From: Seattle
Member No.: 530



QUOTE (volcanopele @ Feb 2 2010, 08:05 PM) *
If the dates covered in that post are the dates the data was acquired, I strongly doubt the upcoming press conference is related to it.


I was wondering about that, too. Almost immediate. But there was surprisingly nothing earlier. Different keywords might help.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
NGC3314
post Feb 3 2010, 02:22 AM
Post #22


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 86
Joined: 9-November 07
Member No.: 3958



The archive lists 472 observations to date on program 11644, some back in September 2009, so they could possibly have enough results from that to talk about. This gets images from 0.6-1.5 microns, a couple of sets per object. Looks like they have more than half their sample observed already.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Hungry4info
post Feb 3 2010, 01:22 PM
Post #23


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1020
Joined: 26-July 08
Member No.: 4270



Doing a little research, I find that HST has already directly detected dark spots on Pluto.


--------------------
-- Hungry4info (Sirius_Alpha)
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ElkGroveDan
post Feb 3 2010, 02:15 PM
Post #24


Senior Member
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 4660
Joined: 15-March 05
From: Sloughhouse, CA
Member No.: 197



Dark spots indeed. As we are a day away still, I'll go ahead and post these "best so-far" images of Pluto including the surface map generated from a full rotation over 6 days in 1994. The colored image I believe is from that same sequence. And then the 2006 image which captured the whole family.

If these were taken with the "old" Hubble I can't wait to see what the new and improved version looks like.
Attached thumbnail(s)
Attached Image
Attached Image
Attached Image
Attached Image

 


--------------------
If Occam had heard my theory, things would be very different now.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Hungry4info
post Feb 3 2010, 02:39 PM
Post #25


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1020
Joined: 26-July 08
Member No.: 4270



This image has my vote for "the best so far."
Attached thumbnail(s)
Attached Image
 


--------------------
-- Hungry4info (Sirius_Alpha)
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
tedstryk
post Feb 3 2010, 05:36 PM
Post #26


Interplanetary Dumpster Diver
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 4243
Joined: 17-February 04
From: Powell, TN
Member No.: 33



Here is a more natural take on one of the 1996 images (not my work).



--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
elakdawalla
post Feb 3 2010, 05:48 PM
Post #27


Bloggette par Excellence
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 4474
Joined: 4-August 05
From: Pasadena, CA, USA, Earth
Member No.: 454



Ted and Hungry4info, what are the sources of those two images?


--------------------
My blog - @elakdawalla on Twitter - Please support unmannedspaceflight.com by donating here.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Hungry4info
post Feb 3 2010, 05:55 PM
Post #28


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1020
Joined: 26-July 08
Member No.: 4270



Ted's is HST (And was posted by ElkGroveDan as well). The one I posted is from Keck.


--------------------
-- Hungry4info (Sirius_Alpha)
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
machi
post Feb 3 2010, 06:47 PM
Post #29


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 646
Joined: 27-February 08
From: Heart of Europe
Member No.: 4057



QUOTE (ElkGroveDan @ Feb 3 2010, 03:15 PM) *
If these were taken with the "old" Hubble I can't wait to see what the new and improved version looks like.


I don't think, that new images will be with much better resolution, than old ones. Old images were taken in UV by FOC camera and these images were diffraction limited.
All new cameras in Hubble have bigger pixel sizes. But new cameras have much better sensitivity, so I expect images with much better contrast.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Hungry4info
post Feb 3 2010, 06:49 PM
Post #30


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1020
Joined: 26-July 08
Member No.: 4270



Are you sure? Comparing the images of Jupiter from WFPC2 and 3, it sure looked a whole lot more detailed.


--------------------
-- Hungry4info (Sirius_Alpha)
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

7 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 > » 
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 1st November 2014 - 10:30 AM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.