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New Pluto images discussed
JohnVV
post Feb 12 2010, 08:25 AM
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just something i have been working on while taking a break from the remapping of the Clementine uvis
-- the map is 2048x1024.png --

based on the color map by:Marc Buie
the left is -180.0 , center is 0 and the right is 180.0
top 90 north
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imipak
post Feb 13 2010, 07:48 PM
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Terrestrial climatology's a banned topic here; I'm mentioning this term *solely* in the context of outer planets, icy moons and suchlike.

As I understand it, the proposed mechanism for the Iapetus dichotomy and perhaps for Pluto's changing regional albedo and colour sounds like it might be analagous to a (hypothesised) phenomena known as "the albedo flip feedback". I won't describe it here, except to say that the basic idea is of temperature-related albedo changes feeding back on themselves. The question, then, is: are these outer solar-system surface albedo variations examples of A.F.F., or is A.F.F. an example of an Iapetus / Pluto / (others?) process? (And who gets to decide, anyway? Call the IAU! biggrin.gif )

Does anyone know of diagrams plotting the phase spaces of the sort of gunk we might expect to see on the surface of KBOs, TNOs and Pluto, as sun-centred concentric bands? (Mebbe there are too many different species of tholins, all with slightly different temp/phase characteristics, to make that practical?) I can visualise Pluto's eccentric orbit crossing many such bands as it approaches and recedes from the sun along it's orbit, causing assorted varieties of rains, snows, hails, steams, fogs, geysers and sublimation. Perhaps you'd end up with something like a... (FSM forgive me!) ... cryo-Io, plus Titan-like surface liquid features, *plus* the sort of wacky features the CO2 condensation / sublimation cycle produces at the Martian poles. (Swiss cheese terrain, the spiders, deep canyons in the ice-caps, strong seasonal winds, etc.)

...or perhaps I should stop eating farmhouse cheddar at bedtime.


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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Feb 20 2010, 11:01 AM
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I'm trying to get an idea of Pluto's "real" color, surely there's no "yellow" in it??? huh.gif

We don't get wiser with the new NASA lithos so far:
http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/62223main_Pluto.Lithograph.pdf
http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/62223main_Pluto_Lithograph.pdf



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Juramike
post Feb 20 2010, 02:22 PM
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QUOTE (imipak @ Feb 13 2010, 02:48 PM) *
Does anyone know of diagrams plotting the phase spaces of the sort of gunk we might expect to see on the surface of KBOs, TNOs and Pluto, as sun-centred concentric bands?


That is a brilliant question. AFAIK I've not seen one, but the data just gotta be out there somewhere.

Effectively you'd be generating a "snow line", "methane line", and "ammonia line", etc.

It'd be dependent on pressure and size of the body of course, but you could lock those down as the "typical largest N2 atmospheric pressure that a Titan/Ganymede/Pluto/Triton sized body could support over a billion year period" - whatever that would be.

It' should be really useful graphic for illustrating planetary formation and evolution conditions.

EDIT:
Useful starting points:
http://www.lpi.usra.edu/books/MESSII/9028.pdf
http://weft.astro.washington.edu/courses/a...557/LODDERS.pdf (especially Table 10)
http://arxiv.org/PS_cache/arxiv/pdf/0806/0806.3788v2.pdf



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Some higher resolution images available at my photostream: http://www.flickr.com/photos/31678681@N07/
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djellison
post Feb 20 2010, 04:02 PM
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QUOTE (PhilCo126 @ Feb 20 2010, 11:01 AM) *
surely there's no "yellow" in it???


WHy not?
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JohnVV
post Feb 20 2010, 06:21 PM
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"surely there's no "yellow" in it???"
"WHy not? "
see:
http://hubblesite.org/pubinfo/pdf/2010/06/pdf1.pdf
http://hubblesite.org/pubinfo/pdf/2010/06/pdf2.pdf

according to the pdf's that is the color and Charon is a bit on the red
[attachment=20777:JVV_Charon.png]
these are just best guess from the 12 px Hubble images
the above sort of looks like

know what i see canals
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Guest_Lunik9_*
post Sep 20 2010, 03:59 PM
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Most NASA artist's impressions show a red-colored Pluto as red points to an advanced age. Moreover, under the influence of UV-sunlight tholin molecules might arise with a predominantly red color. mars.gif
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