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(Paper) Evidence of a Jovian Mass Solar Companion in the Oort Cloud?
centsworth_II
post Oct 4 2010, 06:57 PM
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Flurry of tweets at #dps2010:

"Hal Levison proposing protoplanetary disks of *other* nearby stars as source of Oort Cloud comets..."
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dmuller
post Oct 4 2010, 11:41 PM
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QUOTE (nprev @ Oct 2 2010, 06:42 PM) *
Since it involves the masses of two bodies, I guess that a sufficiently massive planet could be in solar orbit at a considerable distance (much greater than I'd thought possible).

I thought that the two masses involved in the calculation are M = mass of center of Milky Way (or entire MW?) and m = mass of Sun, making the hillsphere not a variable of whatever circles around the Sun. I may be very very wrong though!


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brellis
post Oct 4 2010, 11:49 PM
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Is there a way to measure the 'wobble' of our own beloved star? Could it be reflected in position data from the Voyagers or Pioneer?
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Guest_Lunik9_*
post Oct 5 2010, 11:27 AM
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Interesting Tyche theory but different with the Nemesis theory, as the latter is about a Brown Dwarf object (12 to 75 Jupiter masses) or a Red Dwarf star. Tyche theory speaks about a Jovian mass planet 1 to 4 Jupiter masses.
When PAN-STARRS & LSST become operational, astronomers will find out more and we'll see if the sharp outer edge of the Edgeworth-Kuiper belt (and the inclined orbits of SDOs) can be explained.
I believe there's even a theory of a Black Hole in the vicinity of the outer Oort cloud?
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Greg Hullender
post Oct 5 2010, 04:08 PM
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QUOTE (Lunik9 @ Oct 5 2010, 03:27 AM) *
Interesting Tyche theory but different with the Nemesis theory, . . . I believe there's even a theory of a Black Hole in the vicinity of the outer Oort cloud?

I think you mean "hypothesis" not "theory" here. From the lack of press releases on the subject from WISE, my own hypothesis is that they didn't find any of these objects within a light year of Sol.

--Greg
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qraal
post Dec 22 2010, 09:55 AM
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Another paper available on the arXiv which is germane to this discussion is Lorenzo Iorio's piece...

The perihelion precession of Saturn, planet X/Nemesis and MOND

...the abstract of which I quote...

QUOTE
We show that the retrograde perihelion precession of Saturn \Delta\dot\varpi, recently estimated by different teams of astronomers by processing ranging data from the Cassini spacecraft and amounting to some milliarcseconds per century, can be explained in terms of a localized, distant body X, not yet directly discovered. From the determination of its tidal parameter K = GM_X/r_X^3 as a function of its ecliptic longitude \lambda_X and latitude \beta_X, we calculate the distance at which X may exist for different values of its mass, ranging from the size of Mars to that of the Sun. The minimum distance would occur for X located perpendicularly to the ecliptic, while the maximum distance is for X lying in the ecliptic. We find for rock-ice planets of the size of Mars and the Earth that they would be at about 80-150 au, respectively, while a Jupiter-sized gaseous giant would be at approximately 1 kau. A typical brown dwarf would be located at about 4 kau, while an object with the mass of the Sun would be at approximately 10 kau, so that it could not be Nemesis for which a solar mass and a heliocentric distance of about 88 kau are predicted. If X was directed towards a specific direction, i.e. that of the Galactic Center, it would mimick the action of a recently proposed form of the External Field Effect (EFE) in the framework of the MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND).
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kap
post Jul 25 2011, 09:57 PM
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QUOTE (qraal @ Dec 22 2010, 01:55 AM) *
Another paper available on the arXiv which is germane to this discussion is Lorenzo Iorio's piece...

The perihelion precession of Saturn, planet X/Nemesis and MOND

...the abstract of which I quote...


Am I correct in thinking only a captured body could be in orbit completely perpendicular to the ecliptic? Something 80-150 AU and the size of Mars or greater certainly would have been seen by now, even if it's orbit was extremely inclined. Unless it's somehow being obscured...

-kap
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