IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

 
Reply to this topicStart new topic
JOVE - Jupiter Orbiter (1967)
gndonald
post May 20 2010, 02:11 PM
Post #1


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 208
Joined: 19-July 05
Member No.: 442



With Juno approaching it's launch year, I thought it might be worthwhile to look at an earlier design for a Jupiter Polar Orbiter.

JOVE (Jupiter Orbiting Vehicle for Exploration) was designed by faculty of the University of Auburn (Alabama) in the mid-late 1960s as part of a NASA sponsored systems engineering course.

The proposed spacecraft was a 3.6 metric tonne orbiter that would have been launched by a Saturn V sometime between 1975-1980. After a voyage lasting between 800 to 900 days the spacecraft would be inserted into an elliptical polar orbit of Jupiter with a closest approach of no lower than 7 Jupiter radii, after an initial period of mesurement this would be reduced to no lower than 4 Jupiter radii.

To meet the mission objectives of measuring the planets temperature and geomagnetic properties, the spacecraft would carry the following instrument types:

1. Solar Wind/Flare detectors
2. Cosmic Ray detectors
3. Micrometeorite detectors
4. Magnetometers
5. Trapped radiation detectors
6. Radiometers & photometers
7. UV/Visible/IR Spectrographs
8. Wide (10) & Narrow (1) angle television cameras. (Resolution at 7 Jupiter Radii Wide angle (150km), Narrow Angle (35km), at 4 Jupiter Radii. 70km & 18km respectively.)

Power was to be supplyed by eight RTGs supplying a total of 640w.

Perhaps of interest to the discussion on the value of cameras on Juno is this quote from the JOVE report:

QUOTE
The use of television greatly increases the data storage problem but this is justified by the greater resolution that is obtainable over Earth-based telescopes, as well as the favorable public relations effect of "pictures" of Jupiter.


Something I feel is as valid now as it was back then.

See: JOVE, Jupiter orbiting vehicle for exploration. Volume 1 - Mission and system study, Final report (15.1mb)
Attached thumbnail(s)
Attached Image
 
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Mariner9
post May 20 2010, 07:06 PM
Post #2


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 216
Joined: 13-October 05
Member No.: 528



Good stuff! I remember reading a lot of different studies over the years, but I don't remember this one.

A couple interesting chuckles (with the benefit of 40 years of follow on history). Gotta love the idea of using a Saturn V launch vehicle, an amazingly expensive booster. The original Viking studies (possibly when it was still called Voyager) also used that idea if memory serves.

I find it interesting that the notion of adding a camera was ever controversial. I think the Jupiter Pioneers added the "cameras" (or photometers, or whatever) under a similar public outreach idea. Forty years later they still had to be convinced to add a camera to Juno for a similar reason, as if taking medium resolution images of the polar regions of Jupiter is only good for public relations. I gotta think there are a lot of atmospheric sciences people who are really looking forward to those pictures.

On a similar note, I remember reading that it was a debate to include a camera on the Mercury Mariner 10 mission! Someone in the chain of command (on the science side) didn't think that imaging was class one science! Now, I can see the argument that a mission like Juno or Pioneer Jupiter has most of the focus on particle and fields studies, gravity measurments, and such, and that the study of cloud tops is secondary.... but forgoing a camera on a Mercury mission?????

A solid body never before seen close up, and the topography is just not that important..... sure, OK, whatever. smile.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
gndonald
post May 21 2010, 12:12 AM
Post #3


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 208
Joined: 19-July 05
Member No.: 442



QUOTE (Mariner9 @ May 21 2010, 03:06 AM) *
Good stuff! I remember reading a lot of different studies over the years, but I don't remember this one.

A couple interesting chuckles (with the benefit of 40 years of follow on history). Gotta love the idea of using a Saturn V launch vehicle, an amazingly expensive booster. The original Viking studies (possibly when it was still called Voyager) also used that idea if memory serves.


Rather ironically (from the point of view of the name) JOVE started out as an attempt to adapt Voyager (Mars) to a Jupiter mission.

QUOTE (Mariner9 @ May 21 2010, 03:06 AM) *
I find it interesting that the notion of adding a camera was ever controversial. I think the Jupiter Pioneers added the "cameras" (or photometers, or whatever) under a similar public outreach idea. Forty years later they still had to be convinced to add a camera to Juno for a similar reason, as if taking medium resolution images of the polar regions of Jupiter is only good for public relations. I gotta think there are a lot of atmospheric sciences people who are really looking forward to those pictures.


I have no doubt of that, but the part of the paragraph I didn't quote (pg 125 of the pdf) specifically indicates that the cameras were there for the atmosphere specialists and implies that the discussion was more on what type of camera to send.

QUOTE (Mariner9 @ May 21 2010, 03:06 AM) *
On a similar note, I remember reading that it was a debate to include a camera on the Mercury Mariner 10 mission! Someone in the chain of command (on the science side) didn't think that imaging was class one science! Now, I can see the argument that a mission like Juno or Pioneer Jupiter has most of the focus on particle and fields studies, gravity measurments, and such, and that the study of cloud tops is secondary.... but forgoing a camera on a Mercury mission?????

A solid body never before seen close up, and the topography is just not that important..... sure, OK, whatever. smile.gif


Actually that is where the JOVE report gets interesting, there is a total focus on Jupiter, the moons only get a look in as something the probe might hit after it shuts down (Planetary protection back then was very different, they were more worried about the probe impacting the Jovian atmosphere than hitting the moons.), as the quote below from page 127 of the PDF shows.

QUOTE
Resolution on the order of 60-70 kilometers will allow observation of some structure in the red spot, boundaries between the latitude bands, and behavior of the general circulation around the edges of the red spot. The TV cameras will also get information regarding the meteorology of the outer Jovian atmosphere. On the dark side of the planet, the TV experiment will show lightning flashes and near the limb aurora effects will be shown expecially(sic) within 10 - 30 of the magnetic poles.


But then with the cameras planned for JOVE taking 45 images an orbit between them (4 Wide Angle/41 Narrow Angle), and then sending them immediately back to Earth, they had to focus on something.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 2nd October 2014 - 04:33 PM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.