IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

28 Pages V   1 2 3 > »   
Reply to this topicStart new topic
MSL development & assembly, Until it's shipped to the Cape
climber
post Mar 29 2010, 08:11 PM
Post #1


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2627
Joined: 14-February 06
From: Very close to the Pyrénées Mountains (France)
Member No.: 682



In case you missed it there's 9 minutes on MSL (actual hardware visible) + 5 minutes with Dr Elachi on "This week in Space" there: http://www.spaceflightnow.com/
14 minutes out of 23 regarding Unmanned, not bad.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
punkboi
post May 21 2010, 01:12 AM
Post #2


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 533
Joined: 25-October 05
From: California
Member No.: 535



Looks like NASA is planning to launch MSL between Nov. 25 and Dec. 18, 2011

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?rele...elease_2010-171


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
punkboi
post Jun 2 2010, 07:32 AM
Post #3


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 533
Joined: 25-October 05
From: California
Member No.: 535



High Gain Antenna for the Curiosity rover is en route to JPL

http://www.satnews.com/cgi-bin/story.cgi?number=525858649


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
punkboi
post Jun 12 2010, 01:33 AM
Post #4


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 533
Joined: 25-October 05
From: California
Member No.: 535



NASA Dryden Hosts Radar Tests for Next Mars Landing

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2010-197

Engineers with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., are running diverse trials with a test version of the radar system that will enable NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission to put the Curiosity rover onto the Martian surface in August 2012.

One set of tests conducted over a desert lakebed at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., in May 2010 used flights with a helicopter simulating specific descent paths anticipated for Martian sites.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
climber
post Jun 12 2010, 07:44 AM
Post #5


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2627
Joined: 14-February 06
From: Very close to the Pyrénées Mountains (France)
Member No.: 682



Very nice topic actually. BTW, do we know the dead line to get MSL sent to the Cape?


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
punkboi
post Jun 12 2010, 06:11 PM
Post #6


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 533
Joined: 25-October 05
From: California
Member No.: 535



Spacecraft are usually sent to the Cape 3 months before launch...though in Spirit and Opportunity's case, they were delivered to Cape Canaveral 4-5 months before launch (January 2003, while Spirit launched in June and Opportunity launched in July of that year)

If MSL launches in November of 2011, then early summer going on the assumption above smile.gif


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ElkGroveDan
post Jun 12 2010, 07:14 PM
Post #7


Senior Member
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 4660
Joined: 15-March 05
From: Sloughhouse, CA
Member No.: 197



If they want a really robust test location to simulate unknown Martian landing conditions they should go to the desert areas in and around Joshua Tree National Park.


--------------------
If Occam had heard my theory, things would be very different now.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
nprev
post Jun 12 2010, 11:51 PM
Post #8


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 7098
Joined: 8-December 05
From: Los Angeles
Member No.: 602



Do we know the means by which MSL will be sent to the Cape yet (i.e., airlift or overland)?


--------------------
A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
djellison
post Jun 13 2010, 12:05 AM
Post #9


Administrator
****

Group: Chairman
Posts: 13815
Joined: 8-February 04
Member No.: 1



Oh - I don't think they've overlanded a spacecraft in years have they? Bound to be an airlift.

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
nprev
post Jun 13 2010, 12:12 AM
Post #10


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 7098
Joined: 8-December 05
From: Los Angeles
Member No.: 602



For some reason, I thought that the MERs went overland. I know that JPL has (or had) a fairly robust overland transport infrastructure for moving spacecraft. (I think airlift's the way to go, though, definitely.)


--------------------
A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
stevesliva
post Jun 13 2010, 01:35 AM
Post #11


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1169
Joined: 14-October 05
From: Seattle
Member No.: 530



QUOTE (nprev @ Jun 12 2010, 08:12 PM) *
(I think airlift's the way to go, though, definitely.)


http://www.afrc.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123137819

Googled around assuming it would be placed on a C-17. Bingo.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Guest_Enceladus75_*
post Jun 13 2010, 01:52 AM
Post #12





Guests






Wasn't Galileo transported back and forth from the Cape to California via road overland? And wasn't the overland mode blamed for the removal of lubricant from that high gain antenna which never was able to open fully?

I would hope ALL deep space unmanned craft were transported to the launch site via airlift. And if not, by sea.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
nprev
post Jun 13 2010, 02:39 AM
Post #13


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 7098
Joined: 8-December 05
From: Los Angeles
Member No.: 602



I think Galileo actually went back & forth between the Cape & JPL several times due to launch delays, and that eventually hosed the lubricant.

Very happy to hear that MSL's definitely flying; a C-17 is a nice, safe, smooth ride! smile.gif


--------------------
A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
centsworth_II
post Jun 13 2010, 02:59 AM
Post #14


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2061
Joined: 28-December 04
Member No.: 132



QUOTE (nprev @ Jun 12 2010, 07:12 PM) *
For some reason, I thought that the MERs went overland....
Could be the first sentence from chapter 10 of Roving Mars.

"At 5 A.M. on February 22, 2003, a truck convoy left JPL, carrying the MER-2 rover to Florida. In a nice dramatic touch, a magnitude 5.4 earthquake hit southern California just forty minutes before the trucks rolled..."
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
nprev
post Jun 13 2010, 04:26 AM
Post #15


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 7098
Joined: 8-December 05
From: Los Angeles
Member No.: 602



Probably. Time to reread that anyhow; thanks for the reminder $0.02! smile.gif


--------------------
A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

28 Pages V   1 2 3 > » 
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 31st October 2014 - 11:49 PM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.