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Geomorphology of Cape York and Solander Point, Examining Opportunity's destination at Endeavour Crater
fredk
post Feb 10 2011, 05:28 PM
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This is great - thanks Pete. Have you tested your calculations on a known target, like Santa Maria or Victoria and gotten reasonable numbers?

How easy is it to do more profiles? Is it feasible to do several cutting right across Cape York so we can see if the results are consistent?

Anyway, such a short Cape York would certainly explain why we haven't spotted it yet.
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PDP8E
post Feb 10 2011, 06:18 PM
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Pete., your Hirise DEM profile of Cape York is very snazzy! Thank you. I agree that the cape is kind of
short compared to what the overhead shot 'implies' (and the fact the we haven't seen it yet!)


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eoincampbell
post Feb 11 2011, 01:55 AM
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So Cape York appears to be quite a bit inside Endeavor's "rim slope", I wonder when it will come into view, as sudden as Santa Maria ?...


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pgrindrod
post Feb 11 2011, 02:38 PM
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Let's see if we can get anything else out of my DEM around Cape York.

I follow the standard USGS way of making these DEMs, so I'm happy with the method, it's just that the results can vary from place to place. I haven't made one around Victoria because, well, it had already been done, and Santa Maria was just off this stereo pair. But Doug and I had some success with a DEM of the pathfinder landing site (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uE_Ih0hgnlw), and I'm churning these out for my science at the moment and they match up well with MOLA, CTX, HRSC data. I guess Cape York is actually a nice test!

Profiles are no problem, but they're all pretty similar - the local slope into Endeavour just drowns most of the Cape York signal. That could be correct, or it could just be affecting the way that the DEM came out.
Attached Image


Here's a 3D perspective of Cape York, with a crazy x7 vertical exaggeration.
Attached Image


Looks pretty, but I wouldn't bet the house on it!
Pete
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pgrindrod
post Feb 11 2011, 02:47 PM
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And while I'm filling up the place with images, I had a look at the visibility of Cape York from where Oppy might enter my DEM area.

First up a CTX base DEM with Oppy (green dot) just inside my HiRISE area. It shows up the relative depth of Endeavour compared to the really flat plains.
Attached Image


Then a visibility map (viewshed) of the raw unfiltered (hence noise) 1 m DEM from Oppy at the green dot. Cape York is not visibile as we'd expect.
Attached Image


I tried one the other way around, from the highest point at Cape York and basically you can only really see into the crater. So I guess if I'm right we won't see Cape York until we're right on it, but I'd be happy to be wrong.

Pete
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ElkGroveDan
post Feb 11 2011, 03:03 PM
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I joked previously that maybe Cape York is nothing more than a stain on the ground. It looks like I wasn't far off.


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fredk
post Feb 11 2011, 03:23 PM
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Thanks again, Pete. Those profiles certainly look consistent with each other. Subtracting off the overall slope, the tallest section (blue) gives around 15 metres height, which is starting to sound reasonable:
Attached Image
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vikingmars
post Feb 12 2011, 12:09 PM
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QUOTE (fredk @ Feb 11 2011, 04:23 PM) *
Thanks again, Pete. Those profiles certainly look consistent with each other. Subtracting off the overall slope, the tallest section (blue) gives around 15 metres height, which is starting to sound reasonable:

... Meaning Cape York is well "climbable" by Oppy to get a better view (and to get a nice panorama) from its top : Endeavour's far rim and the other capes should give us a gorgeous view. Like many, I'm drooling over this upcoming view. Yum-Yum ! ... a "Yum-Yum" Pan. Bon Appetit ! (besides, it's lunch time right now in France) smile.gif
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BrianL
post Feb 12 2011, 03:53 PM
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Looking at that 3D view, Cape York seems less like a hill to climb, and more like a ledge to drive out onto. I am so looking forward to arrival day. I almost wish I could fast forward to that event. Except that would probably mean winter is just starting again, and I am really, really tired of winter right now. smile.gif
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climber
post Feb 12 2011, 08:43 PM
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QUOTE (BrianL @ Feb 12 2011, 04:53 PM) *
Looking at that 3D view, Cape York seems less like a hill to climb, and more like a ledge to drive out onto. I am so looking forward to arrival day. I almost wish I could fast forward to that event. Except that would probably mean winter is just starting again, and I am really, really tired of winter right now. smile.gif

What are you talking about? Arrival time will be by Easter tongue.gif biggrin.gif


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serpens
post Feb 12 2011, 11:05 PM
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QUOTE (fredk @ Feb 11 2011, 03:23 PM) *
Thanks again, Pete. Those profiles certainly look consistent with each other. Subtracting off the overall slope, the tallest section (blue) gives around 15 metres height, which is starting to sound reasonable:

Fred, I'm not sure I follow your logic here. Wouldn't a line of best fit along the plains approach section of the plot give the baseline to estimate the height of Cape York above the plain? I make the maximum height of the blue plot to be around three to four metres?
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fredk
post Feb 13 2011, 03:38 AM
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You might be right about that, but I think we'd need to see how the profiles look farther out to know for sure where the plains "start". And as others have said, if that overall slope is right, this isn't a hill, it's more like a ledge to drive out on.
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Stu
post Feb 13 2011, 07:31 AM
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Ok... trying to get my head around this... We're now thinking that Cape York isn't so much a "hill" as a kind of a "ledge" or platform sticking out from the inner slope of Endeavour...? Does that mean the hills that curve around the southern edge of the crater are the same? This is fascinating...

On another note, it was pleasing to find a LOT of interest in the MER mission last night when I gave an Outreach talk out at a little village just outside Kendal. "Mature" crowd, shall we say, general level of interest in science, but still, the ones who were aware that there are rovers on Mars were fascinated by them, and very impressed by what they've achieved.

So say we all.


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serpens
post Feb 13 2011, 08:15 AM
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The perennial problem with visual representations using axis with the same metric but different scales is the gut reaction 'gee that's steep'. It isn't a particularly steep gradient and rather than a ledge overlooking a chasm it is more of a low ridge with a (roughly) ten degree slope into the crater.
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Stu
post Feb 13 2011, 08:18 AM
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Gotcha, thanks.

Still... hill... ledge... island... ledge...

I need more tea.


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