IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

13 Pages V  « < 8 9 10 11 12 > »   
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Voyager mosaics and images of Jupiter, A fresh look at some ancient stuff
Ian R
post Jul 12 2011, 09:45 PM
Post #136


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 555
Joined: 18-July 05
From: Plymouth, UK
Member No.: 437



While browsing through the OPUS PDS archives, I came across this nice wide-angle view of Jupiter including the GRS and a moon shadow taken by Voyager 2:

Attached Image


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
machi
post Mar 1 2012, 12:24 AM
Post #137


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 660
Joined: 27-February 08
From: Heart of Europe
Member No.: 4057



Hi-res (~10 km/pix) mosaic of Jovian northern whirls and some other images of Jupiter from Voyager 2:



--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
elakdawalla
post Mar 1 2012, 01:49 AM
Post #138


Bloggette par Excellence
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 4503
Joined: 4-August 05
From: Pasadena, CA, USA, Earth
Member No.: 454



I love that little black dot at the right! It looks like a hole punched through the clouds. Great work, machi!


--------------------
My blog - @elakdawalla on Twitter - Please support unmannedspaceflight.com by donating here.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
machi
post Mar 1 2012, 05:31 PM
Post #139


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 660
Joined: 27-February 08
From: Heart of Europe
Member No.: 4057



Thanks!

"It looks like a hole punched through the clouds"
I think, that it's actually hole punched through the clouds. Or possibly more accurately - eye of a storm (cyclone).


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
AndyG
post Mar 1 2012, 07:23 PM
Post #140


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 574
Joined: 20-April 05
Member No.: 279



It looks a bit too dark and regular to me. I note it's about the same size as Amalthea's shadow would be ... a possibility?

Edit: No ... too far off the equator, I think, referring to the location photo placing this view on the wider globe. What about Himalia?

Andy
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ugordan
post Mar 1 2012, 07:26 PM
Post #141


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 3581
Joined: 1-October 05
From: Croatia
Member No.: 523



Hmm, it does look a bit too dark to be a cloud.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
john_s
post Mar 1 2012, 08:17 PM
Post #142


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 534
Joined: 3-December 04
From: Boulder, Colorado, USA
Member No.: 117



Pretty sure it is a cloud (or cloud hole), though- it's at the center of subtle concentric features in the surrounding clouds.

John
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Bjorn Jonsson
post Mar 1 2012, 08:18 PM
Post #143


IMG to PNG GOD
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 1522
Joined: 19-February 04
From: Near fire and ice
Member No.: 38



QUOTE (machi @ Mar 1 2012, 05:31 PM) *
Thanks!

"It looks like a hole punched through the clouds"
I think, that it's actually hole punched through the clouds. Or possibly more accurately - eye of a storm (cyclone).

Looking at the original images I agree. Also I'm pretty sure this can't be a satellite shadow anyway. The small inner satellites like Amalthea are too close to Jupiter to cast shadows this far from the equator and the more distant small satellites (e.g. Himalia) are too small and distant to cast dark shadows.

Very nice images.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
machi
post Mar 1 2012, 08:23 PM
Post #144


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 660
Joined: 27-February 08
From: Heart of Europe
Member No.: 4057



Darkness of this feature is caused by contrast enhancing procedure. So it's relatively dark, not absolutely.
Based on shape of this feature and its surroundings, it's central part of cyclone (anticlockwise rotation in northern hemisphere, in North-North Temperate Belt).


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
AndyG
post Mar 1 2012, 10:08 PM
Post #145


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 574
Joined: 20-April 05
Member No.: 279



Following a brief trip to Excel (and back) I am more than happy to accept this as a weather system!

Andy (still, a ~150km hole in a cyclone is something else!)
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
JohnVV
post Mar 1 2012, 11:52 PM
Post #146


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 535
Joined: 18-November 08
Member No.: 4489



a close up
[attachment=26501:Screenshot.png]
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
dilo
post Mar 2 2012, 07:02 AM
Post #147


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2492
Joined: 15-January 05
From: center Italy
Member No.: 150



Herebelow a mosaic zooming on the dark spot (I modified color dominance and smoothed John closeup):
Attached Image

Edit: added an intermediate image between last two...


--------------------
I always think before posting! - Marco -
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
vikingmars
post Mar 7 2012, 12:14 AM
Post #148


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 658
Joined: 19-February 05
From: Close to Meudon Observatory in France
Member No.: 172



QUOTE (dilo @ Mar 2 2012, 08:02 AM) *
Herebelow a mosaic zooming on the dark spot (I modified color dominance and smoothed John closeup):

Well : this was just the beginning...
Attached Image

laugh.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Bjorn Jonsson
post Mar 29 2012, 12:10 AM
Post #149


IMG to PNG GOD
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 1522
Joined: 19-February 04
From: Near fire and ice
Member No.: 38



A new Voyager 2 mosaic of the Great Red Spot:
Attached Image
Attached Image

In the version at left contrast has been increased and the image sharpened to enhance the visibility of small scale details. The one at right has approximately natural color and contrast.

These images are created from the same source data as this well known image but the new version is better.

The mosaic is composed of six color images each of which is created from one set of orange, green and violet images, thus a total of 18 images was used.

The images were obtained when Voyager 2 was 2.7 million km from Jupiter's center. Earlier I posted a mosaic of the Great Red Spot obtained at closer range that covered a somewhat smaller area. This mosaic was obtained about 30 hours (3 Jovian rotations) earlier than the closer-range mosaic. It's interesting to compare the two mosaics - the changes in this short period of time are remarkable.

The processing is similar to the processing described earlier in the thread (perhaps slightly improved).

And finally a relatively quick and dirty color composite using wide angle context images obtained at the same time:
Attached Image

Color and overall contrast is natural but the visibility of small scale details has been improved a bit using an unsharp mask. Significant time passed between the orange/green images and the violet image. This made color processing a bit difficult and in fact I only did rather rudimentary color correction which means that the color near the terminator and also near the limb is a bit less accurate than the color near the center of the image.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
tedstryk
post Mar 29 2012, 01:46 AM
Post #150


Interplanetary Dumpster Diver
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 4247
Joined: 17-February 04
From: Powell, TN
Member No.: 33



Simply incredible, Bjorn. That is the most beautiful Jupiter mosaic yet.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

13 Pages V  « < 8 9 10 11 12 > » 
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 22nd November 2014 - 09:25 PM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.