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New Horizons, Pluto and the Kuiper belt
Astro0
post Feb 3 2012, 05:55 AM
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Well done all so far. Spread the word to your friends.
http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/news_center/news/20120201.php

Note: We probably don't need everyone to post just to say that they have signed up. wink.gif
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Chmee
post Feb 5 2012, 03:16 AM
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Anyone else find it incredible that Pluto, one of the smallest major bodies of the solar system, has possibly 6 moons? What a complex system. It looks more and more that Pluto was whacked pretty hard at one point.
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nprev
post Feb 5 2012, 07:44 PM
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True. It will be most interesting (and revealing) if Pluto has a whopping big crater like Vesta.


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jasedm
post Feb 5 2012, 10:59 PM
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QUOTE (Chmee @ Feb 5 2012, 03:16 AM) *
Anyone else find it incredible that Pluto, one of the smallest major bodies of the solar system, has possibly 6 moons? What a complex system. It looks more and more that Pluto was whacked pretty hard at one point.



I suppose it has a lot to do with Pluto's Hill-sphere being immense (compared to everything inside Jupiter of course)
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Alan Stern
post Feb 11 2012, 02:22 PM
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Today, 9.99 AU to go: http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/news_center/news/20120210.php
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jasedm
post Feb 11 2012, 05:12 PM
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My anticipation's really building on the mission now - strange to think it's over half-way (in duration) and we're still 10 AU's out from the prime target.
I'm really really looking forward to that time where LORRI images exceed the resolution of Hubble, and landforms start to come into focus.

Congrats to Alan and team for lobbying so hard for the mission, and not taking no for an answer - I'm sure we don't know the half of what it took to make NH fly.

P.S. How's the moon count going?? wink.gif
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hendric
post Feb 17 2012, 07:28 PM
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Chmee,
I wouldn't be surprised if every large KBO in Pluto's class has a multiple-moon system. There just isn't enough stuff out there to perturb small moons enough to cause them to impact or escape.


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stevesliva
post Mar 8 2012, 01:15 AM
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https://twitter.com/#!/NewHorizons2015/...141884639129600
QUOTE
Hot news:!The Hubble Space Telescope will help New Horizons by searching hard for hazards like rings & moons. How many will Hubble find?


https://twitter.com/#!/NewHorizons2015/...140593523306498
QUOTE
Hurray for the HST Project for awarding New Horizons with 34 orbits of Hubble time to search for hazards around Pluto this summer!
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g4ayu
post Apr 10 2012, 08:38 AM
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Called in the local yesterday and found a new beer for sale smile.gif
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PFK
post Apr 13 2012, 01:34 PM
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QUOTE (g4ayu @ Apr 10 2012, 08:38 AM) *
Called in the local yesterday and found a new beer for sale smile.gif

Something to drink it from biggrin.gif
http://www.cafepress.com/+gale_crater_mars...stein,558114034
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Phil Stooke
post Jul 10 2012, 09:45 PM
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Nice presentation from the current SBAG meeting:

http://www.lpi.usra.edu/sbag/meetings/jul2...r_NH_Status.pdf

Phil



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nprev
post Jul 10 2012, 10:56 PM
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Wow. Thanks, Phil.

The collision hazard really seems to be taking center stage now with all the moon discoveries. Presumably the best way to see what's going on out there in advance is IR mapping of the system looking for dust & rings. Given the very low level of solar heating out there plus probable large uncertainties in putative dust/particle composition(s), what instruments are truly optimized (in terms of target IR wavelengths) for this search, if any?

Shame that SOFIA's in the middle of a maintenance cycle; that would've been my first choice.


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A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
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climber
post Jul 11 2012, 05:48 AM
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Nice to note that last TCM could be performed as late as 10 million kms from Pluto allowing more time to understand hazards around Pluto system... may be even using LORRI?
Knowing the high priority to keep the spacecraft safe, I guess we'll have less trajectory choices for next KBO encounters ?


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Paolo
post Jul 11 2012, 07:34 AM
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just announced in the IAU circulars: yet another satellite of Pluto!


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Drkskywxlt
post Jul 11 2012, 03:07 PM
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Any news on the orbit of P5? I can't find anything online yet.
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