IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

9 Pages V   1 2 3 > »   
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Big storm on Saturn
john_s
post Dec 15 2010, 12:37 AM
Post #1


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 534
Joined: 3-December 04
From: Boulder, Colorado, USA
Member No.: 117



The solar system is a happening place this week! I just learned of a major storm in Saturn's northern hemisphere, being monitored by the usual band of talented amateurs. See this site for a list of recent images. Chris Go's site has a particularly nice image.

John
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
nprev
post Dec 15 2010, 03:58 AM
Post #2


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 7144
Joined: 8-December 05
From: Los Angeles
Member No.: 602



That's a big 'un! Is Cassini in any kind of a position (both orbitally & in terms of planning flexibility) to snap a few close-ups?


--------------------
A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
volcanopele
post Dec 15 2010, 08:34 AM
Post #3


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 2864
Joined: 11-February 04
From: Tucson, AZ
Member No.: 23



Of course it is in a position, but always remember, Cassini observations are planned months in advance and changes in the observation plan almost never happen (trust me, we tried). Near the end of Rev142, there are a couple of quick imaging opportunities with the WAC but nothing extensive. The storm should be visible during the December 24 observation. The next orbit, Rev143 has many more Saturn observations, so hopefully the storm will stick around till then.


--------------------
&@^^!% Jim! I'm a geologist, not a physicist!
The Gish Bar Times - A Blog all about Jupiter's Moon Io
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
stevesliva
post Dec 16 2010, 06:55 PM
Post #4


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1174
Joined: 14-October 05
From: Seattle
Member No.: 530



I hate to ask this question, but I'm really curious. If Cassini had a scan platform, would on-demand retargeting be a lot more feasible? I'm thinking, yes, we'd simply be trading off imaging vs. imaging, not imaging vs. the whole suite. But I don't know enough about the sequencing. Would a spacecraft with a scan platform have a separate sequence for the scan platform that could be modified by itself?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Toma B
post Dec 16 2010, 07:31 PM
Post #5


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 620
Joined: 9-May 05
From: Subotica
Member No.: 384



Maybe Hubble Space Telescope can snap some nice image of this BIG NEW STORM.
Does any member of UMSF knows somebody in Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI)?


--------------------
The scientist does not study nature because it is useful; he studies it because he delights in it, and he delights in it because it is beautiful.
Jules H. Poincare

My "Astrophotos" gallery on flickr...
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
john_s
post Dec 16 2010, 11:56 PM
Post #6


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 534
Joined: 3-December 04
From: Boulder, Colorado, USA
Member No.: 117



QUOTE (stevesliva @ Dec 16 2010, 07:55 PM) *
I hate to ask this question, but I'm really curious. If Cassini had a scan platform, would on-demand retargeting be a lot more feasible?


It would certainly be simpler, but nothing in spacecraft operations is simple. There would still be numerous issues to be resolved- what pre-planned observations would be displaced, where would the data be put and when would they be downloaded, thermal implications of the new scan platform orientation would have to be checked, and new command sequences would have to be developed and tested. The Mars Rovers are always responding to new information on ~24 hour timescales, but they and their operations are designed from the ground up to be able to do that. Orbital missions are never that flexible.

John
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Ian R
post Dec 17 2010, 06:30 AM
Post #7


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 555
Joined: 18-July 05
From: Plymouth, UK
Member No.: 437



This seems to be a re-occurring phenomenon on Saturn - remember the large equatorial outbreak of 1990?

http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/r...s/1991/1991/04/

Of course, English actor and comedian Will Hay is famous for (probably) being the first astronomer to observe one of these white spots, back in 1933:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Will_Hay#Private_life


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Juramike
post Dec 25 2010, 12:13 AM
Post #8


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 2722
Joined: 10-November 06
From: Pasadena, CA
Member No.: 1345



Nice shot of Saturn storm taken by Cassini (props to VP): http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/imag...5/W00065990.jpg

Using the Solar System calculator to get the actual time of observation (caption indicated 1.323 M km away) sets it at 12/22/2010 23:40 UTC. This observation seemed like it would be nicely centered on Saturn's sunlight hemisphere and thus nicely visible from Earth.

Using a rotation rate of 10:47 h for Saturn, and propagating forward, here is an EXCEL table observation times where the storm should be centered on Saturn's visible disk on Earth. (Times are UTC and EST). Saturn rises around 3 AM and is better viewed closer to morning as it rises higher in the pre-dawn sky. I put "XXX" for view times where the storm is likely to be best. (Hopefully I got all the calculations right):

Attached File  Saturn_Storm_spotting_from_Earth__Dec_22_2010___Jan_4_2011_.xls ( 23.5K ) Number of downloads: 231




--------------------
Some higher resolution images available at my photostream: http://www.flickr.com/photos/31678681@N07/
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Ian R
post Dec 25 2010, 02:19 PM
Post #9


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 555
Joined: 18-July 05
From: Plymouth, UK
Member No.: 437



Attached Image


Right, I'm off to eat my Christmas dinner... wink.gif


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
centsworth_II
post Dec 25 2010, 06:30 PM
Post #10


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2081
Joined: 28-December 04
Member No.: 132



QUOTE (Ian R @ Dec 25 2010, 09:19 AM) *
Right, I'm off to eat my Christmas dinner... wink.gif

Thanks for the picture and... MERRY CHRISTMAS!
Attached Image
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
nprev
post Dec 25 2010, 06:46 PM
Post #11


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 7144
Joined: 8-December 05
From: Los Angeles
Member No.: 602



1. Wow. Look at that churned atmosphere! Remarkable.

2. Dude, Santa is like totally ripping that peak! laugh.gif Merry Christmas, all.


--------------------
A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
antipode
post Dec 25 2010, 10:28 PM
Post #12


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 151
Joined: 1-October 06
Member No.: 1206



Wow. It looks a *little* bit like Karman vortex street. I wonder what its 'downwind' of smile.gif

P
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
volcanopele
post Dec 27 2010, 04:14 PM
Post #13


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 2864
Joined: 11-February 04
From: Tucson, AZ
Member No.: 23



Images from December 24 are hitting the ground and the pages for them are on the JPL raw images page:

http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/photos/raw/rawi...?imageID=230977

Enjoy!

Even more dramatic in the BL1 filter:

http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/photos/raw/rawi...?imageID=230973


--------------------
&@^^!% Jim! I'm a geologist, not a physicist!
The Gish Bar Times - A Blog all about Jupiter's Moon Io
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Stu
post Dec 27 2010, 04:40 PM
Post #14


The Poet Dude
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 5548
Joined: 15-March 04
From: Kendal, Cumbria, UK
Member No.: 60



Fascinating...

Not really my planet, but I've had a go, just messing about really..

Attached Image


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ugordan
post Dec 27 2010, 05:41 PM
Post #15


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 3583
Joined: 1-October 05
From: Croatia
Member No.: 523



My quick version using CB2/GRN/BL1:

Attached Image


EDIT: Ugh, that'll teach me to do color composites on a laptop screen... Image replaced with an improved version. I didn't want to use CB2 as full resolution luminance as the storm contrast is quite different from the visible channels, especially in the tail. Too bad it wasn't the GRN that was full res.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

9 Pages V   1 2 3 > » 
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 29th November 2014 - 05:05 AM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.