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Stardust-NExT, Revisiting Tempel 1
MizarKey
post Feb 21 2011, 12:20 AM
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QUOTE (Juramike @ Feb 17 2011, 10:07 PM) *
Animated sequence from just before C/A to about 2500 km out. Individual images have been rotated and registered to minimize rotation:

Full-res here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/31678681@N07/5454806379/

(I needed to register the images for an outreach talk at a local museum: I'm working on a shorter animated GIF of the departure sequence.)


Wow, that's sweet. Reminds me of the encounter with Mathilde. Thanks for the animation.


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machi
post Feb 21 2011, 11:54 AM
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QUOTE (Juramike @ Feb 20 2011, 03:16 AM) *
The full animation sequence is now up on Planetary Photojournal: PIA13867

I've finished the two animated sequence I was going after, they are on my flickr page if anyone is interested:
Back and forth rock sequence nearest C/A
Departure sequence (13 frames selected)


I think, that your, Emily's and Ian's versions are actually better than the official one.


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machi
post Feb 23 2011, 07:59 PM
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I looked at best image of the comet Tempel 1 with jets and I tried some basic comparison with old Deep Impact's images.
Notable change is missing massive jet, which is visible on the left in Deep Impact images.
Another thing is, that Stardust's images are in fact better in terms of resolution of jets, because in better (with higher resolution) images from Deep Impact
jets were drowned out by Impactor's explosion.
Attached thumbnail(s)
Attached Image
 


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stevesliva
post Mar 16 2011, 09:15 PM
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http://stardustnext.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/m...tatus11_q1.html

Stardust: I'm not dead yet.

QUOTE
March 16, 2011
The spacecraft continues its post-encounter cruise. All subsystems continue to operate as expected. The team is preparing for the decommissioning maneuver, and the decommissioning plan has been prepared and reviewed. The primary date for the decommissioning activity is March 24, with a back-up opportunity on April 7. The Decommissioning Review has been scheduled for March 18 at JPL.


Decom "maneuver" makes me wonder if they're planning a burn to depletion to see what propellant they had left.
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toddbronco2
post Mar 17 2011, 03:18 PM
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I asked the Project Manager, Tim Larson, precisely that question back before the Tempel 1 flyby and he indicated that indeed, a burn to depletion is planned in the decommissioning. Such a maneuver provides a valuable opportunity to test the precision of several methods of modeling the remaining fuel onboard and that validation can benefit other JPL and NASA missions.
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djellison
post Mar 23 2011, 11:53 PM
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Time to say goodbye.

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2011-094

Tomorrow night, PDT.
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tedstryk
post Mar 24 2011, 12:14 AM
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Someone needs to update the blurb at the end.


QUOTE
Stardust-NExT is a low-cost mission that will expand the investigation of comet Tempel 1 initiated by NASA's Deep Impact spacecraft. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages Stardust-NExT for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. Joe Veverka of Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y., is the mission's principal investigator. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, built the spacecraft and manages day-to-day mission operations.


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djellison
post Mar 24 2011, 01:24 AM
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The boilerplate press blurb is on overtime as well I think smile.gif
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Poolio
post Mar 24 2011, 12:18 PM
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QUOTE (tedstryk @ Mar 23 2011, 08:14 PM) *
Someone needs to update the blurb at the end.

Looks like someone did. Future verb tense has been replaced with the infinitive.

Nice way to end a mission. It doesn't mention it in the article, but is the burn designed to send the craft in any particular direction, e.g., a long slow spiral into the sun? It mentions that the post-burn trajectory is somewhat unknown (contingent on the length of the burn), and the projection itself would seem to suggest that there is some interest in getting it out of our neighborhood.
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Phil Stooke
post Mar 24 2011, 12:53 PM
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In orbital dynamics there's no such thing as a 'long slow spiral into the sun'. You make a change in velocity with the rocket burn, that defines a new orbit, and you stay in that orbit forever unless something else disturbs you (like a planetary flyby). The main concern here was that the orbit would not impact Mars or Earth. The small and unpredictable thrust most likely made only a small difference to the orbit anyway.

Phil


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Poolio
post Mar 24 2011, 02:46 PM
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Thanks for straightening me out, Phil. I probably should have known this; I've read enough that I should understand by now how it works, but my Earth-bound mind insists on thinking in terms of friction and drag and loss of momentum.
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stevesliva
post Mar 24 2011, 04:42 PM
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There was some new info on the status page... they actually decided to hurry things up a few days ago.

QUOTE
March 18, 2011
The spacecraft continues its post-encounter cruise. The decommissioning review was held on March 18, with the board recommending six actions to be addressed prior to the planned April 7 decommissioning activity. However, a 2 psi pressure drop was observed in the fuel tank over the weekend, leading the propulsion experts to believe that a gas bubble has made its way into the propellant management device, implying the tank might be getting to the end of the propellant. This prompted the team to reconsider the planned date for the decommissioning. With the consent of senior management and NASA HQ, the decommissioning burn will be executed on March 24. This will help the team determine how much fuel is actually left in the tank, providing data that will be valuable to other missions nearing the end of their fuel supply. After this activity, the spacecraft will be commanded into safe mode with the transmitter off. This will mark the end of a wonderful 12 year mission for the Stardust spacecraft. During that time it has flown by an asteroid and two comets, and returned samples of comet dust to earth for detailed study.
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nprev
post Mar 25 2011, 12:21 AM
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QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Mar 24 2011, 04:53 AM) *
The main concern here was that the orbit would not impact Mars or Earth.


If a controllable (key word) impact with Earth were feasible, I'd actually consider that a useful EOL maneuver. Not only would the spacecraft be decisively desposed of, but if done in a widely observable (but safe) way it would be a nice outreach opportunity...an artificial bolide.

Perhaps this will be practical for some future mission.


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monty python
post Mar 25 2011, 06:34 AM
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Mission complete. The engine burned for 146 seconds.

Goodbye old friend.
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ugordan
post Nov 3 2011, 06:39 PM
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Just a heads-up that the Tempel 1 flyby data is now available at the PDS Small Bodies Node.
One takeaway image, before closest approach:
Attached Image


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