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Rev 152 - Aug 12-Sep 3, 2011 - Hyperion
Phil Stooke
post Aug 26 2011, 08:51 PM
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Yes, the 'basin at the top' is Helios.

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Phil


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S_Walker
post Aug 26 2011, 09:02 PM
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Here's a quick composite using the R,G, and B images, warped to approximately match each other. Color is a rough guestimate, because the exposures weren't consistent.
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MarcF
post Aug 26 2011, 09:31 PM
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Thanks Phil. I like so much studying the maps of Solar System planets and moons. I could stay hours in front of a map. I think it's time to get an improved map of Hyperion. And I'm looking forward to learn all the future names of surface features. I just hope they will be easier to remember than those on Rhea smile.gif !
Nice composite Sean. What a fascinating world !
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Juramike
post Aug 27 2011, 01:44 AM
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WAC color composite of Hyperion from 27,000 km away. I really like this shot.

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So lonely.....


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Decepticon
post Aug 27 2011, 03:40 AM
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Im not convinced thats a crater.

To me it looks like it feel in on itself. unsure.gif
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ugordan
post Aug 27 2011, 03:41 PM
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Hyperion in natural color and a comparison shot from the previous close flyby:

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floron
post Aug 29 2011, 12:07 AM
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QUOTE (elakdawalla @ Aug 26 2011, 12:16 PM) *
Hyperion crescent. Unfortunate that the "nose" got cut off in the NACs.


I know that this may be anathema to some people, but I took the liberty of painting the nose back in.

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Ian R
post Aug 31 2011, 08:37 AM
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Hi everyone,

I know I'm a little late to the party, but here's my attempt to animate the Hyperion flyby, resulting from judicious usage of some tweening and deshaking filters:

http://youtu.be/ARyY7BJhzhs?hd=1

The colour is false, but still pretty effective, nonetheless.


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Floyd
post Aug 31 2011, 10:57 AM
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Thanks Ian--Great animation.


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Juramike
post Aug 31 2011, 01:24 PM
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WOW! Beautiful work!


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machi
post Sep 1 2011, 09:44 PM
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"The colour is false, but still pretty effective, nonetheless."

Nice animation and color looks very natural.


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jasedm
post Sep 3 2011, 06:42 PM
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QUOTE (Decepticon @ Aug 27 2011, 04:40 AM) *
Im not convinced thats a crater.

To me it looks like it feel in on itself. unsure.gif


I agree - looks like a collapse. Hyperion's half empty by density, so it's perhaps not beyond the bounds of possibility.
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Phil Stooke
post Sep 3 2011, 06:56 PM
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To me, a classic impact crater with a central peak. Why would a collapse be so circular and have a central peak?

http://planetimages.blogspot.com/2005/09/v...s-hyperion.html

Phil


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jasedm
post Sep 3 2011, 08:37 PM
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I'm no planetary geologist (as I'm sure you'll shortly discover wink.gif ) and I defer to your much greater experience on this Phil, it just appears to me to be very different to most impact craters, I'll try to explain why:

1) The dark lag deposits in the smaller craters appear evenly distributed both inside and outside the depression, and the surface appears visually very similar in age interior and exterior (similar crater sizes, and distribution).
2) The scarps are relatively bright, and fresher-looking than anywhere else on Hyperion
3) Some of the craters actually on or adjacent to the depression scarp look as if they've 'stretched' following slumping
4) The scarp is non-concentric, and in places non-existent
5) The rim is very subdued

As to the central mound, I have a wacky theory that I won't embarrass myself by airing just at the minute.....

On balance, Occam's razor no doubt applies here.

Jase
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ngunn
post Sep 3 2011, 08:43 PM
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Maybe there is a middle way. I can imagine that an impact into a very porous object might produce a crater, with characterisic features such as a central peak, that would nevertheless be more than usually sunken in. This might happen if the impact shattered an open structure and collapsed all the voids within. Don't ask me to 'produce' such a porous object. I don't know how to do it. But Hyperion is so peculiar that I'm prepared to entertain strange ideas.

Another thought about central peaks. I've always assumed they were produced by outward blasted material 'sloshing' inward after an impact, but I'm not sure this works in low g environments like Hyperion (and Vesta S).
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