IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

9 Pages V  « < 3 4 5 6 7 > »   
Reply to this topicStart new topic
HAMO, (aka High Altitude Mapping Orbit)
ilbasso
post Sep 29 2011, 10:02 PM
Post #61


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 752
Joined: 23-October 04
From: Greensboro, NC USA
Member No.: 103



My total ignorance of geology is showing, but I could imagine a scenario in which the southern basin impact partially melted the entire surface of Vesta, with the asteroid "ringing" seismically for a while afterward. The concentric grooves in Phil's polar projection remind me of waves that froze as the surface cools.

Again, I am not a geologist...just relaying the impression that I get from that projection.


--------------------
Jonathan Ward
Manning the LCC at http://www.apollolaunchcontrol.com
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
SolarSystemRubbl...
post Sep 30 2011, 12:10 AM
Post #62


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 30
Joined: 5-September 07
From: High Bridge, New Jersey, USA
Member No.: 3669



Yes, here's the latest Dawn journal:

http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/journal_09_27_11.asp
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Gsnorgathon
post Sep 30 2011, 04:08 PM
Post #63


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 249
Joined: 23-January 05
From: Seattle, WA
Member No.: 156



QUOTE (ilbasso @ Sep 29 2011, 02:02 PM) *
My total ignorance of geology is showing, but I could imagine a scenario in which the southern basin impact partially melted the entire surface of Vesta...
(snip)

Two things: 1) a good deal of the ejecta from the impact might have been molten, so you wouldn't need to melt the whole surface. Just melt some of it and then spray it all over the place. 2) You don't necessarily need anything molten. Seismic shaking from an impact that large on a body that small would be huge. Get some nice resonances going, pile a bunch of fresh ejecta on it, and poof! Troughs and ridges. Sound waves frozen in stone.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
machi
post Sep 30 2011, 04:23 PM
Post #64


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 636
Joined: 27-February 08
From: Heart of Europe
Member No.: 4057



Two new stereoscopic images from my blog:
South polar mountain - crosseye pair, anaglyph and blog entry.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
dilo
post Oct 1 2011, 12:57 PM
Post #65


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2492
Joined: 15-January 05
From: center Italy
Member No.: 150



QUOTE (machi @ Sep 30 2011, 04:23 PM) *
Two new stereoscopic images from my blog:

Beautiful!


--------------------
I always think before posting! - Marco -
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
antipode
post Oct 1 2011, 01:06 PM
Post #66


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 151
Joined: 1-October 06
Member No.: 1206



Wow, what an extraordinary structure that has turned out to be!

P
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Hungry4info
post Oct 2 2011, 12:47 AM
Post #67


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1013
Joined: 26-July 08
Member No.: 4270



Is this the first image from HAMO?
Looks splendid either way!


--------------------
-- Hungry4info (Sirius_Alpha)
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
volcanopele
post Oct 2 2011, 01:48 AM
Post #68


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 2860
Joined: 11-February 04
From: Tucson, AZ
Member No.: 23



This image was released yesterday:

http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/dawn_v...pping_orbit.asp

It has a slightly lower pixel scale at 65 meters per pixel.


--------------------
&@^^!% Jim! I'm a geologist, not a physicist!
The Gish Bar Times - A Blog all about Jupiter's Moon Io
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
dilo
post Oct 2 2011, 06:53 AM
Post #69


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2492
Joined: 15-January 05
From: center Italy
Member No.: 150



Indeed, while yesterday's published image was snapped on Sept,17 from 750km height (based on resolution and according to simulator data), the Volcanopele highlighted one was probably taken the following day, when Dawn reached nominal HAMO height, slightly below 700 km.


--------------------
I always think before posting! - Marco -
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
dilo
post Oct 3 2011, 01:47 PM
Post #70


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2492
Joined: 15-January 05
From: center Italy
Member No.: 150



One question: do someone knows updated Vesta size after Dawn exploration?
I guess even preliminary estimates are a lot better than Hubble-based figures but, strangely, I cannot find anything else! (obviously, I am referring to average ellipsoidal 3 axes value)


--------------------
I always think before posting! - Marco -
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
belleraphon1
post Oct 3 2011, 04:09 PM
Post #71


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 724
Joined: 29-December 05
From: NE Oh, USA
Member No.: 627



From the EPSC-DPS Joint Meeting 2011 ..
Media release
Dawn at Vesta: Massive mountains, rough surface, and old-young dichotomy in hemispheres
http://www.europlanet-eu.org/outreach/inde...2&Itemid=41


"NASA’s Dawn mission, which has been orbiting Vesta since mid-July, has revealed that the asteroid’s southern hemisphere boasts one of the largest mountains in the Solar System. Other results show that Vesta’s surface, viewed at different wavelengths, has striking diversity in its composition particularly around craters. The surface appears to be much rougher than most asteroids in the main asteroid belt. Preliminary results from crater age dates indicate that areas in the southern hemisphere are as young as 1-2 billion years old, much younger than areas in the north. The findings are being presented today at the EPSC-DPS Joint Meeting 2011 in Nantes, France"

This brieifing was webcast live at 6:15am Eastern U.S. and I missed the first 30 minutes.

Good stuff!

Craig
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
volcanopele
post Oct 3 2011, 04:59 PM
Post #72


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 2860
Joined: 11-February 04
From: Tucson, AZ
Member No.: 23



As mentioned in the press release, several names have been approved by the IAU for features that provide the names for mapping quadrants on Vesta. Here is a map identifying those craters (and one hill) :
Attached Image


--------------------
&@^^!% Jim! I'm a geologist, not a physicist!
The Gish Bar Times - A Blog all about Jupiter's Moon Io
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ElkGroveDan
post Oct 3 2011, 05:10 PM
Post #73


Senior Member
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 4657
Joined: 15-March 05
From: Sloughhouse, CA
Member No.: 197



QUOTE (dilo @ Oct 3 2011, 06:47 AM) *
One question: do someone knows updated Vesta size after Dawn exploration?

As always, Emily has the answer:

http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00003207/


--------------------
If Occam had heard my theory, things would be very different now.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Oct 3 2011, 06:16 PM
Post #74


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5631
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



... or part of the answer. She doesn't give the three axes.

Phil



--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
dilo
post Oct 3 2011, 08:55 PM
Post #75


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2492
Joined: 15-January 05
From: center Italy
Member No.: 150



Thanks for highlight, ElkGroveDan! And perfect timing, Emily!
Obviously, in the report volume exponent is missed (should be 7,532E+7 cubic km); average radius uncertain should be 850 m.


--------------------
I always think before posting! - Marco -
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

9 Pages V  « < 3 4 5 6 7 > » 
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 2nd September 2014 - 11:52 PM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.