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Cape York - Shoemaker Ridge and the NE traverse, Starting sol 2735
Stu
post Oct 11 2011, 08:17 PM
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QUOTE (stevesliva @ Oct 11 2011, 09:00 PM) *
Are those clouds? I know the vertical stuff is dust, but there's a horizontal banding in there. Just fill?


Lot of fill at the top, well spotted. Just look at the rocky stuff. wink.gif


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fredk
post Oct 11 2011, 08:22 PM
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No time to check, but it looks like we've driven up to the lineations, and they're visible clearly in the navcams now:
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportuni...0M1.JPG?sol2742
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Stu
post Oct 11 2011, 08:24 PM
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Oooooohhhh.... biggrin.gif

Attached Image


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Stu
post Oct 11 2011, 09:11 PM
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Just to give a sense of scale of these features, here's a cloned Oppy shown next to them ...

Attached Image




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jamescanvin
post Oct 11 2011, 09:42 PM
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My version of the Kirkland Lake mosaic:



That is some impressive rock pile! smile.gif

James


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ngunn
post Oct 11 2011, 09:59 PM
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[quote name='fredk' date='Oct 11 2011, 09:22 PM' post='179180']
"we've driven up to the lineations, and they're visible clearly in the navcams now"

Where are they in that image then? Can you point them out? Sorry not to have done my homework.
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mhoward
post Oct 11 2011, 11:09 PM
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Sol 2742 Navcam 360x80 left right anaglyph
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mhoward
post Oct 11 2011, 11:16 PM
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Because this area might just be of particular interest, here's a QuickTime VR of the Navcam panorama anaglyph (Sol 2742) (7.4 MB)

Edit: Worth noting: when you first open this, the view is pointing North. And the big inadvertent seam marks South.
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Bill Harris
post Oct 11 2011, 11:23 PM
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New enhanced crop of HiRISE image ESP_024015_1775 of the area surrounding the lineations:

http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r91/wil...ecular_city.png

--Bill


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fredk
post Oct 12 2011, 12:19 AM
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QUOTE (fredk @ Oct 11 2011, 08:22 PM) *
No time to check, but it looks like we've driven up to the lineations
I should've checked - we're still a ways short of the main lineations. Here's my best guess of the 2742 location - we appear to be sitting on the edge of a small depression/crater:
Attached Image

To my eye, the bright features in the middle of the navcam I posted look quite linear, but they're clearly much too close to be the main "tardis" features. The "tardis" features should be in this frame, roughly where I've circled:
Attached Image

Those nearby features may still be related lineations, just too small to see clearly on the hirise view.
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Jam Butty
post Oct 12 2011, 03:08 AM
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The 'back' of Stoughton,
Pancam sol 2736, L257 R2-1,
Colour flicker gif with a synthesized right green channel (a la mhoward).

Attached Image
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mhoward
post Oct 12 2011, 03:11 AM
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QUOTE (Jam Butty @ Oct 11 2011, 08:08 PM) *
Colour flicker gif with a synthesized right green channel


Nice!
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CosmicRocker
post Oct 12 2011, 04:05 AM
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QUOTE (jamescanvin @ Oct 11 2011, 03:42 PM) *
That is some impressive rock pile! ...

omg, that is sweet. smile.gif I love this outcrop.


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CosmicRocker
post Oct 12 2011, 04:57 AM
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This is some of the most amazing imagery we have ever seen of such ancient rocks.


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Bill Harris
post Oct 12 2011, 12:15 PM
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The lineations are indeed not readily visible from ground level. The sparse detritus overlying them "shields" the view at low viewing angles from the ground and blocks less in the "vertical" view of aerials. And they are undoubtedly mineralized joints or fractures, a form of low-temperature hydrothermal activity (a new word to bandy about). Probably created as stress-relief features from the unloading of the surface as the Endeavour rim has eroded (see them all the time in Appalachia) but they may also be related to shock from the concussion of the Endeavour impact (or earlier impacts). They are probably quite common here, but typically are less-visible and covered with the detritus of weathered material whereas at the spot the loose stuff has evidently been transported away. Notice that the Rover tracks sometimes disappear without an obvious change in the albedo or texture of the surface, so there is something different happening here.

Remember that we got a "preview" of lineations when we first arrived at CY and rushed by those fine, reddish lineations on the way to Odyssey. At any rate, the mineralogy of these structures will give great insight into conditions of the time. And a prequel of what cousin Curiosity ought to be looking at in Gale crater.

--Bill



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