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LAMO, aka Low Altitude Mapping Orbit
Gsnorgathon
post Mar 1 2012, 02:23 AM
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Umm... how about Lucaria Tholus? OK, yeah. That's what I thought. But according to the planetary names folks, they are playing by the rules: Tholus, tholi (TH) - Small domical mountain or hill. Maybe they need a new feature name. What's Latin for "bump"?
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pablogm1024
post Mar 2 2012, 10:10 AM
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QUOTE (Gsnorgathon @ Mar 1 2012, 03:23 AM) *
...But according to the planetary names folks, they are playing by the rules: Tholus, tholi (TH) - Small domical mountain or hill...

Early on in the Vesta orbital phase, the Framing Camera operations team, far more concerned about correct orientation of the images and meaningful navigation than about scientific or toponymic soundness, concocted a series of informal names that mainly served the purpose of designating easily identifiable features. One of these nicknames was "The Snowman", which has now become part of the popular culture about Vesta. Another one was "Dark Volcano".
Cheers.


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Phil Stooke
post Mar 2 2012, 02:25 PM
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"tholus" on other bodies has typically been used to denote what appears to be a volcanic construct


True! But these names are supposed to be purely descriptive, not carrying any genetic implications. I agree the term is mainly used for smaller volcanic hills, but it doesn't have to be. Possible counter-example: Scandia Tholi, Mars, a rag-tag collection of hills that don't look like volcanic shields or cones to me.


Also - new names added on Tuesday:

http://planetarynames.wr.usgs.gov/images/vesta.pdf


Phil


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Astro0
post Apr 19 2012, 05:05 AM
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40 extra days at Vesta! smile.gif
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2012-107
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Phil Stooke
post Apr 19 2012, 12:03 PM
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Yes, and they have now released over 200 pictures of the day.

Phil



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charborob
post Apr 19 2012, 12:14 PM
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In LAMO, Dawn seems to be taking only nadir-pointing images. At least, those that were published are of this type, unless I missed something. Do they sometimes slew the spacecraft in order to take oblique images?
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Phil Stooke
post Apr 19 2012, 05:03 PM
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LAMO is all about the composition-mapping instrument, with imaging just riding along. They have to look down pretty much all the time, I think.

Phil



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pablogm1024
post Apr 21 2012, 03:16 PM
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QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Apr 19 2012, 05:03 PM) *
LAMO is all about the composition-mapping instrument, with imaging just riding along. They have to look down pretty much all the time, I think.

I can confirm Phil's comment. As Marc Rayman has mentioned several times on his blog, the Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector (GRaND) is the prime instrument in this phase. This instrument will provide the elemental composition of the surface (up to 1 meter depth) thanks to the nuclear emissions induced by the background cosmic radiation. The problem is that these emissions are very weak, and even with a detector as finely tuned as GRaND it requires an extremely large amount of integration time to get above the noise.
The off-nadir imaging, which is critical for the stereographic reconstruction of the surface, will continue in the second HAMO phase later this year.
Regards,
pablogm


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Juramike
post Apr 25 2012, 06:59 PM
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A really nice "uber"-image release today, with lots of neat related image and caption releases:

http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/feature_stories/a...ts_revealed.asp

A gorgeous shot of Aquilia: http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/aquilia_area_color.asp

Vibidia Crater: http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/vibidia_crater_color.asp
(obviously the result from a Pocket Tanks Chaos Grenade)


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Some higher resolution images available at my photostream: http://www.flickr.com/photos/31678681@N07/
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Hungry4info
post May 7 2012, 07:58 PM
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NASA to Hold News Conference on Asteroid Mission Results


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Mariner9
post May 8 2012, 05:11 PM
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I suspect that the news conference is timed to coincide with DAWN results being printed in this week's upcoming issue of Science. I went to the lecture at Caltech last week and Carol Raymond mentioned the publication, and artfully dodged at least one question from the audience that apparently would have prematurely revealed something that will be included in the articles.

I have been collecting the "special issues" of Science on the planetary missions for the last 20 years. The articles are a bit of a tough read compared to something more mainstream like Scientific American, but it just makes me feel a bit closer to the real discovery process.

For anyone not aware of it, you can locate back issues at http://www.sciencemag.org/content/by/year.
And, after a lot of searching, you can find how to order issues at: http://www.sciencemag.org/site/help/readers/order.xhtml

For some reason I have had mixed sucess with the online forms, sometimes I get acess and can do it online, and sometimes end up with a hard copy PDF file instead. When that happens I just call the toll free number and do it the old fashion "talk to someone" way.
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Holder of the Tw...
post May 10 2012, 04:42 PM
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News conference set to start in one hour twenty minutes from this posting.

NASA TV Link
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Floyd
post May 10 2012, 05:58 PM
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About to start, 98+ viewers


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Explorer1
post May 10 2012, 06:00 PM
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Starting now...
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Paolo
post May 10 2012, 06:05 PM
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meanwhile, papers have appeared in Science http://www.sciencemag.org/content/336/6082.toc (behind the paywall)


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I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

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