IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

6 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 5 > »   
Reply to this topicStart new topic
InSight mission
SFJCody
post Aug 21 2012, 05:25 AM
Post #31


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 771
Joined: 8-February 04
From: Arabia Terra
Member No.: 12



Does seem like a shame that only one copy of this spacecraft will fit into the Discovery cost envelope. A seismometer network would provide some very interesting data.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Toma B
post Aug 21 2012, 07:37 AM
Post #32


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 617
Joined: 9-May 05
From: Subotica
Member No.: 384



From Bruce Betts blog on PS...
QUOTE
The lander will have black and white cameras on the robotic arm, one similar to the Navcam on the Mars Exploration Rovers and one similar to their Hazcams. They will be used for context and directing the placement of the seismic and heat flow instruments.


Yeah...those would be some exciting images to show to the press on their first and only press conference. How do they mean to keep the public interest, if the can't snap at least one 360 degrees, Full Color Hi-resolution panorama of landing site.
Maybe this is not final spacecraft design yet? Maybe there is some place for one of these beauties or that Planetary Society's Mars Microphone.

and BTW. Is there a word about where it should be landing?


--------------------
The scientist does not study nature because it is useful; he studies it because he delights in it, and he delights in it because it is beautiful.
Jules H. Poincare

My "Astrophotos" gallery on flickr...
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
monty python
post Aug 21 2012, 08:05 AM
Post #33


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 115
Joined: 2-March 06
Member No.: 692




and BTW. Is there a word about where it should be landing?
[/quote]

This is a good question. Do you aim at an average safe area of mars, or go for tharsis looking for heat from the interior and quakes?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Gsnorgathon
post Aug 21 2012, 08:11 AM
Post #34


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 247
Joined: 23-January 05
From: Seattle, WA
Member No.: 156



Given the high elevation at Tharsis, I'd guess you don't go there, especially if you're using Phoenix heritage equipment. That's what the illustration suggests.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Explorer1
post Aug 21 2012, 08:23 AM
Post #35


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 854
Joined: 13-February 10
From: British Columbia
Member No.: 5221



Maybe Elysium instead? Oh, what I'd give to finally see a martian volcano from the surface, no matter how distant....

And yes, a color camera should get some serious consideration. I mean Phoenix had one, so why downgrade?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
antipode
post Aug 21 2012, 10:09 AM
Post #36


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 146
Joined: 1-October 06
Member No.: 1206



I was thinking Elysium as well, but Elysium PLANITIA ph34r.gif

I think they are going to go for a nice flat and featureless site (sight?).

They are taking a Phoenix weather package with them I believe, including that telltale that was sich a cute feature of that mission.

P
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
MahFL
post Aug 21 2012, 10:37 AM
Post #37


Forum Contributor
***

Group: Members
Posts: 942
Joined: 8-February 04
From: North East Florida, USA.
Member No.: 11



Forget pretty pics, the science is literally underground.

QUOTE (antipode @ Aug 21 2012, 10:09 AM) *
They are taking a Phoenix weather package with them I believe, including that telltale that was sich a cute feature of that mission.

P

You sure about that, no mention of that on the website.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Drkskywxlt
post Aug 21 2012, 10:56 AM
Post #38


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 287
Joined: 29-August 06
From: Columbia, MD
Member No.: 1083



QUOTE (antipode @ Aug 21 2012, 06:09 AM) *
They are taking a Phoenix weather package with them I believe,


Don't think so.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
gndonald
post Aug 21 2012, 10:57 AM
Post #39


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 206
Joined: 19-July 05
Member No.: 442



QUOTE (SFJCody @ Aug 21 2012, 01:25 PM) *
Does seem like a shame that only one copy of this spacecraft will fit into the Discovery cost envelope. A seismometer network would provide some very interesting data.


I agree, three landings would give them the chance to use earthquakes & impacts to probe the interior of Mars in the same way Apollo allowed us to determine what was underneath the surface of the Moon.

As to the suggestion that they fit something like the weather mast used on Phoenix, they'd also need a camera to monitor it.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
MahFL
post Aug 21 2012, 11:34 AM
Post #40


Forum Contributor
***

Group: Members
Posts: 942
Joined: 8-February 04
From: North East Florida, USA.
Member No.: 11



QUOTE (gndonald @ Aug 21 2012, 11:57 AM) *
I agree, three landings would give them the chance to use earthquakes & impacts to probe the interior of Mars in the same way Apollo allowed us to determine what was underneath the surface of the Moon.

As to the suggestion that they fit something like the weather mast used on Phoenix, they'd also need a camera to monitor it.


New techniques don't require 3 landers, they can do the science with one, thats why they have been given the go ahead for the mission.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
cIclops
post Aug 21 2012, 11:35 AM
Post #41


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 122
Joined: 29-January 05
Member No.: 161



Good news from NASA's Mars program at last!

InSight mission page

Launch March 8 - March 27, 2016

Seismic package, 5m deep drill, and two cameras!


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
pospa
post Aug 21 2012, 11:55 AM
Post #42


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 138
Joined: 4-May 11
From: Pardubice, CZ
Member No.: 5979



QUOTE (cIclops @ Aug 21 2012, 01:35 PM) *
Seismic package, 5m deep drill, and two cameras!

Just a little note: HP3 instrument doesn't have a drill, but so-called electromechanical mole which penetrates through the soil via hammering mechanism.
For more see http://www.dlr.de/irs/en/desktopdefault.as...970_read-25032/
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
centsworth_II
post Aug 21 2012, 12:19 PM
Post #43


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2024
Joined: 28-December 04
Member No.: 132



I don't know if there are other candidates.
Attached Image

http://www.uahirise.org/hiwish/view/69980
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Aug 21 2012, 03:00 PM
Post #44


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5325
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



There was a poster on the landing site at LPSC in March. I spoke to Bruce about it at the time.

The site has to be low elevation for EDL and near the equator for good solar power throughout the mission. Matt Golombek and colleagues identified suitable areas in Valles Marineris, the southern Chryse channel areas (well south of Chryse itself), Isidis and Elysium Planitia. Only the last area worked well for their needs, especially latitude. They identified about a dozen ellipses and chose one at the centre of the area as a starting point for the proposal. Now they will do a detailed analysis with HiRISE to pick the best one. One drawback - it's not far from Gale and may have some communication overlap issues (Gale itself was chosen partly to avoid that overlap with Opportunity, as all other MSL sites were near Opportunity's longitude). But that can be dealt with.

And about cameras - I think they plan to use off the shelf spares of MER Hazcam and Navcam to save money. So changes are out unless you fancy doing a Kickstarter for them. And the cameras are only needed for characterization and documentation for instrument deployment - nice flat area for the seismometer and a suitable spot for the drill. After that they will collect a full panorama for outreach and site context, but then (after about 60 days) they are shut off to save money - allowing a smaller team to simply monitor the other data rather than construct data collection sequences all the time. Everything is going to be about keeping costs down.


Phil


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Drkskywxlt
post Aug 21 2012, 03:11 PM
Post #45


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 287
Joined: 29-August 06
From: Columbia, MD
Member No.: 1083



QUOTE (cIclops @ Aug 21 2012, 06:35 AM) *


I've seen similar comments swirling around (even by the NASA Administrator), but this is a Discovery mission, NOT part of NASA's separate Mars program. NASA's planetary science division is currently broken down in the following budgetary and organizational lines: Lunar Quest, Mars, Discovery, New Frontiers, Outer Planets, Technology, Research.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

6 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 5 > » 
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 23rd April 2014 - 08:32 AM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.