IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

4 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 >  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Rev 148 - Apr 29-May 30, 2011 - Titan T76
kyokugaisha
post May 23 2011, 10:41 PM
Post #31


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 12
Joined: 3-April 10
From: Kent, UK
Member No.: 5306



And the same for N00171680 using N00171680/79/78.

Attached Image


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ngunn
post May 23 2011, 10:58 PM
Post #32


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 3114
Joined: 4-November 05
From: North Wales
Member No.: 542



What an entrance - those are really good. Thanks!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
kyokugaisha
post May 23 2011, 11:10 PM
Post #33


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 12
Joined: 3-April 10
From: Kent, UK
Member No.: 5306



No probs! Everyone is normally so quick on here.

Here is the last one using N00171692/1/0 over N00171689. This was a bit harder as I've tried to keep Saturn's unlit side in the background thus leaving some compression artifacts.

Attached Image


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ngunn
post May 23 2011, 11:16 PM
Post #34


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 3114
Joined: 4-November 05
From: North Wales
Member No.: 542



Brilliant again! A good call keeping Saturn visible - I really like what you're doing. You'll have more fans in the morning.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
machi
post May 24 2011, 12:44 AM
Post #35


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 636
Joined: 27-February 08
From: Heart of Europe
Member No.: 4057



Very nice kodak moments and beautiful processed images rolleyes.gif .
But I think, that famous image with Enceladus' geysers, Titan and rings is still unbeaten cool.gif .


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
elakdawalla
post May 24 2011, 03:15 AM
Post #36


Bloggette par Excellence
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 4415
Joined: 4-August 05
From: Pasadena, CA, USA, Earth
Member No.: 454



Speaking of which, that data is now public (part of the last PDS release) and is much better in that format than the raw JPEG format, but no one has yet stepped forward to redo that awesome group effort version of the image....


--------------------
My blog - @elakdawalla on Twitter - Please support unmannedspaceflight.com by donating here.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
S_Walker
post May 24 2011, 12:16 PM
Post #37


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 92
Joined: 15-October 09
Member No.: 4979



My attempt at Tethys, Titan, and ring-lit Saturn.
Attached Image
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
elakdawalla
post May 24 2011, 07:49 PM
Post #38


Bloggette par Excellence
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 4415
Joined: 4-August 05
From: Pasadena, CA, USA, Earth
Member No.: 454



Moved several posts discussing the use of IMG2PNG to convert/calibrate Cassini images into the appropriate thread.


--------------------
My blog - @elakdawalla on Twitter - Please support unmannedspaceflight.com by donating here.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Ian R
post May 27 2011, 11:52 AM
Post #39


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 552
Joined: 18-July 05
From: Plymouth, UK
Member No.: 437



My attempt at producing a stacked, up-sampled, Titan-only and colour-corrected composite:

Attached Image


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
john_s
post May 27 2011, 09:20 PM
Post #40


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 530
Joined: 3-December 04
From: Boulder, Colorado, USA
Member No.: 117



Gorgeous images! It seems kinda churlish to point out that they are all are upside down, with north at the bottom...

John
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
S_Walker
post May 27 2011, 10:01 PM
Post #41


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 92
Joined: 15-October 09
Member No.: 4979



QUOTE (john_s @ May 27 2011, 05:20 PM) *
Gorgeous images! It seems kinda churlish to point out that they are all are upside down, with north at the bottom...

John


It's customary for planetary imagers to depict images south up because until the mid-70's, everyone observing the planets used newtonian reflectors.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ugordan
post May 27 2011, 10:22 PM
Post #42


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 3563
Joined: 1-October 05
From: Croatia
Member No.: 523



Then the next logical question comes to mind - why haven't we been doing that for the first 4 years of Cassini's mission...


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
john_s
post May 27 2011, 11:56 PM
Post #43


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 530
Joined: 3-December 04
From: Boulder, Colorado, USA
Member No.: 117



For those who aren't familiar with the conventions, amateur astronomers often display telescopic planetary images with south at the top, to approximate the view through the eyepiece of many telescopes (for observers in the Earth's northern hemisphere). Professional astronomers, and planetary scientists (professional and amateur) working with spacecraft images, usually put north at the top unless there's a good reason not to do so. Personally, I'd like to see the amateur astronomers change their convention, in this digital age, so we can all look at the solar system the same way...

John
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Ian R
post May 30 2011, 11:09 AM
Post #44


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 552
Joined: 18-July 05
From: Plymouth, UK
Member No.: 437



Here's a (north up) version, with Dione just peeking out behind Titan:

Attached Image


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
stevesliva
post May 31 2011, 02:34 AM
Post #45


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1164
Joined: 14-October 05
From: Seattle
Member No.: 530



QUOTE (john_s @ May 27 2011, 07:56 PM) *
For those who aren't familiar with the conventions, amateur astronomers often display telescopic planetary images with south at the top, to approximate the view through the eyepiece of many telescopes (for observers in the Earth's northern hemisphere). Professional astronomers, and planetary scientists (professional and amateur) working with spacecraft images, usually put north at the top unless there's a good reason not to do so.


I'd wondered why that was, when the storm on Saturn and the impact on Jupiter made it apparent. Makes sense. Maybe we'll use the metric system and the British will drive on the correct side of the road soon, too.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

4 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 >
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 3rd September 2014 - 04:41 AM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.