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Rev 125 - Jan 19-Feb 4, 2010 - Titan T66, Prometheus
ugordan
post Jan 25 2010, 10:05 PM
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NAC RGB ring scan of the left ring ansa, unlit side, 2010-01-23:



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volcanopele
post Jan 25 2010, 10:29 PM
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Very nice! As if the bright F and C rings and Cassini Division weren't enough of a clue, this observation was taken at high phase over the "unlit" side of the rings. I put unlit in quotes as there is obviously some contribution from Saturn shine as well.


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tharrison
post Jan 26 2010, 01:12 AM
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Wow, very beautiful!


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Juramike
post Jan 26 2010, 01:46 AM
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Image from [EDIT: UN]lit side of rings. Movement of a sheparding moon and ringlet chunks can be seen as multicolored splots in the lower right part of the image:
(processing details on flickr)

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volcanopele
post Jan 26 2010, 01:54 AM
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I think that is still the unlit side I do believe...


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Juramike
post Jan 26 2010, 01:59 AM
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QUOTE (volcanopele @ Jan 25 2010, 08:54 PM) *
I think that is still the unlit side I do believe...


Gaaah! (Corrected)


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remcook
post Jan 26 2010, 08:10 AM
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nice smile.gif The moving parts really jump out in such a composite.
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ugordan
post Jan 28 2010, 01:15 PM
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What the.... ? Does Aegaeon (btw, is it spelled that way or Aegeaon as in Looking Ahead?) really look like a stick or is that motion smear?

http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/imag...7/N00150218.jpg

Sure looks like the former case based on all the raw images. Is this a high phase shot?


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volcanopele
post Jan 28 2010, 03:38 PM
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No it's Aegaeon, I just spelled it wrong... Noticed that last night... laugh.gif unsure.gif rolleyes.gif

The phase angle is around 75 deg.


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ugordan
post Jan 28 2010, 05:55 PM
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At 75 degrees phase angle, did we just discover the most elongated object ever imaged so far?


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elakdawalla
post Jan 28 2010, 05:59 PM
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Here's an animation that runs through 17 of the 18 Aegaeon NAC shots (skipping the second one, in which I just couldn't find it). Flickering is caused by Cassini using different exposures & different filters. It's enlarged 2x.
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Hungry4info
post Jan 28 2010, 06:05 PM
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QUOTE (ugordan @ Jan 28 2010, 11:55 AM) *
did we just discover the most elongated object ever imaged so far?


Wow. I can't think of anything more elongated, but what if this is a saucer shape like Pan or Atlas, being viewed edge-on?

Definitely interesting. Thanks for the animation, Emily.


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volcanopele
post Jan 28 2010, 06:09 PM
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QUOTE (ugordan @ Jan 28 2010, 10:55 AM) *
At 75 degrees phase angle, did we just discover the most elongated object ever imaged so far?

No. It is elongated as it should be in the sub- to anti-Saturn points, but from this phase it is hard to call it "the most elongated object".

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ugordan
post Jan 28 2010, 06:09 PM
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Atlas is definitely thin, but this one appears to outdo it, assuming we didn't by chance get aligned at Aegaeon's equator. Tantalizing. I'd love to see a RGB color composite and compare it to other small rocks, I'd guess this one will turn out to be bluish as well.


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Phil Stooke
post Jan 29 2010, 01:01 AM
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Best I can do with Aegaeon - images from the start and end of the sequence. Each is a composite of about 6 or 7 frames, omitting the invisible or saturated frames, enlarged to 400%.

Phil

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