IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

 
Reply to this topicStart new topic
LPSC 2012
machi
post Feb 2 2012, 11:03 PM
Post #1


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 586
Joined: 27-February 08
From: Heart of Europe
Member No.: 4057



It looks, that LPSC abstracts for this year are now available - LPSC 2012.
As last year, I made two files for downloading abstracts via download manager (I'm using Free Download Manager).
One is for sessions and second one is for automatic download of all pdfs between indexes 1001 and 2999.
Attached File(s)
Attached File  Lpsc2012_1001_2999.txt ( 109.32K ) Number of downloads: 231
Attached File  LpscSessions101_818.txt ( 8.87K ) Number of downloads: 116
 


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Feb 3 2012, 04:49 AM
Post #2


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5318
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



Tons of fantastic stuff!

Phil



--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ngunn
post Feb 7 2012, 10:47 PM
Post #3


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 3069
Joined: 4-November 05
From: North Wales
Member No.: 542



Yes, but nobody's talking about it. I've already posted links to three abstracts on Titan, but from the rest of the solar system there is no comment so far. Am I breaking a taboo? Do we refrain from discussing the abstracts until the conference is held? If so, please tell me and I'll get in line. I was hoping some headlines would be highlighted by our experts on Mars at least.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
machi
post Feb 8 2012, 12:30 AM
Post #4


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 586
Joined: 27-February 08
From: Heart of Europe
Member No.: 4057



"Am I breaking a taboo? Do we refrain from discussing the abstracts until the conference is held?"

I don't think so. I don't know what others are doing, but I'm now busy with my new project and I'm systematically digging in abstracts and papers. wink.gif
But I saw few LPSC abstracts and I have already few favorites. For example abstract 1150 - "A New Look at Cooling Models for Martian Flood Basalt Columns".
Visible (from HiRISE) basalt columns on Mars! That's really something special. Furthermore few hours before I found this abstract, I was watching older R. Attenborough's documentary "Building the Earth" in which I saw amazing scotland's basalt columns! biggrin.gif

Edit: I added direct link to the abstract.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
elakdawalla
post Feb 8 2012, 01:09 AM
Post #5


Bloggette par Excellence
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 4259
Joined: 4-August 05
From: Pasadena, CA, USA, Earth
Member No.: 454



QUOTE (ngunn @ Feb 7 2012, 02:47 PM) *
Am I breaking a taboo? Do we refrain from discussing the abstracts until the conference is held?

This is a good question to ask, but you are not. There's been some controversy in recent years about professional societies attempting to enforce an embargo on abstracts that were freely available online. But that's not how embargoes work. An embargo is part of an agreement between a journalist and somebody with privileged information. If the journalist agrees not to publicize the information until a set date, then the person gives the privileged information to the journalist, under embargo. But you cannot enforce an embargo upon people who have not agreed to these terms. It makes no sense to post material publicly and then tell people they cannot discuss it. Here's a good place to read about the notion of things being "freely available but embargoed." Some scientists may be uncomfortable about these things being discussed because they fear the Ingelfinger rule, but both Science and Nature now have explicit policies stating that discussion of ongoing work at conferences and in abstracts does not constitute prior publication.


--------------------
My blog - @elakdawalla on Twitter - Please support unmannedspaceflight.com by donating here.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Feb 8 2012, 01:45 AM
Post #6


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5318
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



I'll just mention a few faves. No links (I don't have time right now to search them out).

There's one on volcanic channels on Mercury - one big channel had been shown before but a couple of other small ones are highlighted now.

Several on landing sites for future missions on Mars, a few of them with potential rover traverses.

Several on future landing sites on the Moon, at the north pole, in Cabaeus, on the rim of Tycho, in Amundsen... one on Luna-Glob landing sites has them slightly different from those proposed last November.

Lots on Vesta, including geologic maps of many quadrangles.

I was hoping to see more on Hartley 2's nucleus but was out of luck on that.


Phil



--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
antipode
post Feb 9 2012, 09:01 PM
Post #7


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 145
Joined: 1-October 06
Member No.: 1206



I love these 'abstracts' because they are more like mini papers! (requiring 'abstracts of the abstract' which made me laugh).

Hours of good reading - especially the Martian glaciology, Mercurian volatiles and Titan climate stuff.

However, THIS really caught my interest (and given Emily's comment above I'll supply the link)

http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2012/pdf/1713.pdf

I'd never seen a projection of Dione's south pole before. Plus those putative extinct (dormant?) 'tiger stripes', a pedestal crater, and a funky looking cryovolcano. Very cool stuff.

P
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
MarcF
post Feb 9 2012, 09:28 PM
Post #8


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 173
Joined: 16-May 06
From: Geneva, Switzerland
Member No.: 773



Nothing about the Uranian or Neptunian systems sad.gif
Is there no research/interest at all about these Worlds at the moment ?
Marc.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
elakdawalla
post Feb 9 2012, 09:37 PM
Post #9


Bloggette par Excellence
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 4259
Joined: 4-August 05
From: Pasadena, CA, USA, Earth
Member No.: 454



LPSC is a geology conference, primarily about unpublished work in progress, and there's really not much geology that can be done on those systems that hasn't already been done on Voyager images. For sure there is interesting work being done from telescopes, but you wouldn't present that at LPSC; you'd go to AAS or DPS.


--------------------
My blog - @elakdawalla on Twitter - Please support unmannedspaceflight.com by donating here.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ngunn
post Feb 9 2012, 10:09 PM
Post #10


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 3069
Joined: 4-November 05
From: North Wales
Member No.: 542



QUOTE (antipode @ Feb 9 2012, 09:01 PM) *
'abstracts of the abstract' which made me laugh


There is a degree of unbuttoned informality about the whole event. The organisers give sessions quirky titles and in the mini-papers the scientists can use language freely, sometimes coining new words, and invoke extra-scientific cultural references for effect: comic, serious, or both at once. Such things might not pass peer review but they do not detract from the science in any way, quite the opposite in fact. The party mood is infectious even for a distant onlooker.

Thanks to antipode and others for the pointers to interesting topics. I loved the Martian basalt columns. I have a small piece of a much narrower basalt column in my attic rock collection (Carboniferous, Fife, Scotland).
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 19th April 2014 - 02:33 PM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.