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JUICE, ESA's L-class mission to the Jovian system
stevesliva
post Apr 18 2012, 05:29 PM
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QUOTE (Seryddwr @ Apr 18 2012, 12:59 PM) *
Something to look forward to in a few years.


Eighteen years (!)

But I should say-- I'm still excited nonetheless!
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Guest_Sunspot_*
post Apr 18 2012, 05:57 PM
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Guests






Arrival date 2030 blink.gif
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Drkskywxlt
post Apr 18 2012, 06:12 PM
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Earth-Venus-Earth-Earth gravity assists. Tradeoff for having a big spacecraft with relatively moderate onboard delta-V capability.
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Bjorn Jonsson
post Apr 18 2012, 07:15 PM
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Impressive imaging capabilities (from the yellow book mentioned in the first message of this thread):

A narrow angle framing camera with 1024x1024 pixels, 0.3° FOV and 12 filters that can also do pushbroom imaging. This is roughly two times Galileo's resolution (800x800 and 0.47°) and means that e.g. Io monitoring is possible in addition to Jupiter and icy satellite imaging. For comparison, Cassini's NAC has a FOV of 0.35° and 1024x1024 pixels.

A wide angle camera with 1024x1024 pixels, 117° FOV and 12 filters.

A hyperspectral pushbroom imager with 3.4° FOV, 0.4-5.2 μm spectral range and spectral sampling 2.8-5.0 nm, lines x arrays=640 x 480.

These specs are apparently not final though.
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machi
post Apr 18 2012, 08:06 PM
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I did some quick comparison, what could be seen from JUICE, based on informations in Yellow book.

Image resolution comparison between older missions and JUICE's NAC camera:


And images of different bodies in Jovian system at resolutions obtainable by same camera:



Some more informations are on my blog.


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Bjorn Jonsson
post May 2 2012, 03:15 PM
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Another hurdle has been crossed - JUICE was approved unanimously by the ESA member state delegations today. News here:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-17917102

Great news - on to Jupiter!
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machi
post May 2 2012, 04:53 PM
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Same news from ESA.


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belleraphon1
post May 4 2012, 12:04 PM
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I LOVE outer planet missions.

JUICE Spacecraft gets to Jupiter in 2030… I will be 77 that year and my grandsons will be 24. In the span of my life I will have seen PIONEERS, VOYAGERS, GALILEO, ULYSSES, CASSINI, NEW HORIZONS, JUNO (maybe a new Europa/ Titan/ Enceladus) encounters with Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Pluto, and perhaps some Kuiper Belt objects. Ironically by 2030 we may have sensed the air of terrestrial type exoplanets. But physical travel to the bodies in our own solar system is still at a snail’s pace and outer planet missions (given chemical and low power electric propulsion) are still events for a generation. SIGH!
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TheAnt
post May 4 2012, 05:23 PM
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Yes the flight time with those gravity assists are considerable, and that even when launched by one Ariane 5.
Now that Ariane 5 ME will be available with the new upper stage, a shorter flight time might be available at the time for launch.

Yet of the about 5 ton to be sent to Jupiter, up to 3 tons might have to be propellant, some substantial part of that to be "juiced" for going into orbit around Ganymede.
And even though quite some of you appear to be pining for Europa, it is one really interesting moon, a magnetic field and where the grooved terrain is a sign of ice tectonics. And perhaps one liquid interior also, though not from current tidal heating so either from internal heat or preserved from the past when the interaction with Io and Europa were stronger, (the eccentricity is very low right now, but it might vary over quite long timescales - a possible connection to the magnetic field there, and Ganymede might even have auroras!)
Now with such a name they might have a perfect opportunity to get a sponsor, though it might be at the risk of getting the suggestion to have the space probe painted orange. *Ducks*
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belleraphon1
post May 4 2012, 06:54 PM
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I'd be ok with orange but not sure what that would do to the spacecraft's thermal properties. laugh.gif

Agree that Ganymede is indeed worthy of this visit. As is Callisto. All the Galilean moons are exciting worlds in their own right.

Craig
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Paolo
post May 5 2012, 10:16 AM
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I am amazed by how much solar panel technology has progressed in the last 30 years... Galileo had two RTG delivering 570 W at launch and 485 W at end of mission, JUICE will have solar panels delivering up to 636 W at end of mission. wow!


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I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
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tusenfem
post Feb 1 2013, 09:48 AM
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Ah! Instrument selection this month!
Let's see if the two instrument packages that I am involved in get selected.

January 2013 SSEWG and SSAC recommendations
February 2013 Preliminary technical KO of instrument Phase A
February 2013 SPC selection


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There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something you were after.
(J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit, Chapter 3 "A short rest")
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tasp
post Feb 1 2013, 11:02 PM
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I bet we already have contributors here imagining those 'Kodak moment' shots we all love.

A crescent Jupiter half risen above a craggy Ganymedean ridge with an Io suspended above the nightside perhaps . . .
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rlorenz
post Feb 21 2013, 01:55 PM
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QUOTE (tusenfem @ Feb 1 2013, 04:48 AM) *
Ah! Instrument selection this month!



http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Sc..._moons_explorer
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mcaplinger
post Feb 21 2013, 04:29 PM
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QUOTE (rlorenz @ Feb 21 2013, 06:55 AM) *

Anybody know the specific team affiliations? The release doesn't say.


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Disclaimer: This post is based on public information only. Any opinions are my own.
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