IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

 
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Temperature Measurements?, Do Spirit and Oppy report air temperatures on a regular basis?
antoniseb
post Mar 8 2012, 07:38 PM
Post #1


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 233
Joined: 2-August 05
Member No.: 451



Do Spirit and Oppy report air temperatures on a regular basis?

I've assumed they do, but I don't recall ever seeing any kind of report showing the day-to-day changes.
Over on BAUTForum, someone is asking about the temperature, and it would be nice to have a non-guess answer about the difference between the temp at aphelion and perihelion.

Thanks in advance.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Astro0
post Mar 8 2012, 10:16 PM
Post #2


Senior Member
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 2850
Joined: 21-December 05
From: Canberra, Australia
Member No.: 615



The Rovers don't carry instruments to determine air temperature as such.
The best you can generally say is that it ranges from 'cold to really, really cold'. smile.gif
On board instruments can provide an inferred temperature range.

One of the goals of the Rover mission is to characterise the daily weather conditions through observations.
http://marsrover.nasa.gov/science/goal2-results.html

The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's MARCI Instrument is designed to further observe weather conditions on the planet.
http://www.msss.com/msss_images/latest_weather.html

In general, across the Mars year, it is estimated that temperatures vary from a high of 20C (68F) to a low of -140C (-220F). Average temperature is -63 C (-81 F).

Google is your friend!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
centsworth_II
post Mar 8 2012, 10:34 PM
Post #3


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2061
Joined: 28-December 04
Member No.: 132



Extreme Planet Takes Its Toll has a lot of information.

"Rover engineer Dan Porter has been tracking temperatures recorded by 50 or so sensors on each of the rovers since shortly after they landed on Mars in January 2004. The results are not only of interest to scientists, they're a favorite of human audiences as well."

"During their exploration of Mars, the rovers have recorded temperatures ranging from midday highs of about 35 degrees C. (95 degrees F.) in spring and summer to nighttime lows of about minus 110 degrees C. (minus 166 degrees F.) in winter."
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
antoniseb
post Mar 9 2012, 12:27 AM
Post #4


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 233
Joined: 2-August 05
Member No.: 451



QUOTE (centsworth_II @ Mar 8 2012, 05:34 PM) *
Extreme Planet Takes Its Toll has a lot of information.

"Rover engineer Dan Porter has been tracking temperatures recorded by 50 or so sensors on each of the rovers since shortly after they landed on Mars in January 2004. The results are not only of interest to scientists, they're a favorite of human audiences as well."

"During their exploration of Mars, the rovers have recorded temperatures ranging from midday highs of about 35 degrees C. (95 degrees F.) in spring and summer to nighttime lows of about minus 110 degrees C. (minus 166 degrees F.) in winter."


Thanks! It doesn't quite tell me the aphelion/perihelion variations, but its a start.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
djellison
post Mar 9 2012, 01:08 AM
Post #5


Administrator
****

Group: Chairman
Posts: 13815
Joined: 8-February 04
Member No.: 1



Viking did this very well

http://www-k12.atmos.washington.edu/k12/re...ation/data.html

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
rlorenz
post Mar 9 2012, 03:28 AM
Post #6


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 417
Joined: 23-February 07
From: Occasionally in Columbia, MD
Member No.: 1764



QUOTE (centsworth_II @ Mar 8 2012, 05:34 PM) *
Extreme Planet Takes Its Toll has a lot of information.
[color="#000080"]
"Rover engineer Dan Porter has been tracking temperatures recorded by 50 or so sensors on each of the rovers since shortly after they landed on Mars in January 2004. The results are not only of interest to scientists, they're a favorite of human audiences as well."


If they're of such interest (and I totally agree), are they going to be put on the PDS ?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
centsworth_II
post Mar 9 2012, 05:33 AM
Post #7


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2061
Joined: 28-December 04
Member No.: 132



I don't know if it's any help, but based on aphelion dates of Aug 8, 2004 and June 26, 2006 and a perihelion date of July 17, 2005, I place these events thusly on the graph from Extreme Planet Takes Its Toll. Aphelions are in green and perihelion in yellow. I did my own calculations so buyer beware!
Attached Image
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
djellison
post Mar 9 2012, 07:36 AM
Post #8


Administrator
****

Group: Chairman
Posts: 13815
Joined: 8-February 04
Member No.: 1



QUOTE (rlorenz @ Mar 8 2012, 07:28 PM) *
If they're of such interest (and I totally agree), are they going to be put on the PDS ?


I found the EPOXI camera temp plots that went on the PDS fascinating. They only cover 2007-11, but they're interesting none the less.

I know that the headers for every image in the PDS have a swathe of temperature readings within them.


CODE
INSTRUMENT_TEMPERATURE          = (-12.2597 <degC>,-9.20895 <degC>,
                                     -8.08166 <degC>,-7.32423 <degC>,
                                     -7.36011 <degC>,-7.57261 <degC>,
                                     -13.3241 <degC>,-13.5143 <degC>,
                                     -9.27266 <degC>)
  INSTRUMENT_TEMPERATURE_NAME     = ("FRONT HAZ ELECTRONICS",
                                     "REAR HAZ ELECTRONICS",
                                     "LEFT PAN ELECTRONICS","LEFT PAN CCD",
                                     "RIGHT PAN CCD","LEFT NAV CCD","MI CCD"
                                     ,"MI ELECTRONICS","DESCENT CAMERA CCD")


I agree though - a verbose temp sensor dump would be fascinating for MER (and Phoenix)
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Drkskywxlt
post Mar 9 2012, 01:08 PM
Post #9


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 287
Joined: 29-August 06
From: Columbia, MD
Member No.: 1083



Might already know this, but MSL will have meteorological sensors and take regular temperature measurements. It's measurement cadence will be 1 Hz for 5 minutes every hour every sol. That adds up to 2 hours per sol. There is also power budgeted for another hour per sol for scheduled observation, so that could be a 1 hour continuous block or be split between the various 5 minute periods to lengthen them based on what's going on weather-wise.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
mwolff
post Mar 9 2012, 05:30 PM
Post #10


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 44
Joined: 16-January 06
Member No.: 646



QUOTE (Astro0 @ Mar 8 2012, 04:16 PM) *
The Rovers don't carry instruments to determine air temperature as such.
The best you can generally say is that it ranges from 'cold to really, really cold'. smile.gif
On board instruments can provide an inferred temperature range.

Google is your friend!



This is not quite true. Using Mini-TES observations of the surface, one can derive an "average" air temperature in the bottom 1.5 meter that is sampled along the path...by modeling the 15-micron CO2 with standard radiative transfer techniques (i.e., you need a combination of absorption and emission...but it is mainly an absorption effect by the colder air against the "warmer" surface for the day; the reverse for night). This works for most of the day and at night when there is enough surface-atmosphere thermal contrast. The science team has done this for the period when there was useful MiniTES data; I will dig this up and post a link to something that can be downloaded.

The science team always talked about correlating this with the onboard sensors -- which suffer from being inside the rover in some and thus not isolated from such thermal effects (even the one in the APXS probably has some contamination in it) -- in order to derive a calibration. However, I don't think that any one actually did this (on the science side).

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 31st October 2014 - 04:25 PM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.