IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

3 Pages V   1 2 3 >  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
schedule of future solar system exploration
Paolo
post Apr 20 2012, 09:37 AM
Post #1


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1344
Joined: 3-August 06
From: 43° 35' 53" N 1° 26' 35" E
Member No.: 1004



I posted this to the NASAspaceflight forum but it actually belongs to this forum.
the schedule comprises a few events that are not yet approved or fully funded (ExoMars launch, Deep Impact 3rd flyby etc.), I have not yet found a schedule of BepiColombo flybys after the recent one-year delay and I have not looked in detail at ESA's Solar Orbiter or NASA's Solar Probe+


June 2012 Discovery 12 selection
6 August 2012 Mars Science Laboratory lands on Mars
26 August 2012 Dawn leaves Vesta
March 2013 MESSENGER end of mission
9 October 2013 Juno Earth flyby
18 November 2013 MAVEN launch
20 January 2014 Rosetta exits from hibernation
summer 2014 Hayabusa 2 launch
August 2014 Rosetta enters orbit around Churyumov-Gerasimenko
10 August 2014 ICE Earth return
September 2014 MAVEN enters orbit around Mars
November 2014 Philae lands on Churyumov-Gerasimenko
February 2015 Dawn enters orbit around Ceres
July 2015 Dawn end of mission
14 July 2015 New Horizons flyby of Pluto
15 August 2015 BepiColombo launch
November 2015 Akatsuki second attempt at entering Venus orbit
December 2015 Rosetta end of mission
January 2016 Trace Gas Orbiter launch
5 July 2016 Juno enters orbit around Jupiter
August 2016 BepiColombo Earth flyby
September 2016 OSIRIS-REx launch
19 October 2016 Trace Gas Orbiter enters orbit around Mars
2017 Solar Orbiter launch
June 2017 Trace Gas Orbiter start of the science mission
September 2017 OSIRIS-REx Earth flyby
15 September 2017 Cassini plunges in the atmosphere of Saturn
16 October 2017 Juno plunges in the atmosphere of Jupiter
2018 Solar Probe Plus launch
April 2018 ExoMars rover launch
June 2018 Hayabusa 2 reaches its target asteroid (162173) 1999JU3
16 October 2018 Deep Impact Earth flyby
14 December 2018 ICE flies by comet Wirtanen
January 2019 ExoMars rover lands on Mars
October 2019 OSIRIS-REx reaches its target asteroid (101955) 1999 RQ36
January 2020 Deep Impact flies by asteroid (163249) 2002 GT
December 2020 Hayabusa 2 returns to Earth
27 January 2022 BepiColombo enters orbit around Mercury
September 2023 OSIRIS-REx returns to Earth


--------------------
I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Apr 20 2012, 03:36 PM
Post #2


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5683
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



That's a very nice list, very useful. I notice you completely exclude the Moon, and perhaps with good reason since exact dates may be very uncertain. Nevertheless, we can be fairly confident that Chang'E 3 will be sent to land on the Moon in late October 2013. All the other possible flights to the Moon (Luna-Resurs and Luna-Glob, Astrobotic or other GLXP flights, the European lunar lander for the south pole, later Chang'E flights, have uncertain schedules.

Phil


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
elakdawalla
post Apr 20 2012, 03:56 PM
Post #3


Bloggette par Excellence
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 4431
Joined: 4-August 05
From: Pasadena, CA, USA, Earth
Member No.: 454



Thanks, Paolo, for this summary. I'd add to it that NH Pluto approach observations begin January 2015 (LORRI will first be able to resolve Pluto in, I think, February 2015); the entire data set won't be on Earth until April 2016.


--------------------
My blog - @elakdawalla on Twitter - Please support unmannedspaceflight.com by donating here.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Paolo
post Apr 20 2012, 08:03 PM
Post #4


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1344
Joined: 3-August 06
From: 43° 35' 53" N 1° 26' 35" E
Member No.: 1004



QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Apr 20 2012, 05:36 PM) *
That's a very nice list, very useful. I notice you completely exclude the Moon


you are right! actually the reason is that the list is adapted from the final volume of my book series on the history of solar system exploration, and so it does not include the Moon...


--------------------
I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Paolo
post Sep 12 2012, 06:57 PM
Post #5


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1344
Joined: 3-August 06
From: 43° 35' 53" N 1° 26' 35" E
Member No.: 1004



I have updated the list, it now includes the timeline of the Solar Probe Plus and Solar Orbiter
as usual, I have included only missions that are approved and funded, with some uncertain ones in italics. I have not included lunar missions

Attached thumbnail(s)
Attached Image
 


--------------------
I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
climber
post Sep 12 2012, 08:19 PM
Post #6


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2616
Joined: 14-February 06
From: Very close to the Pyrénées Mountains (France)
Member No.: 682



Any chance to get a .PDF version, Paolo?


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Paolo
post Sep 15 2012, 05:07 PM
Post #7


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1344
Joined: 3-August 06
From: 43° 35' 53" N 1° 26' 35" E
Member No.: 1004



here you go!

Attached File(s)
Attached File  future.pdf ( 31.72K ) Number of downloads: 399
 


--------------------
I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
dombili
post Sep 15 2012, 08:25 PM
Post #8


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 5
Joined: 6-September 12
From: Istanbul
Member No.: 6640



I imported the list to Google Docs Spreadsheet (better formatting, also fixed some typos). Needless to say, all credit goes to Paolo.

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key...TTJFSmVhZEo5U1E (This is the editable version. If you think something is not accurate, feel free to edit. If you think something's missing, go ahead and add what's missing)

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key...ZVFCejhSNHdkQWc (This version is NOT editable. I made a copy of the editable version as a precaution, in case someone deletes the file, or somehow screws it up)
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Paolo
post Dec 31 2012, 03:14 PM
Post #9


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1344
Joined: 3-August 06
From: 43° 35' 53" N 1° 26' 35" E
Member No.: 1004



just a quick reminder of what's in store for solar system exploration in 2013:

four launches: LADEE (currently planned for 12 August), Chang'e 3 (second half of 2013, the first attempted lunar soft landing in 37 years!), MAVEN (window opens 18 November) and Mangalyaan (November)
one flyby: Juno flies by Earth on 9 October
one end of mission: MESSENGER in March (I have not yet heard of a further mission extension)

with my best wishes for a lucky 13 to everyone in the forum!


--------------------
I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Dec 31 2012, 06:40 PM
Post #10


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5683
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



Many thanks for a very useful list! And best wishes to all for what indeed looks like a very interesting year coming up.

Phil


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Eyesonmars
post Dec 31 2012, 09:24 PM
Post #11


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 85
Joined: 5-September 12
Member No.: 6635



I notice that we lose both Cassini and Juno within a few weeks of each other in the fall of 2017.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Explorer1
post Jan 1 2013, 07:57 AM
Post #12


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 913
Joined: 13-February 10
From: British Columbia
Member No.: 5221



Predictions of end of mission that far ahead should be taken with a grain of salt, IMHO. Who knows what will happened to bring it closer or farther for both spacecraft, whether in the outer solar system or on Earth.

Happy New Year BTW!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
nprev
post Jan 1 2013, 10:54 AM
Post #13


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 7022
Joined: 8-December 05
From: Los Angeles
Member No.: 602



Happy New Year to all as well!!!! smile.gif

Re EOM for Cassini & Juno: It's possible that Cassini may get an extension, mostly because it's RTG-powered; presumably the prime considerations will be available power remaining, bus & payload health, and estimated remaining fuel for the ACS & main engines.

Juno will probably go as advertised since it is solar-powered & the Jovian radiation environment will cause significant deterioration of its own power generation capability over time.

In both cases, EOM must occur while the spacecraft are controllable in order to preclude the possibility (however remote) of either of them impacting a moon of interest for future detailed studies of organic chemistry & thus possibly introducing terrestrial contamination since, as orbiters, neither was sterilized to planetary protection standards for landers.


--------------------
A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Paolo
post Jan 1 2013, 11:09 AM
Post #14


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1344
Joined: 3-August 06
From: 43° 35' 53" N 1° 26' 35" E
Member No.: 1004



plus, Cassini and Juno will be taking more or less the same measurements (radio tracking for solid core probing and microwave radiometry) at the same time on both gas giants


--------------------
I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Eyesonmars
post Jan 1 2013, 07:15 PM
Post #15


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 85
Joined: 5-September 12
Member No.: 6635



Yeah. While i'm fully aware of all the issues involved: It's too bad they cant be put into a parking orbit for retrivial by future space exploration archeologist.

On a related issue i've been looking into the possibility of MSL taking images or videos of the Viking Orbiters. I've uncovered this discussion on UMSF from 7-8 years ago which suggest at least one of the orbiters may still be in orbit. Would it be possible for MSL to be programmed to return appropriate evening and morning images looking for objects in orbit? If so would it be possible to indentify the orbiter? We could "practice" on the existing 3 active orbiters ...

Probably sounds crazy but it might be a good use of extended down periods like the present.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

3 Pages V   1 2 3 >
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 19th September 2014 - 01:51 PM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.