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MSL EDL Hardware, Its state & fate
MahFL
post Aug 7 2012, 07:15 PM
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QUOTE (Chmee @ Aug 7 2012, 06:25 PM) *
...
I ask because if was to keep running until it ran out of fuel and it had 140kg left..


The DM was programmed to burn for 6 seconds, then cut off on the flyaway burn.
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Roby72
post Aug 7 2012, 08:15 PM
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As for searching the ballast impacts sites I suggest to subtract an HIRISE image of Gale which was taken before landing with the new one. Some geometrical correction (because of the incline of the new one) and hopefully equal lightning in both do the trick. Searching for changing parts must be much easier then...

just my 2 cents..

Rob
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DFinfrock
post Aug 7 2012, 10:17 PM
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QUOTE (Pando @ Aug 7 2012, 06:33 PM) *
The dust cloud could have drifted somewhat since the crash. Looking at the crests of those black dunes, it appears that the prevailing winds are roughly north to south. If we're looking at west-northwest with the rear hazcam, I find it plausible that some drifting toward the left may have occurred due to wind.

Since we now have the direction roughly correct, it all depends on the exact timing of the images to really nail it down.


Since the parachute landed generally south of the line of the other impactors, we can safely assume that the wind was from north to south, which might support that hypothesis of a drifting cloud of dust. But of course, the parachute was drifting with the winds above the ground. We don't know for certain that the wind at the surface was also from north to south.

David
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fredk
post Aug 7 2012, 10:43 PM
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QUOTE (MahFL @ Aug 7 2012, 10:08 PM) *
The pointing direction of the landed rover was chosen as part of the EDL, with the front hazcams pointing at the mound. The DS could only fly away in one of two directions, so as to minimize plume impact on the rover, one was southerly, the other northerly.

Right! I only meant that it was possible that we landed SE of an interesting area, like for example where the three terrain types meet. Then we might've had to worry about the DS debris if we wanted to check out that area.

Of course the odds of that were slim, and the primary goal is southwards.
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fredk
post Aug 7 2012, 10:48 PM
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QUOTE (DFinfrock @ Aug 7 2012, 10:17 PM) *
Since the parachute landed generally south of the line of the other impactors, we can safely assume that the wind was from north to south, which might support that hypothesis of a drifting cloud of dust.
Wow, nicely deduced! So if we still have an offset in the cloud position relative to the DS azimuth after all the proper numbers are in, we could estimate the drift from the rhaz timing (assuming we have a reasonable idea of the DS impact time?) and an estimate (guess?!) of wind speed. Or we could turn it around and turn the measured drift into a wind speed measurement.
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elakdawalla
post Aug 7 2012, 10:59 PM
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QUOTE (fredk @ Aug 7 2012, 02:48 PM) *
Wow, nicely deduced!

Note: dfinfrock is a TV meteorologist in my hometown, Fort Worth, TX. He knows whereof he speaks when he talks about wind smile.gif


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atomoid
post Aug 7 2012, 11:07 PM
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MRO really got a good clear shot of everything in frame this time.

..looks like the skycrane fragmented into a splatter
the heatshield still in free-fall!!

anyone know if there are plans to do any interplanetery rubbernecking? Oppy's heatshield I recall gave up some useful data.

click me: wheel.gif
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bigdipper
post Aug 7 2012, 11:11 PM
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QUOTE (DFinfrock @ Aug 7 2012, 06:17 PM) *
...We don't know for certain that the wind at the surface was also from north to south.


Does the parachute act as a windsock and give us the surface wind direction at time of backshell/parachute impact?

The backshell comes to rest before the parachute which then settles on the ground downwind (S) indicating wind from the north at the surface at time of impact.
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MahFL
post Aug 7 2012, 11:12 PM
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QUOTE (DFinfrock @ Aug 7 2012, 11:17 PM) *
Since the parachute landed generally south of the line of the other impactors, we can safely assume that the wind was from north to south, which might support that hypothesis of a drifting cloud of dust. But of course, the parachute was drifting with the winds above the ground. We don't know for certain that the wind at the surface was also from north to south.

David


Don't forget the DS does a rather large avoidance maneuver to prevent the back shell/parachute from impacting the DS as it slows down.
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elakdawalla
post Aug 7 2012, 11:24 PM
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Ah, good point. Still, one can deduce wind direction from the direction in which the parachute settled.


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erwan
post Aug 7 2012, 11:29 PM
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QUOTE (elakdawalla @ Aug 7 2012, 11:24 PM) *
Ah, good point. Still, one can deduce wind direction from the direction in which the parachute settled.


Direction from backshell to parachute ; from NNE to SSW...


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Holder of the Tw...
post Aug 7 2012, 11:33 PM
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QUOTE (bigdipper @ Aug 7 2012, 12:17 PM) *
Were the hydrazine cells sufficiently designed to survive impact intact?


Not knowing anything about the specific design, I'm wondering if the tanks needed to be breached in order for there to be a hydrazine release. Depending on the location of the valves, might it have been sufficient to rip off part of the plumbing to empty the tanks?
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fredk
post Aug 7 2012, 11:37 PM
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QUOTE (elakdawalla @ Aug 7 2012, 11:24 PM) *
Ah, good point. Still, one can deduce wind direction from the direction in which the parachute settled.
Ah - I thought that's what he meant in the first place! Yes, it's the relative position of backshell and 'chute that gives the wind direction.
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gallen_53
post Aug 7 2012, 11:39 PM
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QUOTE (atomoid @ Aug 7 2012, 11:07 PM) *


There was some hallway gossip that the Skycrane would be carrying too much fuel when the tether was cut and could possibly be a threat to the rover due to exploding like a bomb after impact. Apparently it did blow up like a bomb but was far enough away to be a non-issue.

It would be cool to take a close look at the wreckage. However no one in their right mind would risk the rover by moving it close to the wreckage.

I'm hoping they will give the aeroshell a look. They gave the aeroshell wreckage a close look with MER-B.
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Explorer1
post Aug 7 2012, 11:54 PM
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By aeroshell do you mean the heat shield or the backshell? The latter was only given a distant glance across the horizon: see this thread:
http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.php?showtopic=9
And yes, that's actually topic 9!

MSL's heat shield is huge, I sincerely hope it's given at least a quick once-over see to see its overall condition, and what was excavated (it is in Mt. Sharp's direction, so they might well pass it on the traverse.
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