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CE-2 flyby of Toutatis
Paolo
post Dec 9 2012, 01:23 PM
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Itokawa had been imaged by radar before Hayabusa arrived


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machi
post Dec 9 2012, 02:34 PM
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QUOTE (tasp @ Dec 9 2012, 02:21 PM) *
I'm not thinking of any other 'rocks' imaged with ground based radar getting a nice visible light camera flyby...
Anyone recall any others?


Not exactly "rock", but also comet Hartley 2 was imaged by radar.
Here is article about "Radar observations of asteroid 25143 Itokawa".


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Phil Stooke
post Dec 9 2012, 02:53 PM
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Comparing the Itokawa radar images and shape model with the spacecraft images shows the limitations of using low resolution radar data. The basic size and elongation are well established but the two-lobe shape is not seen. For Hartley-2 two lobes are also resolved but not much more. But for Toutatis we have high resolution radar data and a detailed shape model, and nothing with that kind of radar data has been visited by a spacecraft. So this will be a very interesting encounter.

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JimOberg
post Dec 9 2012, 05:47 PM
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Technical info is great. Hsieh hsieh.

Big picture question: has anybody received any word about the health of the spacecraft in the past two months?

We're only days from the encounter. Is the absence of any news from China something to worry about?
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Explorer1
post Dec 9 2012, 08:38 PM
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The absence of news is business as usual over there. Has there even been an official announcement of this flyby yet from CNSA in Beijing?
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JimOberg
post Dec 10 2012, 06:14 AM
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QUOTE (Explorer1 @ Dec 9 2012, 09:38 PM) *
The absence of news is business as usual over there.


I beg to differ. When things have been going well, China has released a stream of information, even ahead of actual events. They have been far more open then the Soviets were in Space Race days. I remember and can compare/contrast.

This silence is unusual.

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Explorer1
post Dec 10 2012, 06:32 AM
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Yes, I've read Don Mitchell's page on the old Soviet missions to the Moon and Venus, and the lengths he had to go to. I'm not sure if he posts on here, but I;m sure has has good insights too.
I'm just saying we should not get our hopes for a real crisp and immediate release like we've become used to from NASA or even ESA. I'd even be happy with a Halley's nucleus type blur.
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Paolo
post Dec 10 2012, 08:15 AM
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there was a long article on the development of CE-2 on a Chinese site recently
http://zh.cnr.cn/2100zhfw/zhhz/201211/t201...511342196.shtml and http://zh.cnr.cn/2100zhfw/zhhz/201211/t201...1342196_1.shtml
at a certain point it is stated (my adaptation of a google translation):

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According to the latest news, Chang E 2 successfully completed further extend the test a second halfway correction, the whole control process satellite subsystems work properly, in good condition. Until October 9, Chang'e II satellite in orbit flight 736 days, has 2.61 million kilometers from Earth. Follow-up will be used to track and test our new two deep space monitoring stations and to carry out the technical test.


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JimOberg
post Dec 10 2012, 03:13 PM
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QUOTE (Paolo @ Dec 10 2012, 09:15 AM) *
there was a long article on the development of CE-2 on a Chinese site recently


Thanks, Paolo, that's encouraging.

I also found this more recent URL but I can't get my translators to work:
http://news.e23.cn/content/2012-12-10/2012C1000084.html

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Paolo
post Dec 10 2012, 06:01 PM
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another long article in Chinese linked today on the 9ifly forum
http://y234.cn/?p=6128


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JimOberg
post Dec 10 2012, 08:01 PM
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QUOTE (Paolo @ Dec 10 2012, 07:01 PM) *
another long article in Chinese linked today [url="http://bbs.9ifly.cn/thread-9843-109-1.html"]on the 9ifly forum [


I see a picture of chang'e-2 but can't get translator to work. Any help?

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stevesliva
post Dec 10 2012, 08:13 PM
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^ Google Translate
... seems to be a blogger asking similar questions. It appears based on english articles, so you get what we already know translated to chinese and then google-translated back. Wouldn't assume that will do anything but subtract information.
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elakdawalla
post Dec 10 2012, 08:13 PM
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Google translate worked for me. There's no new information in here -- in fact it links to Bill Gray's guest blog on planetary.org and to MPML. It provides background on Toutatis and on NEOs. Mostly it asks why the national space agency isn't ballyhooing this more, and then answers the question by explaining that Chang'E 2's ability to get good data on the encounter is limited, concluding that while any data will be interesting, the significance of this is more as an engineering test of the Chinese ability to make the encounter succeed, providing "valuable experience." Seems like a very nice explainer -- hopefully the author will get some traffic from Chinese readers smile.gif


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JimOberg
post Dec 10 2012, 09:17 PM
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QUOTE (elakdawalla @ Dec 10 2012, 09:13 PM) *
Google translate worked for me.


thanks. i agree that the technology demonstration of the SEL2 dwell, and the departure to the toutatis intercept point, are awesome new levels of space navigation capabilities. it would be nice to get images but your own blog put that in perspective.

i'm working to get my own media clients to appreciate the accomplishment and not to set artificially high success criteria.

would clementine have faced the same problem with asteroid imaging, or was its survey camera of a different design?

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mcaplinger
post Dec 10 2012, 09:51 PM
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QUOTE (JimOberg @ Dec 10 2012, 02:17 PM) *
would clementine have faced the same problem with asteroid imaging, or was its survey camera of a different design?

The Clementine cameras were all framing cameras with filter wheels, so no.

That said, slewing a pushbroom imager is not that big a deal; see http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/mgs/msss/camera/i..._98_phobos_rel/ Of course I don't know how CE2's attitude control system works.


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Disclaimer: This post is based on public information only. Any opinions are my own.
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