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MSL Route Map
markril
post Sep 18 2012, 05:57 PM
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Here's an estimate for Sol 42. It's easier to identify some of these ground features when viewing in 3D.

Attached Image


Attached File  Sol_42.kmz ( 1.1K ) Number of downloads: 108


Mark
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Phil Stooke
post Sep 18 2012, 06:18 PM
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I got the same location!

Phil

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Hanno
post Sep 18 2012, 08:09 PM
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Could you add a scale bar to the route map? That would be really helpful in understanding it. smile.gif
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Doc
post Sep 18 2012, 08:27 PM
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Not to worry Hanno, Phil has promised that. BTW welcome to UMSF.com seeing it is your first post!


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Phil Stooke
post Sep 18 2012, 08:44 PM
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I'll get to it, but it helps to recall from the JPL news updates that the longer drive segments are generally about 30-35 m long.

My intention is to work on these maps at a standard scale with a 100 m grid superimposed. For areas with a lot of activity in a small area I will make more detailed maps at a larger scale, with a scale bar. The current map is between the two scales and I'm working on a different version for later, but right now I want to keep using this high contrast enlarged HiRISE base.

Phil



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dvandorn
post Sep 18 2012, 08:51 PM
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I know I have been assuming standard map orientation with North up, West to the left, etc., etc. Assuming the HiRISE image was taken in the afternoon, that would be consistent with the lighting.

Obviously, if we need to slew a map around for ease of demonstrating a particular route (as I can imagine may be needful when we get around to things like driving up a drywash cut canyonlike into the lower mound), it would be nice to see a compass rose somewhere, just for general orientation... and to help people like me find things when someone says "it's just west of the Sol 24 position." wink.gif

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Tesheiner
post Sep 18 2012, 10:25 PM
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Here's my version of route map for Google Earth / Mars.
Attached Image

Attached File  Route_Map_Sol42.kmz ( 1.16K ) Number of downloads: 150


Phil, slight differences on the sol locations aside, I see that the route on your map have a rotation of a few degrees (five?) when compared to mine and the same happens to the HiRISE background. I'm using the map-projected version of ESP_028401_1755 as a reference to register the polar mosaics and which is presumed to have North up. What do you think? unsure.gif
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Phil Stooke
post Sep 18 2012, 10:32 PM
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I'm using a map-projected image as well, but a pre-landing one chosen to be almost vertical (I don't have the file name with me right now). The incidence angle might cause an apparent rotation on sloping ground. And map projection might be based on a different central meridian or based on a preliminary ephemeris.

Phil


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stewjack
post Sep 18 2012, 10:52 PM
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QUOTE (markril @ Sep 18 2012, 12:57 PM) *
It's easier to identify some of these ground features when viewing in 3D.

Mark


Definitly true in my case, once I created a Anaglyph and compared it to Marks visual explanation. (see below)

http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.p...st&id=28176

I hope this down and dirty Anaglyph provides some context for other people.


Attached Image


What I am not certain about is that this view is toward the NE. Also that mid distance could be described as a view of the northern portion of Glenelg. If I was a sailor I would describe my method as dead reckoning. I am not going to have time for much else. Back when Spirit was climbing Husband Hill I dead reckoned myself down and about 50 meters back out onto the plains before I was totally convinced I was completely lost!

Jack

EDIT Changed SE to NE.
Thank you markril!
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markril
post Sep 18 2012, 11:22 PM
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FWIW, I've been using the orthoimages from this DTM page:

http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/dtm/dtm.php?ID=PSP_010573_1755

Specifically:

PSP_010573_1755_RED_A_01_ORTHO
PSP_010639_1755_RED_A_01_ORTHO

They are map-projected, but are also adjusted using the DTM data to be a view looking directly down.

Mark

P.S. Jack, that view is looking NE... smile.gif
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jmknapp
post Sep 19 2012, 12:29 AM
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Could rover shadows be used to get a rough fix? For example this shot:

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/ra...0427M_&s=42

NASA does mark the UTC time of the shots (one of the few bits of shooting conditions given), in this case 2012-09-18 09:38:11 UTC. An ephemeris program shows that the sun at the MSL site at that time was at 25.1° elevation and 275.1° azimuth, so the shadow of a vertical gnomon would be at 95°. Here's the image with the camera boresight and the approximate location of the right navcam shadow marked with red dots:

Attached Image


The separation between the dots is 392 pixels horizontally and 188 vertically. The navcams are specced at 0.0468° per pixel, so that's 18° in azimuth and 9° in elevation. So an estimate of the direction of the camera boresight is 95° - 18° = 77° azimuth and -25° + 9° = -16° elevation--assuming the mast is vertical, using plane geometry, level ground, etc. As a rough check, there are about 384 pixels (16.4°) from the boresight to the horizon, which works out to pretty close to 0°.


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stewjack
post Sep 19 2012, 01:43 AM
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QUOTE (markril @ Sep 18 2012, 06:22 PM) *
P.S. Jack, that view is looking NE... smile.gif


AARG! I am cursed. I really meant to write NE or ENE. The general direction to a region north of the Glenelg. The red dot on the JPL graphic PIA16148.
I have the PIA1648 graphic on my desktop! I have MSL's location on sol 42 marked on that graphic! I am pretty certain that North is up in that graphic! That is generally the direction I thought I was looking. But that is not what I wrote!


Attached Image


This is the (approximate) direction that I think is shown in images NXA_401232890EDR_F0041632NCAM00427M_.JPG







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elakdawalla
post Sep 19 2012, 03:50 AM
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QUOTE (jmknapp @ Sep 18 2012, 05:29 PM) *
Could rover shadows be used to get a rough fix?
My boss and sundial fanatic Bill Nye would love this smile.gif Stellar fixes of one kind or another always seem to be the ultimate aid to navigation!


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jmknapp
post Sep 19 2012, 10:23 AM
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I saw Bill Nye's presentation at PlanetFest where he talked about his father being a dialist (S.O.D.--sundial obsessive disorder). It was a charming talk. I had to laugh at his description of the "furniture" on dials like the obligatory motto, particularly his example of a French motto: "every hour injures, the last one kills." Ouch. MSL rejects French fatalism: "To Mars, To Explore."

One sol at a time...


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Reckless
post Sep 19 2012, 12:39 PM
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So not cartesians cartographers

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