IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

2 Pages V   1 2 >  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Miranda: Verona Rupes
Phil Naranjo
post Aug 31 2012, 11:51 PM
Post #1


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 8
Joined: 9-August 12
From: Seattle, Washington (USA)
Member No.: 6517



Hi...just wondering if anyone has a reliable source for the height of Miranda's spectacular Verona Rupes fault scarp? Estimates for the height range from 5 km to 20 km.

Thanks,
--Phil


--------------------
Twitter: @philna | seattle.wa.usa
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
vikingmars
post Sep 3 2012, 12:11 PM
Post #2


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 597
Joined: 19-February 05
From: France, close to Paris & Meudon Observatory
Member No.: 172



Well... Ask Phil Stooke, the "other Phil". He might know, having cartographed already most bodies of the solar system...
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Naranjo
post Sep 4 2012, 10:13 PM
Post #3


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 8
Joined: 9-August 12
From: Seattle, Washington (USA)
Member No.: 6517



I see...thanks for the suggestion.

--Phil


--------------------
Twitter: @philna | seattle.wa.usa
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Sep 4 2012, 10:45 PM
Post #4


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5627
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



Hi - you'll have to wait until I get back from my current trip (I'm in the Irish Sea right now). When I have access to my stuff I'll see what I can find.

Verona Rupes is not vertical, it's a talus slope at angle of repose, so there may be differences between estimates of slope length versus actual depth. I had an LPSC abstract on that topic back in the Jurassic Period.

Phil



--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
stevesliva
post Sep 5 2012, 12:25 AM
Post #5


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1164
Joined: 14-October 05
From: Seattle
Member No.: 530



QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Sep 4 2012, 05:45 PM) *
Verona Rupes is not vertical, it's a talus slope at angle of repose

I always wondered about that. I thought it looked suspiciously slope-like. Now I feel cheated-- what fun would be tumbling down low-G scree?? I always envisioned jumping off it and very slowly falling. I supposed I should adjust my vision to dropping a boulder off the top and creating a massive yet extremely slow avalanche/slough.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Naranjo
post Sep 6 2012, 01:47 AM
Post #6


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 8
Joined: 9-August 12
From: Seattle, Washington (USA)
Member No.: 6517



Very interesting Phil. I'd like to see your estimate of the slope angle and your abstract, if you're able to share it. Verona Rupes has a somewhat mythic reputation and much of the information about its depth is rather inconsistent. This is surprising given the exceptional quality of the 1986 Voyager 2 photos.

Thanks,
--Phil


--------------------
Twitter: @philna | seattle.wa.usa
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Sep 7 2012, 09:00 PM
Post #7


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5627
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



Exceptional quality, yes, but no stereo coverage of this area of Miranda, so no topography.

I'll be back home in a week... just south of Iceland at the moment...

Phil


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Tom Tamlyn
post Sep 7 2012, 10:16 PM
Post #8


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 273
Joined: 1-July 05
From: New York City
Member No.: 424



off topic:

QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Sep 4 2012, 06:45 PM) *
(I'm in the Irish Sea right now)

QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Sep 7 2012, 05:00 PM) *
just south of Iceland at the moment...

I trust when you return you'll share an account of this wonderful sail, with pictures please.
/off topic
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Sep 19 2012, 08:16 PM
Post #9


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5627
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



Here is my 1991 LPSC abstract about Miranda.

http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc1991/pdf/1667.pdf

I can't believe I've been doing this for over 20 years... 26 actually as my first LPSC was in 1986.

Phil


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
MarcF
post Sep 19 2012, 09:31 PM
Post #10


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 177
Joined: 16-May 06
From: Geneva, Switzerland
Member No.: 773



I read this abstract many times Phil. This is the best study of the inter-coronae regions I have found so far. This geological map of Miranda is just great. I do not think that I will again see another mission to Uranus and it's amazing moons in my life (even if I'm "just" 42 !!). Maybe I'm too pessimistic !
Best Regards,
Marc.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Naranjo
post Sep 27 2012, 07:17 PM
Post #11


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 8
Joined: 9-August 12
From: Seattle, Washington (USA)
Member No.: 6517



Thanks, Phil! ...I just returned fom vacation and found your abstract post. So the cliffs are likely more like 5 - 15 km. Would the base of the cliffs be filled a sloping mass of ice/rocky talus? I wonder how far this would spread out in low-g.

BTW, the abstract is now 404.

Thanks,
--Phil


--------------------
Twitter: @philna | seattle.wa.usa
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
DrShank
post Oct 10 2012, 01:04 AM
Post #12


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 160
Joined: 6-March 07
From: texas
Member No.: 1828



check out this post for a year or so ago . . .
http://stereomoons.blogspot.com/2009/09/mi...as-warning.html
Includes global map and topography of the south.
I suppose i should write this up one of these days with some actual measurements and stuff . . .


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Naranjo
post Oct 13 2012, 11:31 PM
Post #13


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 8
Joined: 9-August 12
From: Seattle, Washington (USA)
Member No.: 6517



The video and still projections are fantastic! It looks like you're landing north of the Alonso crater near where Argiers and Verona Rupes meet. It would be interesting to to see this as a spherical projection, if you get around to it someday.

BTW, do you know if there's any evidence suggesting that Miranda is experiencing active cryovolcanism? It's such tortured terrain - reminds me of Enceladus. I realize Voyager 2 did not detect any plumes and that only half the satellite was imaged. Could ground-based telescopes have picked up the telltale traces of ammonia around Miranda?

Oh, also, would you happen to know where I can find more info about how Miranda is interacting with the Uranian magnetosphere and radiation belts?

(Disclaimer: I'm a software designer with a b/g in astronautics. When it comes to planetary science, I'm an enthusiatic noob and simply interested in learning.)

Thanks again,
--Phil


--------------------
Twitter: @philna | seattle.wa.usa
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
nprev
post Oct 13 2012, 11:52 PM
Post #14


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 6986
Joined: 8-December 05
From: Los Angeles
Member No.: 602



Shooting from the hip, here, I'd call active cryovulcanism unlikely in the modern era. Both the primary body & the other moons are significantly less massive than Jupiter & Saturn (and their own moons), so the tidal forces are correspondingly less as well.

Uranus clearly experienced something during its wild youth; a 98 deg polar inclination doesn't happen for nothing. The fact that its rings & moons are all equatorally coplanar implies that they formed after this event, whatever it was. But I suspect that this was the last & most significant energetic event that ever happened there cause, baby, it's COLD outside.


--------------------
A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Naranjo
post Oct 16 2012, 11:14 PM
Post #15


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 8
Joined: 9-August 12
From: Seattle, Washington (USA)
Member No.: 6517



QUOTE (nprev @ Oct 13 2012, 04:52 PM) *
Shooting from the hip, here, I'd call active cryovulcanism unlikely in the modern era. Both the primary body & the other moons are significantly less massive than Jupiter & Saturn (and their own moons), so the tidal forces are correspondingly less as well.

Uranus clearly experienced something during its wild youth; a 98 deg polar inclination doesn't happen for nothing. The fact that its rings & moons are all equatorally coplanar implies that they formed after this event, whatever it was. But I suspect that this was the last & most significant energetic event that ever happened there cause, baby, it's COLD outside.



True...and I think that's been the conventional thinking about the Uranian system. However, just today, this was posted on the Planetary Society blog regarding findings reported at the DSPS 2012 meeting:

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakda...4-dps-day1.html

"...Uranus has a blue ring analogous to Saturn's E ring, which is of course supplied by Enceladus' geysers. Uranus' ring is associated positionally with the satellite Mab, which is way too tiny to have any hope of Enceladus-like activity. She suggested that there has been migration of the moons and/or ring material and that Ariel could originally have been the source and may relatively recently have been geologically active."

Admittedly, Ariel is 20x more massive than Miranda (which is 1.5x less massive than Enceladus). Interesting...


--------------------
Twitter: @philna | seattle.wa.usa
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

2 Pages V   1 2 >
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 29th August 2014 - 02:03 PM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.