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Continuing into Glenelg, Leaving Rocknest behind, sols 102-166 (Nov 18 2012-Jan 23, 2013)
SFJCody
post Nov 21 2012, 02:27 AM
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I'm kind of looking forward to southern hemisphere winter now (solstice on Feb 15 2014). The walls of Gale were already fairly clear after landing, but just think how much more spectacular they'll look once some of this dust settles out!
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Zelenyikot
post Nov 21 2012, 02:47 AM
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It is interesting to me as degree of a dust content will affect RAD indications.


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ChrisC
post Nov 21 2012, 02:51 AM
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QUOTE (Astro0 @ Nov 20 2012, 10:11 PM) *
ADMIN NOTE: TO ALL... Following the interview by MSL PI John Grotzinger today, there has been much speculation about the nature of any future announcement. We would remind everyone on UMSF about Rule 1.3. We appreciate that this is a very strict rule but we do expect everyone to follow it. We may review and amend the rule at some future point, but for now it stands as is. Many thanks for your understanding.


Rule 1.3 for people like me who had no idea: Astrobiology may not be discussed here, even in the context of a mission with those stated goals. This includes other banned topics such as SETI, "Red Rain," alien visitors, exobiology, biosignatures, microorganisms, organics, fossils et cetera.
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stevelu
post Nov 21 2012, 04:20 AM
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background on the strictness of the rule here:
http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.p...ic=7514&hl=

some discussion here
http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.p...=7187&st=15
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fredk
post Nov 21 2012, 05:06 AM
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Remember too that one of the main points of the npr story was that there is no announcement yet, and there may never be if the result turns out to be a glitch or whatever.

But even if it holds up, "This data is gonna be one for the history books" could mean all sorts of things. A geologist might find something very important and exciting, which the public might be utterly bored by.
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serpens
post Nov 21 2012, 06:35 AM
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Too true. Remember the hype over presidential briefing which then devolved to perchlorates? Could be anything from superoxides to carbonates. This partial leak approach is in reality a pretty poor show. Unless this is a really amazing discovery then much better to have said nothing since expectations have now been raised and disatisfaction exists where outcomes do not meet expectations.
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Cargo Cult
post Nov 21 2012, 10:48 AM
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Is this the right place for an interactive panorama of Curiosity's latest position? Requires a WebGL-enabled browser.

(I noticed there were enough images from NAVCAM to make a rough, 360-degree view around the rover. Images are from the right-hand NAVCAM, sols 102 through 104. There's a blurry patch where I filled up a hole in the full-resolution image with pixels from a thumbnail. The ground nearest the rover on its right-hand side (left-hand side looking back) was upsampled from 512-square downsampled images. I monkeyed round with exposure a fair amount, especially to get the distant hills vaguely visible. The whole image has been shifted down manually in Photoshop, to combat Hugin's decision to put the horizon too high. I need to find a better way of fixing that. Anyway, as a first attempt with building an interactive panorama from NAVCAM images, it worked quite well!)
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Tesheiner
post Nov 21 2012, 11:28 AM
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This is the thread, yes. Great job!
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Stu
post Nov 21 2012, 11:29 AM
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Loving the latest images to come back from Curiosity, some really fascinating-looking rocks...

Attached Image


Gorgeous layering in that one.

More on my blog, if anyone wants a look, just posting link here because they're waaaaay too big to post...

http://galegazette.wordpress.com/2012/11/21/and-relax


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Ant103
post Nov 21 2012, 12:39 PM
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Nearly full 360 anaglyph pan of Sols 102 & 103 (12.5 Mo) :



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RonJones
post Nov 21 2012, 04:16 PM
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As for the big announcement on Curiosity results, space.com is reporting:

"Grotzinger confirmed to SPACE.com that the news will come out at the fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union, which takes place Dec. 3-7 in San Francisco."



ADMIN NOTE: ALL, until that official announcement, this is the last comment we will permit on this subject.
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newdaddy06
post Nov 21 2012, 04:18 PM
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Looking at the interactive pan ("NAVCAN Glenelg") posted above, does anybody know what that bulge on the horizon (looks like maybe a Toyota Prius) is, in line with the right edge of the RTG (off the tail end of the rover)? It surely looks different than the landscape surrounding it. Maybe it's part of the entry vehicle or sky crane?

(Wish I could figure out how to include a screenshot of exactly what I am looking at, without having to put it on an external website somewhere.)
Attached thumbnail(s)
Attached Image
 
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elakdawalla
post Nov 21 2012, 04:38 PM
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If it's on the horizon, it is much bigger than any of those things. Also, on your screen cap, it's right at the boundary between two images, so it's hard to tell what it is. Try going to one of the raw image websites and find the original images. See if you can find it in both eyes of the rover. Get some 3D glasses and look at Ant103's pan. Figure out what direction the rover is facing using the shadows on the ground and the time of day (Joe Knapp's raw images page has local solar time on it). Compare it to Phil Stooke's route map and see if you can find a bump that seems like it's in a reasonable location. My prediction: it's an outcrop of rock.


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Phil Stooke
post Nov 21 2012, 05:18 PM
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It's the big lump very prominent in HiRISE images, as shown in the route map:

http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.p...st&id=28965

(upper left corner of that map).

It has been seen very prominently in every panorama since landing, from west, south and east as we passed it.

Phil


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... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
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fredk
post Nov 21 2012, 05:59 PM
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Yeah, that's what we referred to as "Rocky point" way back when.
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